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How many guys have trials bikes for practice?


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I've heard lots of pro racers either started with trials riding or have a trials bike to practice on. I've got a few questions pertaining to them,

1. Will this only help on slow speed obstacles like rocks/logs?

2. If I don't have any obstacles to practice on, just flat ground, can I still get something out of it?

3. Can't really think of anything else right now haha

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I rode trials for years and it helps tremendously. There is no coincidence that the elite off road racer are trials riders, some even World level trials riders. If you watch any of the extreme enduros, those are dominated by trials riders.

1. Will this only help on slow speed obstacles like rocks/logs? Trials is not about slow. It's about technique and mastering clutch, brake, throttle, suspension and weight. Learning to stay centered is probably to single most important thing trials will teach you. It carries over to most all motorcycle racing. The speed and weight of a trials bike allows you to try advanced techniques with less risk. Loading and unloading the suspension to bunny hop is the same technique needed to seat bounce a jump in motocross.

2. If I don't have any obstacles to practice on, just flat ground, can I still get something out of it? Absolutely, steering lock to lock figures 8's develop the clutch, throttle and weight control I mentioned. Figure 8's on a hill side are especially beneficial.

3. Can't really think of anything else right now haha. Besides staying centered trials will teach you how to use your clutch properly. Most offroaders see the clutch as a way to stop/go/shift gears and occasionally bring the rev's up. The clutch is your single biggest traction control device. You should think of the throttle as controlling engine speed and the clutch as controlling your forward motion. High level trials guys call it "left handed throttle".

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I don't compete at anything anymore, but have recently picked up a trials bike because I've gotten some lazy, bad habits in my old age.:banana:

It's tough to ride trials techniques after being away from it for 22 years. Riding for two hours on a trials bike is like riding a regular dirt bike for five hours. But I hope it will sharpen up my riding techniques and reflexes somewhat. Or....I will just end up finishing off my bad knees.

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I've heard lots of pro racers either started with trials riding or have a trials bike to practice on. I've got a few questions pertaining to them,

1. Will this only help on slow speed obstacles like rocks/logs?

2. If I don't have any obstacles to practice on, just flat ground, can I still get something out of it?

3. Can't really think of anything else right now haha

1. It will help at all speeds and over all terrain...Knighter has a strong trials background, as does Taddy, etc...

2. Absolutly learning to do full-lock turns on a trials bike, back to back, and full-lock figure-8's will only help you en every other form of riding - it requires a lot of throttle and clutch control, as well as balance and proper body positoning.

DON'T just buy a trials bike and ride around in circles on it...GO TO A TRIALS event and compete - you will learn more at one trial than in 6 months of plonking around on your own. Most people only do what's easy and fun, and not what they should be working on to get better or acquire the techniques that will take them further in all forms of riding.

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DON'T just buy a trials bike and ride around in circles on it...GO TO A TRIALS event and compete - you will learn more at one trial than in 6 months of plonking around on your own. Most people only do what's easy and fun, and not what they should be working on to get better or acquire the techniques that will take them further in all forms of riding.

Excellent point.

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Same as a Trials bike. It just gets harder as weight and bulk increase. Motorcycles all work the same way, the laws of physics all apply.

Watch a stunter like Chris Pfeiffer or A.C. Farias (who are both experienced Trials riders) sometime. They do it all on street bikes.

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If anyone can elaborate on how to splatter on a mx/enduro bike while on the topic would be good to hear..

https://thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=905893

The Splatter technique is used for extreme under-cut rocks or elevated logs. Most often a small "kicker" object (ie, rock, root) is used to elevate. The basic principal is to lift the front tire 90 degrees or higher (yes beyond vertical) to allow the rear tire to hit the obsticle as high as possible (reason for the kicker) first and the forward momentum will bring the front tire down on top of the obsticle. If you've ever seen anyone pop a wheelie that went beyond vertical and then hit the rear brake, the same principal applies to bring the front back down.

With that said, I've not seen a real reason to do this with a MX/Enduro bike on a log.

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If anyone can elaborate on how to splatter on a mx/enduro bike while on the topic would be good to hear..

https://thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=905893

here's a picture sequence where i'm using the "splatter" technique, i've got alot more of a "kicker" then most trials riders would use for this technique, but the obstacle is alot taller and the take off point alot closer then ideal as well, but the techniques still the same, bikes a KX250F, not the heaviest bike in the world, but show's you can use the techniques on full size mx/enduro bikes.

mirboomototrailsoz66.jpg

mirboomototrailsoz67.jpg

mirboomototrailsoz68.jpg

mirboomototrailsoz69.jpg

i don't have a trials bike to train on, but i do practice trials techniques on my full sized bikes, they defiantly do help.

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The Splatter technique is used for extreme under-cut rocks or elevated logs. Most often a small "kicker" object (ie, rock, root) is used to elevate. The basic principal is to lift the front tire 90 degrees or higher (yes beyond vertical) to allow the rear tire to hit the obsticle as high as possible (reason for the kicker) first and the forward momentum will bring the front tire down on top of the obsticle. If you've ever seen anyone pop a wheelie that went beyond vertical and then hit the rear brake, the same principal applies to bring the front back down.

With that said, I've not seen a real reason to do this with a MX/Enduro bike on a log.

Think you have to use abit of clutch work in there too.

Get Ryan Young's trials techniques DVD it is really good.

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I don't have a trials bike to train on, but i do practice trials techniques on my full sized bikes, they defiantly do help.

Well I guess they're not just Trials techniques then are they? You would obviously do well in a Trials competition on your KX with your riding skills.

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I appreciate the replies! I've been watching quite a few trials videos and trying to put the techniques to the test, the double blip works pretty well over a large tank I ride like a log.

What's a good beginners bike? I know of Gas Gas, Sherco, and Beta but not sure about differences in brands and models really

What's your take on this bike? http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/1996-Gas-Gas-JTR-160-Trials-Bike-/110566589441?pt=US_motorcycles#ht_500wt_844

It's 14 years old and they want 1800 for it though, are all trials bike that pricy?

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I appreciate the replies! I've been watching quite a few trials videos and trying to put the techniques to the test, the double blip works pretty well over a large tank I ride like a log.

What's a good beginners bike? I know of Gas Gas, Sherco, and Beta but not sure about differences in brands and models really

What's your take on this bike? http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/1996-Gas-Gas-JTR-160-Trials-Bike-/110566589441?pt=US_motorcycles#ht_500wt_844

It's 14 years old and they want 1800 for it though, are all trials bike that pricy?

I think you can find better.

This site may helphttp://www.trialscentral.com/forums/index.php?showforum=4

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It's hard to find any trials bikes for sale, let alone one for a good price. I kept finding them on CL, but if they were any good they were snapped up before I even had a chance to see them. I finally found a 2001 TXT for 1500 bucks. It was extremely rashed out, but ran good so I bought it.

same here... looked for almost a year to find my txt 200 pro gas gas..

found it on a trials club website in the classifieds. had to go 350 miles to get it, but well worth the time.. i have 2.5 acres at home and building a practice course at home... fun bike, really helps on balance.. broke my ankle 2 weeks ago, but plan on doing an event within a year..

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