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Thats actually not a US model. We technically don't know if the US gets the 2 strokes yet.

If they don't send the two-stroke to the U.S. I'm strapping explosives to myself and going to Yamaha to have a chat with the CEO.

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im amazed they dont bolt on a few things and make a yz250x or something. ie..flywheel weight/tough pipe/suspension and factory big tank. at least it would get customers excited about a new model

I was going to say they do...it's called a WR but then I forgot they don't make the two stroke WR anymore.

It's funny how many people have jumped on the four stroke band wagon. I was watching a top-end rebuild on a KX450F and all I could think was...what a pain in the ass!!!

Valve cover, cams, chains, valves, blah blah blah...No thanks. I'll keep the cam and valves in my car that only has to be rebuilt every couple hundred thousands miles.

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We won't see a WR version of the current YZ250 as the WR's are for use as enduro, trail, or recreation bikes. That means used on public lands and not closed course racing, which means it has to pass emissions. I promise you a current YZ is a LONG way from meeting those emissions standards.

Now, if they could add that stuff, leave out a spark arrestor, and convince the EPA it was a race-only bike, then maybe Yamaha could sneek a WR250 two stroke out. But for every 100 of us on here saying we'd want one in a heart beat, maybe 1 person will go and put their money where their mouth is. That's one of the problems, we all want to see two strokes keep being updated and in production, but very few of us have the money to buy a brand new bike to help keep that dream alive. Manufacturers will follow the money, period.

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This bike IS groundbreaking people. No doubt. The most versatile 2 stroke 250 available. MX, enduro, CC, trails. Easily adaptable. Inexpensive to operate. The largest dealer network. Parts are cheap and easy to find. Highly sought after. Excellent resale value. Very usable tractable power. Reliable. Not orange....lol.

Right now I'm just laughing at all of these people slapping down deposits on Kato 350's before anyone has even had a chance to put it through its paces. For all we know the thing is gonna have some serious problems and be a total f*#@up.

Stick with a YZ 250 folks.

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It is my hope that Yamaha is being smart about this.

Yamaha appears to be playing a standard business plan -- they're not producing a large number of 2-strokes, and the bikes they do sell come with a price increase; classic Supply and Demand.

But by doing this, Yamaha can also determine exactly how big the die-hard 2-stroke market is.

If they listed "blow-out" pricing and sold a ton of 2-stroke bikes, they would never know if it was the PRODUCT or the PRICE that made the sale, and therefore not know the real market.

Plus, there are still a bunch of 'borderline' buyers that would jump off the 4-stroke bandwagon if the price was right, and Yamaha doesn't want to cripple that Golden Goose!

Also, Yamaha may be literally clearing the shelves of old stock -- metering out the last bit of outdated 2-stroke parts, and thereby avoiding the cost of restarting old-component production lines. Better to save that money for future products!

The early release of 2011 product information leads me to strongly believe that 2011 will be the last year of the CURRENT (2005-2010) Yamaha 2-stroke line.

But let’s see where that puts Yamaha;

- They’ve done literally NO product investment for the 2011 off-road motorcycle line up.

- Their 4-stroke YZfs will not need major refreshing for at least 2 years.

- Their 2-stroke line is the oldest key-market product in the industry.

- They’ve completely maximized their investment in the 2-stroke line-up.

- 2-stroke customers, though loyal, are becoming reluctant to buy dated goods.

- They already have plenty of 2-stroke Direction Injection experience.

http://www.yamaha-motor.com/outboard/05pi/vz300/05pi.aspx

- They have an accurate grasp on the size of the 2-stroke market.

- They need a headline-grabbing product, soon.

Now, if you were Yamaha, what would you do? 😏

Edited by CaptDan
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It is my hope that Yamaha is being smart about this.

Yamaha appears to be playing a standard business plan -- they're not producing a large number of 2-strokes, and the bikes they do sell come with a price increase; classic Supply and Demand.

But by doing this, Yamaha can also determine exactly how big the die-hard 2-stroke market is.

If they listed "blow-out" pricing and sold a ton of 2-stroke bikes, they would never know if it was the PRODUCT or the PRICE that made the sale, and therefore not know the real market.

Plus, there are still a bunch of 'borderline' buyers that would jump off the 4-stroke bandwagon if the price was right, and Yamaha doesn't want to cripple that Golden Goose!

Also, Yamaha may be literally clearing the shelves of old stock -- metering out the last bit of outdated 2-stroke parts, and thereby avoiding the cost of restarting old-component production lines. Better to save that money for future products!

The early release of 2011 product information leads me to strongly believe that 2011 will be the last year of the CURRENT (2005-2010) Yamaha 2-stroke line.

But let’s see where that puts Yamaha;

- They’ve done literally NO product investment for 2011.

- Their 4-stroke YZfs will not need refreshing for at least 2 years.

- Their 2-stroke line is the oldest key-market product in the industry.

- They’ve completely maximized their investment in the 2-stroke line-up.

- 2-stroke customers, though loyal, are becoming reluctant to buy dated goods.

- They need a headline-grabbing product, soon.

Now, if you were Yamaha, what would you do? 😏

Obviously we would want an updated 2 stroke with DI or other amazing advancements however my bet is they will finally put EFI on the 250F.

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If I were Yamaha I would do some kind of update on the bike and keep selling it and take more market share. People still want the bikes and they sell out all the time plus like everyone says it is getting harder to find a newer used model. Also the bikes get noting but rave reviews.

Anyways, new rims? What could be the need for a rim change?

Also has Suzuki updated the rm at all?

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Now, if they could add that stuff, leave out a spark arrestor, and convince the EPA it was a race-only bike, then maybe Yamaha could sneek a WR250 two stroke out. But for every 100 of us on here saying we'd want one in a heart beat, maybe 1 person will go and put their money where their mouth is. That's one of the problems, we all want to see two strokes keep being updated and in production, but very few of us have the money to buy a brand new bike to help keep that dream alive. Manufacturers will follow the money, period.

Speak you yourself. I don't need to be told to "put my money where my mouth is". I was just stating my opinion. I never said street or forest legal either.

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