seals got replaced, now somethings wronge?!

so i have a 2009 wr250f and i blew my seals..i just got them replaced and now when i compress the fork they dont come back up what so ever..im really pissed off about this:foul:..i also installed seal savers

Did you put the springs back in LOL

a shop did the install..not me and i hope they did!..when you hit the shaft you can hear somethin rattling in there(i guess the spring?)

It's amazing how incompetent some shops are these days. Bring it back and tell them to make it right.

so i have a 2009 wr250f and i blew my seals..i just got them replaced and now when i compress the fork they dont come back up what so ever..im really pissed off about this:foul:..i also installed seal savers

Often times the problem comes from improper installation of the axle and axle pinch nuts.

Loosen the axle nut all the way and then try and compress and rebound. If it works ok, that is your problem.

Try dialing the rebound all the way back out some shops close it off when doing forks

Your axle should float free in the right axle clamp before tightening the pinch bolts. If the fork tube is forced inboard or outboard, the tubes won't be parallel and they will bind.

You can achieve this by lifting the bike up on the stand and loosening the axle pinch bolts on the right side. You should be able to slide the fork tube back and forth a little on the axle, and it should find its sweet spot. If it does not move freely, you can take it off the stand and compress the forks several times and wiggle them side to side. Most bikes the big end of the axle is almost flush with the fork, but they're all different.

Another thing people do is use a hex axle tool to turn the axle from the right side. This also allows it to find the correct spot.

Once you find the correct position, notice how flush it is with the axle, then you can always check visually when you put on a front wheel.

My apologies if you already understand all this stuff. I don't mean to insult your intelligence, just give my 2 cents.

-Toby

Your axle should float free in the right axle clamp before tightening the pinch bolts. If the fork tube is forced inboard or outboard, the tubes won't be parallel and they will bind.

You can achieve this by lifting the bike up on the stand and loosening the axle pinch bolts on the right side. You should be able to slide the fork tube back and forth a little on the axle, and it should find its sweet spot. If it does not move freely, you can take it off the stand and compress the forks several times and wiggle them side to side. Most bikes the big end of the axle is almost flush with the fork, but they're all different.

Another thing people do is use a hex axle tool to turn the axle from the right side. This also allows it to find the correct spot.

Once you find the correct position, notice how flush it is with the axle, then you can always check visually when you put on a front wheel.

My apologies if you already understand all this stuff. I don't mean to insult your intelligence, just give my 2 cents.

-Toby

+1! I drive a small screwdriver partly into the right side to separate the pinch clamp. With the bike on the stand, spin the front wheel fast and apply the front brake several times. This will force the right fork to find the sweet spot. Remove the screwdriver and tighten the pinch bolts.

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