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winter riding help

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Okay, so I have been laid up with casts for the last 4 months and Tuesday I get them off and I get cleared to ride. My bike is torn apart getting cleaned and new bearings and stuff. I live in a pretty snowy place. I have been skiing about 18 times now (yes with casts) and I really want to ride. And whats a better way to stay in shape for the oncoming season? Well, I want to give snow riding a try.

I need ideas and advice on what to use. Like tires/studs, gear and bike set up. I want quick and easy mods that wont burn a huge hole in my pocket.

so first i want to stud my tires. I have a pair of half used that are laying around so i was planning on using them. I dont want to spend the money on real studs, so can I just use some screws from the hardware store? If so, what kind. Do I use washers or lock tite or anything. How do I put them in (any instructions would be awesome) And do i stud front and back?

Next, do I need to set my suspension different? Like softer or slower rebound or something? (set for a 140 lb A enduro rider). Any other mods I may need or change?

Gear. I am planning on my normal boots with heavy socks, nice snowmobile gloves, a jecket and all the other normal gear. Should I buy anything special?

Any ideas or imput is really appreciated!

Thanks, Seezy:thumbsup:

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Okay, so I have been laid up with casts for the last 4 months and Tuesday I get them off and I get cleared to ride. My bike is torn apart getting cleaned and new bearings and stuff. I live in a pretty snowy place. I have been skiing about 18 times now (yes with casts) and I really want to ride. And whats a better way to stay in shape for the oncoming season? Well, I want to give snow riding a try.

I need ideas and advice on what to use. Like tires/studs, gear and bike set up. I want quick and easy mods that wont burn a huge hole in my pocket.

so first i want to stud my tires. I have a pair of half used that are laying around so i was planning on using them. I dont want to spend the money on real studs, so can I just use some screws from the hardware store? If so, what kind. Do I use washers or lock tite or anything. How do I put them in (any instructions would be awesome) And do i stud front and back?

Next, do I need to set my suspension different? Like softer or slower rebound or something? (set for a 140 lb A enduro rider). Any other mods I may need or change?

Gear. I am planning on my normal boots with heavy socks, nice snowmobile gloves, a jecket and all the other normal gear. Should I buy anything special?

Any ideas or imput is really appreciated!

Thanks, Seezy:thumbsup:

1/2 inch KoldKutters from Dennis Kirk is what alot of guys around here run.

No loctite or washers, just run them in snug with a cordless drill. Most guys put screws in front and rear. You may look into grip heaters. That's the only part of me that gets cold during winter riding. Hope this helps:thumbsup:

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When you say you want to try riding in the snow, do you mean on road in the snow, offroad trails in the snow, or on ice (frozen lake)? Each one of these will require a different setup for best performance.

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When you say you want to try riding in the snow, do you mean on road in the snow, offroad trails in the snow, or on ice (frozen lake)? Each one of these will require a different setup for best performance.

on trails. roads are boring and i am not into ice

:putnam:

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Something like the Michelin or Trelleborgs would probably be your best bet. These could also be ridin on glare ice, but you won't have the best traction when cornering.

http://www.motorace.com/miva/merchant.mv?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=M&Category_Code=SWT

I have also heard of some people using these on pavement... They do have carbide tips, but I wouldn't recommend it.

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I use kold kutters on the rear and sheet metal screws on the front, 5/8" and 1/2" respectively. I use tubliss so I don't have to worry about popping the tube--you might want to go with 1/2" and 3/8" to be safe. You can use sheet metal screws (hex head) on the rear, too, but they aren't as agressive and wear down faster.

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Kold Kutters work great on ice and ice only. Anything else and you will be replacing them every other ride due to excessive wear. Same thing with the sheet metal screws.

If you plan to ride a lot, the Michelin/Trelly's are the way to go. You will get much better grip than screws.

If you decide to go with the screws; 1/2" screws will pull out very easily. Heck, just riding on the ice will cause them to pull out. Dirt, logs, rocks will be even worse. 5/8" would be better, but on most tires you will probably be through the carcass. Take an old street tire that is the same size (18"/19") and cut the side walls off. Track take offs work the best and you can usually get them for free from some shops. Use this as a liner inside your dirt/ice tire. Now you can use up to 1-1/4" screws. But remember, if you are just out tooling around, anything could work, at least a little bit. If you are planning some serious riding or racing, I would go with tires that match the situation.

Oh, and don't forget tire wraps to keep the screws nice and sharp...if that is what you decide.

