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Best sprocket for tt500 Alloy or Steel?


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I am running a steel sprocket and standard (non-oring) chain on my race bike (w/steel swingarm). I chose that combo for the low cost and simple maintenance. So far, I have been happy with the setup.

Using an aluminum sprocket would reduce unsprung weight and improve the rear suspension action somewhat. But, I think the improvement would be negligible and not worth the extra cost of new sprockets/chain every season. I have 2 race seasons on the current set and they are doing well. Some chain stretch, but the sprockets look great. Everything should last another couple seasons.

If you are trying to squeeze every bit of performance out of your rear suspension, go for aluminum sprockets, aluminum swing-arm, Olins shocks, buy the lightest fresh tires for each race, and personally lose 15 lbs (or more).

That's too much commitment for me (money and diet). I am the limiting factor for my bike, not the parts.

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Glorydaze, I just checked out your garage pics. Looks like you already got the White Bros aluminum swing arm and Works shocks. So, I would be a little more tempted to go aluminum for the rear sprocket.

However, I doubt I could personally tell the difference in performance. I have run steel sprockets on my modern bikes and felt very little difference.

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I think you were right about the steel & it lasting longer. Sometimes it's nice hearing it from someone who races & knows. So I ordered a sprocket today. Do you race your TT500 in AHRMA, ADVMA events & what class do you run your bike? I messed my back up awhile back, but getting better I plan to get out to the track with this bike somewhere evo or post races are held. Nice action shots! Later. Chris

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I race the local TVRC vintage race club. I run the GP-1 class. My TT is competitive. As I mentioned, I am the limiting factor, not the bike.

http://www.tvrc.org/

Racing post vintage or EVO on a twin shocker is a tough way to come back from a back injury. But, who am I to pass judgment ? I fractured my tibia during this past season, missed a couple races and came back to run the final event. Quick healing for a 43 yr old.

I sent my motor out to a local flat track guy for a total rebuild this winter. I had him install a carillo rod, stainless valves, torque cam, cam chain, high lift valve springs, and stock compression 1 over wiseco piston. I also had him clean up the ports in the head while he had it torn down. In this mild tune with reasonable compression, I expect this motor will outlast me, and it makes plenty of tractable power. It's perfect for a MX track. I've seen other members of this forum with crazy TT motor builds, high compression, long duration/high lift cams, 38mm carb, etc. All that sounds like more RPM's, more heat, more stress, cooked clutches, and less time between rebuilds/maintenance. Keep your motor mods basic and you will have a longer lasting better MX motor.

Suspension is my next focus on the bike. The progressive shocks are not particularly friendly. But, they do have some stiff springs. I also have a set of stiff Icon springs in the stock forks with 15 wt oil. Bottoming is not a problem for me now, but the bike does beat the crap out of me in the braking and acceleration bumps. I'll be working on a plusher ride this summer and winter. You'll have to tell me what you think of the Works Performance shocks.

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RacerXr

I checked out your clubs web-site. you've got a great group down in Texas. Your motor work sounds tits! The guy I bought this from told me it had a shortened rod, cut piston skirts, ported, & larger valves or exhaust valve. But the only paperwork he had on the engine mods was a WB phase 1 cam. He was the 2nd owner. He bought it from his High school coach in 81. rode in the So-Cal desert for a couple of years & parked it Anyways I'm putting it back together. Had an 77 xt (brown one) when I was a kid stripped it down for The dirt, alot of fun. You guys have a summer break huh! Gets hot down there. If I learn to get pics on Photobucket I'll post my progress.

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  • 2 weeks later...
If you are competetive enough to where every ounce counts then the aluminum sprockets are the way to. If you are more concerned with durability and being cost effective then the steel is best.

Ya, I went & bought a steel Sunstar ( ugly ) It has oval holes. I know sounds pety but looks of coarse have alot to do with it.

What I would like to find is a 50 tooth steel with round holes like this. Any Ideas?

101_2732.jpg

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  • 1 year later...

I am running a steel sprocket and standard (non-oring) chain on my race bike (w/steel swingarm). I chose that combo for the low cost and simple maintenance. So far, I have been happy with the setup.

Using an aluminum sprocket would reduce unsprung weight and improve the rear suspension action somewhat. But, I think the improvement would be negligible and not worth the extra cost of new sprockets/chain every season. I have 2 race seasons on the current set and they are doing well. Some chain stretch, but the sprockets look great. Everything should last another couple seasons.

If you are trying to squeeze every bit of performance out of your rear suspension, go for aluminum sprockets, aluminum swing-arm, Olins shocks, buy the lightest fresh tires for each race, and personally lose 15 lbs (or more).

That's too much commitment for me (money and diet). I am the limiting factor for my bike, not the parts.

I couldn't have said it better. I agree with all points 100%

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