Jump to content

Technique Question


Recommended Posts

Hi Guys,

My problem is balance and alignment..If I have time to setup for a jump I have no problem...The problem comes when your moving down the trail at pace and you have to "bunny hop" or yank on the bars because of an obstacle, wash out, jump etc...at a moments notice. My bars always pull right and I have to correct. I dont know if its my Arms, legs pre-loading, or torque from the motor, but it can cause some major pucker factor...Any tips would be appreciated.

SkisNH

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Guys,

My problem is balance and alignment..If I have time to setup for a jump I have no problem...The problem comes when your moving down the trail at pace and you have to "bunny hop" or yank on the bars because of an obstacle, wash out, jump etc...at a moments notice. My bars always pull right and I have to correct. I dont know if its my Arms, legs pre-loading, or torque from the motor, but it can cause some major pucker factor...Any tips would be appreciated.

SkisNH

It's a strength issue.

Is there a reason why your right is much stronger than your left ­čśĆ

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Couldn't resist.

Are you grabbing the bars @ the same place right to left. If you choke up on one side, you will apply more torque to the bars and cause them to skew.

How's your orientation on the bike? Are you leaning a bit to one side or more pressure with your right foot vs the left? That would cause the bike to track right.

Can you give more details. Sitting, standing, straight line, in a turn...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Couldn't resist.

Are you grabbing the bars @ the same place right to left. If you choke up on one side, you will apply more torque to the bars and cause them to skew.

How's your orientation on the bike? Are you leaning a bit to one side or more pressure with your right foot vs the left? That would cause the bike to track right.

Can you give more details. Sitting, standing, straight line, in a turn...

I'm running through the woods so body position and bike orientation is variable...If I see a jump or a whoop section, NO problem...But if I come to an "unexpected" obstacle I get that right bias torque.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is hard to tell without watching you ride. My guess would be a combination of being biased to one side both in strength and how you support your weight on the bike ie you tend to support your weight more with your stonger leg.

Try riding standing and take a foot off the pegs and continue to ride for a bit getting a feel for your comfort factor. Switch feet and do it again. If it feels way more comfortable on one side than the other then you need to practice standing and riding on the weaker leg.

We all have one leg longer than the other also a displaced hip will cause one leg to appear longer than the other. The longer leg thing will lead to the favored leg problem described above.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is not uncommon. The best remedy is to keep practising on the issue, it will slowly resolve itself. Try to stand as much as possible on the trails. Your legs are like an extension of the suspension and you are able to use you legs as leverage and you are in position to pop the front much better.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In my opinion...... If your using so much upper body strength that you are pulling the bike to one side you are going to (or do) burn out quickly. You have a throttle and a clutch. I guarantee it is faster and easier then trying to HULK out on the bars. practice it first. Find a object and keep hitting it. different angles/speed/directions. Then next time you come to the unexpected you just react.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can I ask why you are relying on 'yanking on the bars'?

My approach to clearing trail obstacles, riding whoop sections etc requires making 'the bike do the work'.

Rather than pulling up on the bars I pop the clutch and transfer my weight back simultaneously to loft the front wheel, or at least keep it very light.

Every bit of energy I save can be used to ride that little bit faster for that little bit longer. My upper body is only working to provide the finishing touches - keeping the front end pointed in the direction I want, maintaining balance and providing a little extra persuasion where necessary.

Whoops are a good example. You can't possibly pull up on the bars to coast through a prolonged whoop track. Correct clutch and throttle control transfers the 'heavy lifting' to the engine. Using the bike's drive to keep the front light means the bike coasts effortlessly.

Looking ahead down the trail, spotting an obstacle and being ready to loft the front wheel means I don't have to work as hard. Pinching the front brake prior to lofting the wheel (pre-loading the forks and using the rebound to assist in lofting) guarantees that the front will come up in time.

Standing when riding obviously plays a large part in being ready for such obstacles.

Little things like this and steering the bike with your pegs really takes the load off your upper body and keeps you feeling fresh for longer.

The more I ride, the less energy I find myself exerting. I know I'm not getting any fitter, its just my technique that's improving.

Not sure if I've digressed a bit... just trying to provide an alternative perspective.

Happy riding!

Berg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for your replies...I am riding today and will try and focus on what is happening mechanically with my technique...Usually I just ride! Today I'll try and find out what might be going on.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

├Ś
├Ś
  • Create New...