XR250 electrical power for GPS

So,does anyone know how I can hook up my GPS on my XR250 ?

I found a handle bar mount but I need ether 12 volt dc for the cig. plug or the unit takes 5 volts to keep it charged up.

Maybe this is a stupid question but I'm sure I'm not the only one that wants to do this.

I have a GPS mount on my dual sported XR250R.

If the bike has a dual sport kit installed, it will have a voltage regulator that converts the bike's electrical output from the unusable AC to 12DC.

However, the available stators (Ricky Stator at least) for the XR250 are pretty much crap. They max out at 150W, and need to be revved to 4k-5k in order to make much power. This confuses the unit when going from low to hi rpm... unless you have a really good battery that can store a lot of power in reserve.

My advice would be to set it up for a voltage regulator, find a decent stator with acceptable lower rpm output, even though it might not have as much peak power (not Ricky Stator) and get a battery with decent reserve capacity. The battery packs made out of rechargable AA batteries are pretty much junk. There are some fairly small batteries that a guy on the CRF230F forum uses that work really well. I believe his name is ExploringWA. He has a thread about lightening his CRF230F by over 40lbs. Information on the battery can be found in that thread, as I'm thinking about upgrading to one.

Either that.... or just rely on the GPS's own battery. It will get you around 2hrs of run time. That's what I do now... even though I wired up a cigarette ligter to plug it into.

Good Luck!

As Mike suggests, you'll need to set up the system for DC, but with a rectifier. You already have a voltage regulator. There are several places where you can get a regulator/rectifier. I've had good performance from the TrailTech one.

Just wire it in, in place of the stock regulator. If you're not dualsporting your bike/making it street legal, you can probably get away without needing a battery in the system, as a GPS draws very little power. I think most GPSes have a DC input cable/pigtail available. Just wire the other end of that directly into you're lighting harness. I say forget the cig plug idea for a trail bike. Those have been known to cause intermittent power issues when riding trail/rough terrain.

If you're not dualsporting your bike/making it street legal, you can probably get away without needing a battery in the system, as a GPS draws very little power. I think most GPSes have a DC input cable/pigtail available. Just wire the other end of that directly into you're lighting harness. I say forget the cig plug idea for a trail bike. Those have been known to cause intermittent power issues when riding trail/rough terrain.

I've plugged a voltmeter into my system, and the DC voltage is ALL OVER THE PLACE throughout the rpm range... especially with the headlight on. At idle, it can be as low as 2-4V, which isn't even recognized by the GPS. At around 4k rpm, it's up to around 12V or so.

What happens, is when the bike is run at lower rpm for a bit, the gps thinks the 12V has come unplugged, and gives you a prompt on the screen whether you want it to stay on or not. Sometimes, if you rev it back up, it sees the voltage, and the prompt goes away. Other times, it goes off after 30 seconds. Then, later when it sees higher voltage again, it comes on automatically. All the ons/offs/prompts are distracting and drive you crazy. I eventually just quit using the 12V cord, and only turn it on when I need it... as there are around 2hrs of battery time.

The Ricky Stator sucks, as it works WORSE than the stock one below around 4k rpm. Only above that, does it start to work better. They use larger wire in order to carry more current, but the larger wires allow for fewer turns around the poles... limiting inductance and lower rpm output. Instead of the 150W peak at high rpm, I'd rather have 100-120W or so, and have decent lower rpm output. I believe some of the re-winders can do this... and is probably why they advertise less peak power than the Ricky Stator unit.

I think I'll need to install a GOOD battery that has a LOT of reserve power in order to make my Ricky Stator semi useful. Right now, my 55W headlight and tail light will kill the battery pack in a minute or two in traffic, as they get pretty much ZERO help from the Ricky Stator at idle.

Good Luck!

There ya go Crazy. You'll need to install a battery for consistent voltage. So far, I'm having good luck with the TrailTech 3.7amp battery pack.

I've plugged a voltmeter into my system, and the DC voltage is ALL OVER THE PLACE throughout the rpm range... especially with the headlight on.

Thanks for all the input . I talked to my buddy that owns a battery store ,well 6 of them and he said he'd help out.

Thinking of doing a rechargeable battery that would last all day then recharge it like a dewalt drill . I have a boat load of old Makita batteries and chargers so it's just a matter of him taking them apart and installing new battery cells.

We're going to try something simple like a back up power that straps to the bike ,no stators or rewiring of the bike ,I don't like smoking wires.

How many posts before I loose the Newbie status ? :thumbsup:

There ya go Crazy. You'll need to install a battery for consistent voltage. So far, I'm having good luck with the TrailTech 3.7amp battery pack.

I have the battery pack that came with the Baja Designs Dual Sport Kit, but with pretty much zero help from the stator at idle speeds, it's drained in about a single minute when you come to an idle.

A stator with less peak watts, but better low rpm performance would work MUCH better. My STOCK stator worked better than this one at lower rpm, and it still had two poles that weren't wound yet!

The Ricky Stator for the XR250R is the highest rated, power wise, but it needs to be revved up to around 4-5k rpm to do much... which makes it pretty much useless.

I have looked into the better batteries....

