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I see most trials riders with the bars significantly farther forward than you would have them on an offroad bike. Is there a standard starting point for bar position? What are the advantages?

Thanks for the help.

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The bar forward position really helps with controlling the front end. I don't know the physics behind it but it makes leveraging by using your arms easier. You can get the front up much easier.

I would start with a neutral position first, make it comfortable for you and adjust from there.

Another good rule of thumb for a starting position is too make the bars level from the side.

The farthest forward I have ever seen a set of bars was TT's own Laser. One time I saw his bars were almost on his front fender. It made him faster too...

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The bar forward position really helps with controlling the front end. I don't know the physics behind it but it makes leveraging by using your arms easier. You can get the front up much easier.

I would start with a neutral position first, make it comfortable for you and adjust from there.

Another good rule of thumb for a starting position is too make the bars level from the side.

The farthest forward I have ever seen a set of bars was TT's own Laser. One time I saw his bars were almost on his front fender. It made him faster too...

LOL:thumbsup::bonk:

Bars forward - More weight on front wheel - helps FT wheel tracking and easier for rear hops

Bars Back - more weight on rear - can help with rear traction in the slippery stuff.

The new bikes seem to like a bar forward position (GG's especially) but play around with it. Just make sure your clamps are TIGHT!:foul:

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I had noticed that the experts all had their bars way forward when I used to compete years ago. I had tried it, but found that it made it very hard for me to balance and control the front end in turns. I guess maybe because I'm not very tall. Anyway, I ended up with them at about a teeny smidge back from straight up.:bonk:

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I attended a trials training day some years ago ... the tutor suggesting setting bars up so that an imaginary line drawn down from along the riser part of the bars touched the back of the front wheel (see diagram). Adjust to suit from that point. Further forward = more sensitive steering, better for the pros for doing splatters etc, further back = less sensitive steering but can result in less weight than necessary on the front end for steep climbs and can end up feeling to cramped for full lock turns. I set my bike to this 'setting' and it's perfect.

Andrew

barsetup.jpg

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Keep a wrench with you and take the time to stop and fool with positions. There is allways going to be some sort of compromise and by moving them around you learn what those are. I thought I had mine perfect untill I got on long steep inclines. I could not keep the front down and stay in controll at the same time. A click looser on fork compression and a tad foward on the bars made it to where I can finally make this loose climb I've been attempting for months.

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.......

The farthest forward I have ever seen a set of bars was TT's own Laser. One time I saw his bars were almost on his front fender. It made him faster too...

..... I KNOW THAT TRICK!!! But makes your hair stand on end until you either crash or pull out of it. Did that on my 83 SWM 350 Jumbo.. Probably worst bike you could do it on cause I think I broke the sound barrier in less than 50 feet!!! Looking like a road racer laying on what was left of the bars.. :foul::bonk:

I learned to use valve grinding compound under my bar clamps after that one!

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I attended a trials training day some years ago ... the tutor suggesting setting bars up so that an imaginary line drawn down from along the riser part of the bars touched the back of the front wheel (see diagram). Adjust to suit from that point. Further forward = more sensitive steering, better for the pros for doing splatters etc, further back = less sensitive steering but can result in less weight than necessary on the front end for steep climbs and can end up feeling to cramped for full lock turns. I set my bike to this 'setting' and it's perfect.

Andrew

barsetup.jpg

BINGO!! I run them like that for trail rides and a little forward of that for Trials Sections or steeper mountain rides with lots of steps or log jumps. :bonk:

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During the Ryan Young school, he sets the bars far forward for better leverage for nose wheelies.

It sounds like I had a Laser-like experience last week on the first ride of the brand new GasGas 300. The bars rotated forward trying to jap-zap a big log. I couldn't reach the levers but easily got the throttle wide open. :bonk: 25ft later a tree brought all the chaos to an abrupt stop... so much for worrying about scratching the new bike.

Lesson learned: make sure bar clamps are very tight even when trying to determine the "proper" position.

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During the Ryan Young school, he sets the bars far forward for better leverage for nose wheelies.

It sounds like I had a Laser-like experience last week on the first ride of the brand new GasGas 300. The bars rotated forward trying to jap-zap a big log. I couldn't reach the levers but easily got the throttle wide open. :D 25ft later a tree brought all the chaos to an abrupt stop... so much for worrying about scratching the new bike.

Lesson learned: make sure bar clamps are very tight even when trying to determine the "proper" position.

That low and forward, hands heavy, position really holds you on the bike doesnt it-a totally helpless feeling. Not fun. Sounds like you escaped w/o injury. :bonk: Trees work great for stopping.:foul:

I use the old style GG bar clamps now (big heavy blocks) - they have a larger clampable area than any of the new gen bar clamps. I also check them on a regular basis now and use thread locker instead of anti seize on the bolts.

My dad loaned out his bike to a local expert and he setup up the bars REALLY far forward. Makes my "forward" position look like a twin shock setup.

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