Jump to content

Rebuilding shock on kx250f


Recommended Posts

So I have a shock on an 04 kx250f that I'm rebuilding and I have a question on refilling the oil. The service manual for the bike isn't real clear on it and no tutorials I've read explains it real well. In the manual it says to fill the bladder side, put the bladder in and then fill the main part and put the piston in, then pump it to get the air out. Problem is while I was pumping it, it sucked the bladder in.

In other tutorials people say to put air in the bladder while you put the rest together, but the manual doesn't mention that at all. I need to know,

How much oil does it get, and how do I make sure I get all the air out? The manual says to do something with the air bleeder and filling it, but it doesn't seem to be working well...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the link, I'll follow those instructions.

As for it being trivial, I wasn't able to explain everything very well in my previous post as it was typed on my phone. Regardless, the other instructions never went over the procedure as well as the links on that site. Hopefully after I'm done with this one I'll "know what I'm doing".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 months later...

+1 desp, good work.

Frezno, how are you going to learn anything if you don't try? I think we should always encourage people to dig in and learn new skills. Forks and shocks are nothing to be scared of working on. The first time you rebuild and engine can seem confusing too, but do it a couple times and it's a breeze.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

+1 desp, good work.

Frezno, how are you going to learn anything if you don't try? I think we should always encourage people to dig in and learn new skills. Forks and shocks are nothing to be scared of working on. The first time you rebuild and engine can seem confusing too, but do it a couple times and it's a breeze.

You are right, but with suspension especially shocks it can be very dangerous when it is done wrong way.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

NOT a reason to not attempt it.

Read carefully, Jeezo. I never said, that he must not try it. I simply stated that he should know, what he's doing.

As Jusa said correctly, it might get dangerous if you're doing things wrong.

Best practice would be servicing the shock along with a friend who has the necessary knowledge. Another road to go would be to buy old, cheap shocks on eg ebay and practice on them to get some experience.

Sure, servicing a shock is no rocket sience nor brain surgery, but - as said - not that trivial as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Read carefully, Jeezo. I never said, that he must not try it. I simply stated that he should know, what he's doing.

As Jusa said correctly, it might get dangerous if you're doing things wrong.

Best practice would be servicing the shock along with a friend who has the necessary knowledge. Another road to go would be to buy old, cheap shocks on eg ebay and practice on them to get some experience.

Sure, servicing a shock is no rocket science nor brain surgery, but - as said - not that trivial as well.

Have a buddy that has been a mechanic for 30 years doing mostly tractors & heavy equipment. He was putting seals in his boys 250 SXF forks and found one leg didn't want to bleed properly. Had no rebound damping. So he called me and asked what I thought.

I took some extra parts & shims and went to his house. Pulled the forks apart and replaced the bent/broken mid-valve shims while he watched.

He said, I completely disassembled, rebuilt all valving & reassembled BOTH legs, in less time than it took him to put seals in one side...said after watching me do it he wouldn't waste his time fumbling with them. Even after watching me do it.

You really have to be completely honest about your mechanical apptitude...sometimes testosterone gets in the way...B)

๐Ÿ˜

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Read carefully, Jeezo. I never said, that he must not try it. I simply stated that he should know, what he's doing.

As Jusa said correctly, it might get dangerous if you're doing things wrong.

Best practice would be servicing the shock along with a friend who has the necessary knowledge. Another road to go would be to buy old, cheap shocks on eg ebay and practice on them to get some experience.

Sure, servicing a shock is no rocket sience nor brain surgery, but - as said - not that trivial as well.

Read carefully frezno.

Did I ever say, that you said, that he should not try it? Nope, I didn't.

I just don't think people should be scared to work on stuff, it's not that hard. Last night, having never done it before, I changed the LCD screen, midframe and digitizer on an ipod touch that I got off ebay for $20 and now its like brand new. That was harder than the first time I took forks or a lower end apart. I was 14 or so when I did my first lower end. I got new seals, torque wrench and impact wrench and a service manual and dug in. Sure, if you can get someone to teach you first, great, if not, GO FOR IT.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Read carefully frezno.

Did I ever say, that you said, that he should not try it? Nope, I didn't.

I just don't think people should be scared to work on stuff, it's not that hard. Last night, having never done it before, I changed the LCD screen, midframe and digitizer on an ipod touch that I got off ebay for $20 and now its like brand new. That was harder than the first time I took forks or a lower end apart. I was 14 or so when I did my first lower end. I got new seals, torque wrench and impact wrench and a service manual and dug in. Sure, if you can get someone to teach you first, great, if not, GO FOR IT.

Guess you didn't read this sentance of my post?๐Ÿ˜

You really have to be completely honest about your mechanical apptitude...sometimes testosterone gets in the way...
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just don't think people should be scared to work on stuff, it's not that hard.
Had no rebound damping. So he called me and asked what I thought.

I [...] replaced the bent/broken mid-valve shims while he watched.

see, and that's one very important thing.

It's not just the mechanical 'skills' or whatever one wants to call it, but it's experience.

I have to repeat myself again: You should know what you're doing.

I've seen too many forks and shocks (partially) ruined by the use of improper tools and/or lack of knowledge.

Do you know when you're disassembling a fork/shock whether all parts are ok, is there missing something, is there any parts turned upside down or assembled wrong?

Experience is important, my friend.

And how do you get experience? By trying. Do you get the experience by servicing your fork/shock once a year? I don't think so.

And that's why i said get at least help from a friend who knows the stuff.

Do i discourage people 'to learn suspension' ?

Not at all. That's the way i started, by being curious.

So i'm basically with you, Jeezo. It's just the way on how to reach the goal that obviously varies.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

see, and that's one very important thing.

It's not just the mechanical 'skills' or whatever one wants to call it, but it's experience.

I have to repeat myself again: You should know what you're doing.

I've seen too many forks and shocks (partially) ruined by the use of improper tools and/or lack of knowledge.

Do you know when you're disassembling a fork/shock whether all parts are ok, is there missing something, is there any parts turned upside down or assembled wrong?

Experience is important, my friend.

And how do you get experience? By trying. Do you get the experience by servicing your fork/shock once a year? I don't think so.

And that's why i said get at least help from a friend who knows the stuff.

Do i discourage people 'to learn suspension' ?

Not at all. That's the way i started, by being curious.

So i'm basically with you, Jeezo. It's just the way on how to reach the goal that obviously varies.

frezno wants you to learn! That why he contributes to the site and shares is knowledge.

jeezo, you are correct as well, you cant' be scared to dig in. I like to say, before you dig in, create yourself a pool of knowledge before you do anything and then you can tap into it. ๐Ÿ˜

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow ๐Ÿ˜

Feels like this is going around in circles.

If you read the original question it was regarding filling the oil and getting the air out, nothing more. The manual fully explained the safety and precautions behind everything else.

Now, that being said, it's been rebuilt for some time now (few days after this original post) and it's working great!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

ร—
ร—
  • Create New...