New plates, steel or aluminum?

Next poll from the new guy :thumbsup:

I bought a used 2000 CR250, just in time for Illinois winter. It's been cared for very well by the previous owner but it's seen plenty of ride time. I have all winter to prep it for next spring. Front forks and rear shock were just rebuilt , resprung, and revalved by Factory Connection, I just went through the swingarm pivot and linkage and it's all tight and lubed. The Wiseco pro-lite top end has 12 hours on it now so nothing to do there just yet, reeds look great, chain and sprockets are looking good, new pads front and rear,new chain slider,guide and rollers, just added an "Hour Meter", new desert tank, now I'm looking at how far out the clutch cable adjuster is set. I might get into the clutch and measure that up for wear. In the event that it's time for new plates and maybe springs, "What are the pro's and con's of steel vs aluminum"?

Thanx guys,

JJ

Not that the adjuster means there's alot of wear, just fired that synapse for me is all.

Not that the adjuster means there's alot of wear, just fired that synapse for me is all.

Lol...funny how that works. :thumbsup:

Aluminum plates will make the tranny oil darker and "contaminate" it more quickly. Aluminum may be "grabbier" than steel, but steel last a long time; aluminum will wear faster.

If weight and/or flywheel affect is of no real concern, I'd go steel.

I thought I read somewhere that some mfr had aluminum plates that were coated to wear better, but can't remember who it was.

Well, people pay for a dozen ounces of flywheel weight for the woods. Until now, I never thought about that snappy throttle response as a bad thing on the trail but that doesn't mean I wasn't missing out... I've learned to love instantaneous throttle response but how much will steel plates affect? I was hoping someone would start with this because I know this is the largest impact it would have since I'm not supercross boy and I don't clutch it in every turn.

JJ

I use just the standard factory clutch parts, they work fine for me.

The clutch turns at less than 1/2 the speed of the crank therefore weight of the clutch plates is less than 1/2 as important as the same amount of weight on the crankshaft assembly. Use steel and don't worry about the weight, wear will be far longer.

Any time I replace a clutch I use steel plates.

The weight doesn't matter about the choise between steel and aluminium. It's only the fact about clutch control. It's about the differences of the static and dynamic friction coefficient. With steel plates the difference is greater so you don't get as much control while slipping as with some or only aluminium plates.

You should choose based on your riding style and application if you need this extra control. Perhaps some of us won't feel the difference but some are quite sensitive.

Regards,

nths

I'm thinking a 40+ rider, myself included, isn't as interested in clutch control as he is oil life. The contamination of oil from the aluminum plates has always been the main concern to me.

I'm thinking a 40+ rider, myself included, isn't as interested in clutch control as he is oil life. The contamination of oil from the aluminum plates has always been the main concern to me.

I think we're in the same camp. I'll adjust to steel which is what my previous bikes had anyway,if it means less junk in the oil. I was surprised how quickly the oil gets the aluminum content that it does.

Thanx guys for all the input as usual everyone. :thumbsup:

JJ

As long as you stick with Honda clutch plates the difference in modulation with steel is minimal and you trans oil will stay much cleaner and your clutch will last longer. The aluminum plates contaminate the oil in one good ride if you slip the clutch out of turns!

As long as you stick with Honda clutch plates the difference in modulation with steel is minimal and you trans oil will stay much cleaner and your clutch will last longer. The aluminum plates contaminate the oil in one good ride if you slip the clutch out of turns!

Do you mean Honda driven and drive plates? The Honda stack? Not a complaint, sounds like good advice and I want to be sure I read it right.

Thanx,

JJ

I switched from the aluminum plates to steel plates this past summer. The aluminum does grab a bit more when slipping the clutch compared to the steel plates. I have noticed a great deal in oil color when I change the oil. I used Amsoil and with aluminum plates the oil would be dark gray, almost metallic. Now with steel plates the oil is still a semi golden color. I guess I'm still stuck on the idea of changing the oil a lot like I did with my RMZ250. hahaha

I see Barnett it still in the clutch business, anyone experience their steel clutch kits, or should I stick with Honda steel plates and stock springs? I'm 250lbs and I've caused clutch slippage on a bike or 2 lol. I notice the OEM honda clutch has 2 steel plates and the balance are aluminum. Would I simply order seven of the steel plates from the Honda part diagram? I imagine they're identical aside from the material.

I replaced the clutch plates on my 98cr250 last summer. Ordered honda, all of them steel. I realy did not notice much of a flywheel effect or any difference in clutch operation. Certainly noticed the difference when changing tranny oil.

I see Barnett it still in the clutch business, anyone experience their steel clutch kits, or should I stick with Honda steel plates and stock springs? I'm 250lbs and I've caused clutch slippage on a bike or 2 lol. I notice the OEM honda clutch has 2 steel plates and the balance are aluminum. Would I simply order seven of the steel plates from the Honda part diagram? I imagine they're identical aside from the material.

Honda clutch components are better than Barnett. After years you trying aftermarket clutch plates, I only use OEM now.

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