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How to Fix Stripped Drain Plug

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I'm trying to help my friend fix the drain plug on his 96 DR650. On the second oil change (since he bougth the bike about a year ago with 36K on the odometer) we discovered the plug had been repaired with some copper metal added (it looked very wierd). It didn't hold, (oil leaked badly) and we could see that the threads on the hole were badly damaged, so we tried to tap out the drain plug opening using an 18mm tap-we got a matching 18mm drain plug from Kragens with the same thread pitch. The tap cut some good threads but the plug was way too loose. Im not that familiar with taps, so was I correct to assume that the size of the bolt should match the tap? Should we try again with a 20mm plug and maybe a 19mm tap or is there a better solution? I'm concerned that the opening is getting too large and might be weak.

thanks,

dave

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Helicoil method. Sold at hardware stores, then use a bolt with the propper thread(for plug) and maybe an o-ring or crush washer. Or they do make rubber plugs with a lever on them that expand into the drain hole, for this purpose(like boat drain plugs kinda). I would do the helicoil thing myself, that is if re-tapping wouldn't work. Good luck. TJ

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Check into a USA manufacturer called Timesert, they deal in solid core inserts, rather than inferior spiral wound thread inserts. Measure your crankcase thickness and have your facts and figures available and ask to speak to a technical rep for advice.

Timesert.com

996DL

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If you have the resources and time Ide say yank the pan, take it to a local shop and have them weld in a new bung with whatever size plug makes ya happy.

That being said..I would probably end up going the thread tape,silicon,and 60 second apoxy route!

But it pays to do it right!

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If you have the resources and time Ide say yank the pan, take it to a local shop and have them weld in a new bung with whatever size plug makes ya happy.

That being said..I would probably end up going the thread tape,silicon,and 60 second apoxy route!

But it pays to do it right!

There isn't a 'pan' to yank. The drain plug is threaded into a boss on the rhight hand crankcase half. Getting it welded would require a complete engine tear down.

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Well we took the easy way out and JB welded the plug back into the case. We checked to see if a tube inserted into the fill plug hole would be able to reach the oil so that it could be sucked out for oil changes, and it can. Hey, it's an old bike with lots of miles.....I just hope the JB weld holds up and doesn't crack.

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Well we took the easy way out and JB welded the plug back into the case. We checked to see if a tube inserted into the fill plug hole would be able to reach the oil so that it could be sucked out for oil changes, and it can. Hey, it's an old bike with lots of miles.....I just hope the JB weld holds up and doesn't crack.

NOTE: I HAVE NOT TRIED THIS... but a friend who's been wrenching his bikes forever had suggested the same thing to me. He's done it with success.

DIFFERENCE -- he tapped the hole with the JB weld for another drain plug.

Just fyi, a stripped drain plug was the reason I bought a torque wrench. At the time, I just had the drain plug hole widened for a bigger bolt. This was on a Yamaha 125 and it was fine until I sold the bike a couple of years later.

OPINION: I'd opt for the helicoil, or else buy another engine case (expensive). All else is a kludge (not that there's anything wrong with that), so it depends on whether you want "correct" or "it will work."

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I would recommend NOT using a Heli-coil for a drain-plug. Use a solid thread insert, like mentioned above Timesert or whatever. Be sure to use a good thread locking compound, many are already used on the inserts and activated by the heat and pressure of installation. Heli-coils are a great device but not great for all applications.

Additionally, you may find with some research a self-tapping drain-plug that is over-sized. your application maybe???

The cheap get through for a while is teflon tape wrapped tightly around the plug and or JB weld (marine-tex is better). GL.

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Unless you somehow removed every trace of oil I wouldn't count on JB being very durable. Autozone sells spark plug repair kits for around $30. One of the solid inserts in the kit is the exact size to fit the drain boss on the DR. The kit comes with everything you need including the tap/reamer and Loc-Tite.

The big bonus is that the DR's drain plug is the same size and thread as a sparkplug. The bike may be old and high mileage, but no sense in trashing the engine due to a half assed repair.

I used the kit on my bike and it's doing good so far (3 oil changes). A Timesert would be the best way to go, but I figured if the kit works on a sparkplug the oil drain should be easy.

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Speaking of which, i used timesert and it works very well. Anyone strip their drain threads and want the timesert kit, PM me :-)

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Theres a  mesh above the hole on dr drain pan ..bit worried if i acvidently drilled this ..can anyone confirm bout the mesh being there 

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