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pretty dumb suspension question.

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I just bought a used 2007 YZ250 in really great shape. I have owned several dirt bikes in the past and have never really messed with the suspension settings let alone the springs. I do not ride competitively at all. I do not do any big jumps or anything like that. I really enjoy trail riding with a little bit of woops and some small jumps here and there. Is it very important that I start paying more attention to the spring rates or just mess with the settings with the springs I have? I don't know if its worth it to invest in a bunch of expensive springs just for the type of riding I do. I weigh about 230 lbs with out gear, and am about 5'-10" tall. What do you guys think?????

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Not a dumb question at all, and that's what these forums are for. A good suspension makes riding much more enjoyable, and for a racer, it's a necessity to be competitive.

For a recreational rider, getting your suspension close to your personal preferences does not automatically involve changing springs, although for your size, you should consider it.

Adjusting clickers and oil levels are practically free, and even an oil change can really make a difference.

So, do you have to change things? Of course not, but a little time spent can enhance your riding experience.

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You're a big guy and will probably need stiffer springs. You MUST get the right spring rates before moving on to anything else. Check out the Sticky at the top of this Forum page. Read and head.

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you will need springs, for play riding the yz is a much better valved bike than most.

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I just bought a used 2007 YZ250 in really great shape. I have owned several dirt bikes in the past and have never really messed with the suspension settings let alone the springs. I do not ride competitively at all. I do not do any big jumps or anything like that. I really enjoy trail riding with a little bit of woops and some small jumps here and there. Is it very important that I start paying more attention to the spring rates or just mess with the settings with the springs I have? I don't know if its worth it to invest in a bunch of expensive springs just for the type of riding I do. I weigh about 230 lbs with out gear, and am about 5'-10" tall. What do you guys think?????

If you're just play riding, I don't think you 'need' springs. Go ride it, and if you're happy with it, why change it? Like Leardriver said, springs might make the ride more enjoyable since the suspension will be working for your specific weight, and may save you from some mistakes, but you don't 'need' to get springs, and you definitely don't need a revalve. Try adjusting your clickers, turn the compression and rebound clockwise a couple clicks at a time and see if that feels a little more responsive and less sloppy.

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So far so good. I own a 1999 RM250 too. It rode pretty nice I thought. Then a 2002 YZ250F came into the picture. There is a huge difference in the ride when compared to some jumps and rutty sections of track I ride on. I could be on full throttle with the 2002 and seams to go through like a warm knife through butter. It takes the jumps better too. The 1999 is still a really cool bike but it does not seam to handle like the 2002. It could be the age/technology difference or the power difference and even the suspension settings of spring rate difference. I will look into the spring rates and see what I could come up with. It looks like I should sit on the bike and see a 30 or 33% sag when compared to the overall travel, and take it from there.

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the hardware on the 99 rm wasnt too bad i seem to remember, so it could be made to work well, sag set correctly and with with fresh fluids in the suspension.

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