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Here is a post from a different thread with a couple more links. Looking at the Fredette tires, you can see how the screws would work better on ice.

You have a few options:

Studded tires (offroad/trail/woods) Trelleborg:http://www.motorace.com/miva/merchan...egory_Code=SWT

Screws (ice only, no snow, racing):http://www.frpoffroad.com/browse.htm...atalogId=-1039

Deep snow:http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/sho...ight=ice+studs

Studded tire like the Trelleborgs can be used on ice, but you won't be able to drag pegs. Wear armor, because you will fall often...unless you only ride in a straight line.

If the winter enduro that you are looking to partake in is a woods/trail (snow covered dirt), the Trelleborg style tires are the best way to go. If this is on bare ice, you will want a good set of ice racing tires such as the Fredette tires. Ice racing tires can never be riden on anything other than ice...no dirt, pavement, rock, etc... On and off the bike hauling device, you will need tire wraps.

I have two sets of tires for this winter. One set of ice racing tires for bare ice only and a set of Kenda K760s with tapcon concrete screws for everything else.

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thanks everyone...just got my casts off and im ready to ride. o wait i still have surgery :thumbsup: but i will soon put so studs in. i will experiment with all your different ideas and report back with my results

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If you will be hitting the occasional rock, don't use screws (from the outside in) on your rear tire. They will all come out.

If you are just in snow and on ice, then they'll be fine for a while.

I use concrete screws and/or self tapping screws drilled from the inside out (so that the pointy end is what's hitting the ground). You can drill pilot holes through your knobs as a way to mark where to put the screws. This method works well for any condition. You can put hex head screws on the farthest outside knobs just for cornering on ice.

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a set of Kenda K760s with tapcon concrete screws for everything else.

I use concrete screws and/or self tapping screws drilled from the inside out (so that the pointy end is what's hitting the ground). You can drill pilot holes through your knobs as a way to mark where to put the screws. This method works well for any condition. You can put hex head screws on the farthest outside knobs just for cornering on ice.

how do these tires work on ice?

I'm planning on going this route since they won't come out, and there's less concern about the length of the screw penetrating the tube

I can romp around a grassy backyard when it's snowing, get some traction on the trails, and occasionally take a loop around the ice?

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Its hard to break them loose on ice. I found they're almost too grabby up front unless in deeper snow.

The best is bush whacking and log jumping. You can do no wrong running over fallen trees because of the grip.

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hmm...it looks like Tocramed has the right idea...2 sets of tires to fit the form for the function

or...just keep DOT knobbies for everything...street, dirt, snow...and no ice

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There are snowmobiles for a reason!

I heard that ice tires grab better than regular tires on perfect dirt conditions but I'll have to see when I go riding up on the "lake".

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at least for me, snowmobiles cost a lot more than a set of ice tires, and you need a place a put it and a way to carry it...and a place to ride it. I don't have all 4!

I really can't decide on what I want; I don't even know if I like riding on ice...so maybe this winter I'll ice-stud some knobbies and see if I want to continue that setup for the winter...

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I bought a heated jacket that wires directly to the bike and makes a huge difference by keeping you core warm. Unless snow or ice is on the ground, I can pretty much ride all winter in North Jersey.

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at least for me, snowmobiles cost a lot more than a set of ice tires, and you need a place a put it and a way to carry it...and a place to ride it. I don't have all 4!

I really can't decide on what I want; I don't even know if I like riding on ice...so maybe this winter I'll ice-stud some knobbies and see if I want to continue that setup for the winter...

Well, if you ride dirt trails in the winter (snow covered of course), try the Trackmasters with Tapcon screws. They are great for trails and will work on ice too...just not as good as ice screws. Trust me, once you are on the ice, you will love it.

Run one Tapcon screws into the tire (from the outside in) per lug. Do them all first, then pull them back out. The friction of the screws going in and out will warm and loosen the rubber pulling some out with the screw if you don't let them cool a bit. Not much, but why chance it. Then get all the screws started from the inside. This is very time consuming and tedious. I use a manual racheting screwdriver and turn them in just to the point of the tip poking out of the lug. Once done, I use a powered drill to drive them home. Cut up an old tube and glue over the heads of the screws to protect the tube.

For ice racing tires with hex head screws...I made mine, but that took 12-14 hours of just driving in screws. Another 6-8 playing with the street tires to make a liner that works. Save yourself the time, Fredette. Send him your wheels and he will mount them for you too...that alone took two people including all my weight on the tire to get it on.

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