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2009 DRZ400S California Version Jetting Report


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I have now owned my DRZ400S, California version, since October 2009 and love it.

I have removed the charcoal canister, done the 3x3 mod, installed the JD Jet Kit and used the recommended setting for sea level to 4,000 ft and this setup is working amazingly well.

I am using the stock header and exhaust with no modification.

I have now run this setup in Death Valley at -200 ft elevation and last weekend I rode up to 12,500 ft.

I have ridden in 28 degree temps when it was snowing and last weekend rode in 104 degree heat.

I am extremely happy with the DRZ400S as a dual sport bike and with this jetting setup with the stock carb.

To date, this is my favorite dual sport bike and I couldn't be happier with it.

I have a Clark 4 gallon fuel tank and Dirt Bags soft panniers and this set up allows me to ride this bike just about anywhere.

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My dual sport group of riders is growing and my son has been without his own bike for a while. He has been using a friends dual sported KTM 525EXC so we have been able to compare my DRZ400S and the KTM side by side for the past 10 months.

We have taken both bikes on a variety of dual sport rides from Death Valley to the Sierra Nevada Mountains. We have ridden street, dirt roads, sand, whoops, single track, rocks and have ridden in 28 degrees while it snowed on us, up to 104 degree heat.

Both bikes are great but they are also very different. Both bikes are set up with 4 gallon fuel tanks and Dirt Bagz soft panniers. The DRZ is about 40 lbs heavier.

The DRZ' power delivery is much smoother and is better on the highway. The KTM is better if you want to ride fast and climb big hills at the desert but at the end of the day, I am less tired after riding the DRZ than the KTM. The DRZ requires less work to maintain. They are both great bikes but very different.

So...........it was time to buy another dual sport and after comparing these two bikes for 10 months in a variety of situations, I decided to buy another DRZ400S for my son to ride.

Edited by 52wheelz
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I picked up my second DRZ400s three days ago for my son to ride. He and I have decided it is the best dual sport bike for us based on the kind of riding we do.

The first thing I did was order all the parts to set it up just like the one I already have but I wanted to see how the bike, in stock trim, would work so we went for a ride in our local mountains.

Both DRZ's I own are 2009 California models. When I bought my first one 10 months ago, I rode it up into the mountains from my house to see how it would run in stock trim. I live at 200 ft elevation in Central California and the DRZ in stock trim runs great at that elevation but as soon as I rode up to 2,500 ft and above, it ran terrible. The higher I rode it, the worse it ran. That was 10 months ago.

With the new DRZ I just picked up, I decided to only do the 3x3 mod and open up the air box to see how it would run with stock jetting and more air.

Yesterday, we rode from 200 ft. up to 9,700 ft and back. Temps at the lower elevations were 92 degrees and dropped to a low of 65 degrees at 9,700 ft.

I was amazed at how well the bike ran at all these elevations. My son rode my rejetted DRZ400S and we both noticed that the rejetted DRZ did have a bit more power but not a dramatic difference.

I noticed the new DRZ did pop mildly on deceleration at elevation above 6,000 ft where the rejetted DRZ had no pop at all.

We rode 180 miles total for the day and refueled at 125 miles because I was concerned the new DRZ with the stock gas tank was about to run out of fuel. When I checked the gas mileage on both bikes and the stock DRZ with just the 3x3 mod got 68 MPG and the rejetted DRZ got 59 MPG. The stock DRZ had the stock tires, no panniers and the stock gas tank. The rejetted DRZ had Dunlop 606 tires, panniers and a 4 gallon fuel tank. Both bikes had the same tire pressure and we didn't drive above 55 MPH.

I'm not sure if the tires or the jetting made the difference but I was very pleased with the stock jetting with only a 3x3 mod.

I'm installing 606's on the new DRZ this week and a larger fuel tank so next week I will ride it again and see if the tires make that much difference in MPG or not. I plan to leave the jetting stock for now so I can compare how well it runs in a variety of situations, temps and altitude.

For those out there not wanting to hassle with rejetting the stock carb on a new DRZ, it seems that just doing the 3x3 mod is good enough to get started. That is good news for those with limited mechical skills.

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For those out there not wanting to hassle with rejetting the stock carb on a new DRZ, it seems that just doing the 3x3 mod is good enough to get started. That is good news for those with limited mechical skills.

above 5,000 ft ok.

at sea level doing the 3x3 mod 100% requires jetting.its not optional if you want the bike to run correctly.

if you have limited mechanical skills and dont want to rejet at sea levle dont cut the hole!

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above 5,000 ft ok.

at sea level doing the 3x3 mod 100% requires jetting.its not optional if you want the bike to run correctly.

if you have limited mechanical skills and dont want to rejet at sea levle dont cut the hole!

Thanks for the feedback.

I ordered the JD Jet kit the day I picked up the new DRZ and will rejet as soon as I get it.

Has Suzuki ever made any changes to the DRZ400S carb through the years?

Thanks for all the help you have given the DRZ community. It is a great bike.

Edited by 52wheelz
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yes the 2005 and newer carbs have a different main air jet orifice. its a fixed orifice in the carb.the 2005 and up bikes take a slightly bigger main jet in most cases.

Thanks Eddie.

More in my riding group are switching from their dirt bikes to dual sporting and the DRZ400S is the bike of choice for six of us now because it works so well everywhere we ride.

Since Yamaha, Kawasaki and Honda have ignored this segment of the market ( I don't believe the 250 dual sports are in the same catagory) and the KTM, BMW, Husky and Hasaburg dual sports are more high performance and high maintenence bikes.

This puts the DRZ400S is in a catagory all by itself with no competition and has all the after market support and parts to make it into whatever you want it to be.

A friend of mine works at a local Suzuki Dealership and reports that the local Police Dept. ride them 60,000 miles in stock trim before doing any engine work and we all know how bikes used by the police in the city are ridden. That says alot for this bike. The local BMW dealer says the R1200RT police bikes they service come in for brakes and tires every 2,500 miles so that gives you an idea how these police bikes are ridden.

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  • 2 weeks later...
How do you get such good gas milage? All Hwy? I consistantly get 40mpg. 2000 400s

When riding on-road we usually never ride above 55 mph. When off road speeds are usually never above 45 mph.

The worst gas mileage I have gotten to date is 36 mpg when I rode from Furnace Creek in Death Valley to Beatty, NV. This section of road is almost all up hill, we were riding into a strong headwind and I had the throttle pinned almost the whole way alternating between 4th and 5th gear and we rode 60 to 65 mph. This is with stock gearing.

Other than this one section, most of the time I'm only giving the bike 1/4 to 1/2 throttle at a steady speed with little to no wind.

The worst mileage I have ever gotton on a bike was on a 2007 BMW R1200GSA fully loaded riding west across southern Idaho into a 40-50 MPH head wind for 200 miles at 45-55 MPH. I got 28 MPG on that tank of gas so wind seems to affect mileage more than anything else in my experience.

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