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How the Hell to seat the bead on new tire??


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Just put on a spankin new 756 on the front of my WR and for the life of me, I cannot get the entire bead to pop out. 7/8 of the circumference of the tire, the bead is out as it should, but I can't get the last part to come out. I have tried deflating and reinflating. Deflating and greasing the bead up with soapy water on both sides and reinflating to 50 psi. I tried bouncing the tire with low air,no air and big air. I pinched the bead to the center of the rim all the way around and reinflated. I just can't get it. Does anyone else have any tricks? I put it on the bike just to see how off it was when spinning--it is. Help! ๐Ÿ™‚

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I use washing up liquid, be sure to put it on both sides of the tire, check the rim lock is free before you pump the tire up, if not lift the tire off the rim with a tire lever, push the rim lock up and release the tire again.Hope this helps ๐Ÿ™‚

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Trauma,

I second what's been said so far, and will add a couple of things that I hope will be useful:

1) Clean the inside of the rim -- edges especially -- with a damp rag before installing the new tire; 2) Brush (mildly) soapy water as a lube onto rim edges and tire beads; 3) Make sure the part of the tire that isn't seating properly isn't hung up on the rim lock (i.e., the rim lock must, of course, be entire inside the tire -- such that the tire bead is not resting or catching on the edge(s) of the rim lock.) This can be best assured by making sure that the nut that secures the rim lock is threaded only onto the top of the rim lock "bolt" -- and that the portion of the bolt below the nut can be pushed down into the rim -- indicating that the edge(s) of the rim lock is not "captured" by the bead; 4) inflate the tire to -- I use 60-65 PSI; and 5) try hitting the tire wall (above the unseated bead and below the knobs) with the meaty base of your palm -- strike with as acute an angle as possibe in order to help "raise" the bead out of the rim. ๐Ÿ™‚

Actually -- here's where I learned the most about changing tires: http://home.cleanlink.net/enduro/Tech%20Info%20Web%20Pages/changing_tires.htm

Hope this helps, Yamsman

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Get it the best you can, then let the air out, then hit the tire with a rubber mallet from inside to out and work the bead into position. Be sure you have cleaned and deburred the rim and use plenty of lube too. You may have to repeat this several times. Be sure the tire is seated uniformly around the rim, especially if the tire has a rim protector groove.

I have to do 4 tires tonight and am not looking forward to it--I'd rather clean air filters! ๐Ÿ™‚

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Just an additional thought to what everyone has said. Assuming you are a)not caught ont he rim lock or the tupe is royally pinched between the rim and tire :D got the right size tire c)de barred your rim c) you did not elave a spacer washer or other piece in there

Try making sure all your spokes are tight and your wheel is true. Place the tire and rim out in the sun for about 45 minutes to get it nice and hot, then try the soapy water (or WD 40 or lube of choice) and inlfate till the sucked pops, sometimes its 70psi somtimes its 50, I usually stop when I pop the bead and don't care about air pressure. Never had any issues.

good luck

Cabo Kid ๐Ÿ™‚

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Tire tip for ya.

I used to use straight dish soap on the bead when changing tires. It makes changing a breese and your hands wash up nice afterwards. Problem I found out is that the dish soap eats the aluminum rims. My 95 yz250 rims looked like hell after about 3 years of doing this.

I now use wd40. Works great and dosn't eat the rims.

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Tire tip for ya.

Problem I found out is that the dish soap eats the aluminum rims. My 95 yz250 rims looked like hell after about 3 years of doing this.

I now use wd40. Works great and dosn't eat the rims.

Who told you that. We used it all the time at the shop i worked at, and nobody ever said anything. I'm not challenging you, just curious what made you think it was the soap? ๐Ÿ™‚

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One piece of advice, make sure the bead on your tire is not broke anywhere. Especially if you've rode half an enduro on a flat and go to fix the tube and just about the time you've realized the bead is broke you suddenly hear the sound of a 9mm going off sending you into an uncontrollable frenzy to verify all limbs are still in place not to mention the fear of your heart exploding. Trust me found out the hard way this weekend. ๐Ÿ™‚

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Trauma I am really sympathetic to your woes. I just last night reversed the rear tire on mine for the first time. I am glad the WD40 took care of it for you. It's my understanding that WD40 will come off pretty easy. I actually had to get my wife to help me. ๐Ÿ™‚ My hands are to big to get the valve stem in the hole in the rim. I guess I'm a loser.

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Who told you that. We used it all the time at the shop i worked at, and nobody ever said anything. I'm not challenging you, just curious what made you think it was the soap?

Well on my 95 yz250 the rims were hosed after 3 years using straight dish soap. Non diluted.

On my 99 yz400 the rims look great after 4 years using wd-40.

You be the judge. ๐Ÿ™‚

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I've also heard that the dish wash liquid eats into the rims. Something to do with salt or something like it in the mixture. I use a special lanolin based tire fitting compound and have no problems now. Even with 19" rears.

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