What GPS?

All of the above issues is why I don't power my GPS from the bike, I use a Garmin GPS that has an 18 hour battery life and it keeps life simple.

Bike charging systems need two thing to provide stable voltage for electronic accessories; regulation and filtration. A good battery or a capacitor provide the filter and allows the regulator to do its job; added weight and complexity that I didn't want.

n20Mike, sorry to hear you are unhappy with the performance of the stator you purchased from us. let me offer you a refund on the stator or rewind it to a configuration that better suits you?

n20Mike, sorry to hear you are unhappy with the performance of the stator you purchased from us. let me offer you a refund on the stator or rewind it to a configuration that better suits you?

Now, as it's winter and the bike is put away, that might be an option.

How do I get ahold of you in order to send it back?

Headlight is 55W, standard bulbs in the taillight and signals.

GPS is the only accessory.

Thanks

Mike

There are a lot of us that have done what TR42 suggest, and that is to install a 12 volt regulator/rectifier to convert to DC power then install a small NiMH battery pack under the seat to smooth out the voltage peaks AND IT WORKS! :thumbsup:

A Garmin GPS is only going to draw less than 2 watts... how hard can this be to maintain? From any kind of battery.

BDupgrade007.jpg

It's funny how the harder you work at doing something right... the luckier you get! :blah:

Perc

Nice setup! Can you share more details? What works for those of us with the BD dual sport setup?

I was reading a post a few days ago where the author describes what he has found with the windings and output. Basically if you want big output you need to have it higher in the rev range where as if you want constant output the total will be reduced dramatically but you can have a couple of amps steady over the entire range. Bigger wire is in there somewhere Excel files and all the equations that you would need. What size caps you need to go battery less too. I did a search but see it straight away, I did read to about page 60 of the forum, it was in there somewhere.

n20Mike, sorry to hear you are unhappy with the performance of the stator you purchased from us. let me offer you a refund on the stator or rewind it to a configuration that better suits you?

I like that . Standing behind your product 110% Right on ! :thumbsup:

Fill us in on more details Perc82 .

I like that . Standing behind your product 110% Right on ! :thumbsup:

Fill us in on more details Perc82 .

More details huh? :blah:

I don't know what the stock stator output is on the XR250's, but if all you are trying add to your power load is a GPS then the stock stator will do fine.

You will need to replace your stock voltage regulator with a "voltage regulator/rectifier" the "rectifier" part is the key to DC power. Think of it as a voltage check valve, it only lets voltage pass through in one direction so NO Alternating Current!

Then you need to tie the positive and negative wires from the "Voltage reg/rect" to a battery pack to buffer the voltage swings and supply constant ~13 volt to everything. (it really does run 13 to 13.5 volts)

I also agree with the statement that you need the hard wire for your GPS and not a 12 volt power outlet. The power outlets will constantly vibrate loose causing you to lose connection turning off your GPS.

Here is a copy of my modified wiring diagram for a XR400 with both AC & DC circuts... Note I have a 12 volt power outlet shown and I now have a GPS hard wire coming from the battery!:ride:

XR400wiring.jpg?t=1292282997

Perc

Edited by Perc82

Here is an answer to questions regarding number of turns and wire size prepared by an EE and posted on the adventure rider forum Stators Dymystified

There are a lot of us that have done what TR42 suggest, and that is to install a 12 volt regulator/rectifier to convert to DC power then install a small NiMH battery pack under the seat to smooth out the voltage peaks AND IT WORKS! :thumbsup:

A Garmin GPS is only going to draw less than 2 watts... how hard can this be to maintain? From any kind of battery.

BDupgrade007.jpg

It's funny how the harder you work at doing something right... the luckier you get! :blah:

Perc

I like this idea .. with out wireing into any of the bikes 12 volt regulator/rectifier

A simple NiMH battery pack under the seat 2500 mil amp can be had at the local hobby store thats used on r/c planes a 6 volt unit is like 22 bucks and is easyly recharged .. hook uo to a removable power cord and rout up the handle bar mount .

yes the Garmen hand helds are pricey but far better then a standard unit you use in the car .

from the looks of what i have seen there more defined for hikers and such .. better detail .. but in the 300 buck range . claims of 18 hr battry life too .

there almost invaluable when your out in no mans land .. will get you back to the camp ... makes it most enjoyable about wandering out exploring and not worring about getting lost .

Don

Just trying to get my little brain around this electrical stuff... I have a BD kit with a 12V battery fixed behind the headlight assembly. I want to power a Rhino 120, which I believe requires 3.5V. My understanding is that I need to reduce the voltage from the battery to meet the requirement of the GPS unit, correct? How would I accomplish this?

I think most GPS'es are spec'ed for a voltage "range" they'll work with. Tho, I'm reading that the Rino doesn't have that feature. So you need an adapter that has a voltage step down feature built in, like this one:

http://www.amazon.com/GARMIN-010-10326-00-12V-Adapter-Cable/dp/B00008IHNG

I want to power a Rhino 120, which I believe requires 3.5V. My understanding is that I need to reduce the voltage from the battery to meet the requirement of the GPS unit, correct? How would I accomplish this?

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