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Weird/creepy/funny things you've found/seen on the trail

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A friend of mine had a near miss on a mine shaft vent, that claimed a riding buddies life. They decided to not attempt to recover the body due to the danger, so he is effectively, "buried" at the location along with his bike. Its definitely not the only time that has happened...

 

I understand them not wanting to retrieve the body.  I was a rope rescue specialist and trainer/EMT with the Graham County Sheriff's Office, and I would NOT do mine shafts.  When we needed help we called in a guy from Pinal County that was crazy enough to do that.  Great way to become another victim.

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I've never understood why there is no requirement  of some type of flagging, fencing, etc around those holes. No telling how many have found their way down one,,,accidentally, or with some help as has been alleged.

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Haven't found much but weirdest thing me and my father were desert riding years ago, both on 250f's going about 40 mph across some brushed desert, I'm following my father when I see him lock up his brakes and go over the bars. I slam on my brakes and lay it over to not hit him. I asked him why he slammed the brakes on and when the dust settled I seen why, about 4 feet from where he slid to a stop was a open mine shaft. It was a joke about 8x8 in the middle of nowhere. Not marked or anything. We got up and dropped some huge rocks down it and never heard them hit the bottom. We found out it was most likely a vent shaft to exhaust the deep deep down old mine shafts. To this day I think how lucky we are to both not have went down as no one would have ever known.

 

That's a real danger down here.  A buddy and I were out riding and scooting down a desert two track at a pretty good clip.  We went around a curve and had the rear tires sliding out behind us, feeling like we were giving Johnny Campbell a run for his money.  As soon as we straightened out, my buddy (who was about 1/2 bike length ahead of me) came to an abrupt halt and I had to circle back to find out what the deal was.  By the time I got back to him, he was back by the apex of that corner staring down a vent shaft about 6' off the road.  If we'd overcooked that corner or laid it down, it would have been a looong fall.

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I understand them not wanting to retrieve the body.  I was a rope rescue specialist and trainer/EMT with the Graham County Sheriff's Office, and I would NOT do mine shafts.  When we needed help we called in a guy from Pinal County that was crazy enough to do that.  Great way to become another victim.

 

 

Why are mine shafts bad for you guys to go down?

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Why are mine shafts bad for you guys to go down?

 

The danger of collapse, and dangerous, toxic gases, especially H2S

Edited by cjjeepercreeper
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I remember watching a couple of my dads helpers climb down a wooden ladder into a mineshaft. They said after about 100 feet the ladder started to go over vertical so they came back up

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Why are mine shafts bad for you guys to go down?

Cave ins, slick unstable walls, what ever trash is at the bottom, and since you can't clime out you need to walk out a tunnel or get roped out. Mines tend to be labyrinthitis with many levels dead ends toxic gas, hungry rats oh ya your probably hurt from falling, water, and after all that the entrance is most likely dinamighted closed so no one walks in

I've never understood why there is no requirement of some type of flagging, fencing, etc around those holes. No telling how many have found their way down one,,,accidentally, or with some help as has been alleged.

to expensive, doesn't place a great danger to enough of the population. Most of them are unmarked and inaccessible.

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Some of these mines are from long, long ago before modern day tech and law enforcement. Many of the people involved are long dead, who you gonna fine or sue for not capping or marking?

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Some of these mines are from long, long ago before modern day tech and law enforcement. Many of the people involved are long dead, who you gonna fine or sue for not capping or marking?

 

Once he becomes a private citizen I plan on suing Obama for anything I have a problem with.

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Once he becomes a private citizen I plan on suing Obama for anything I have a problem with.

He will never be a private citizen again, he has now joined the elitist royalty.  :thumbsdn:  

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here's one we stumbled on

P2220216_zps505e6f7a.jpg

 

we stepped in and found a ladder shaft straight down with some broken up ventilation ducting going into the darkness

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Back home in Denver I had a highly modified Jeep Rubicon. We'd go 4x4'ing and find some really awesome old mine shafts, tunnels and vents. One of them took over 5 hrs of real tough and technical wheeling to get up to at about 11,350' elevation. I noticed it because I saw the tailings pile and rail track coming out of a snow wall. We went and checked it out and the openning was behind the snow wall. There was still the full track with cart in it and it was still functional. There were two old buildings half standing and a bunch of old everyday living items from the turn of the century. Awesome stuff.

I have pics somewhere.

Edited by jasongind
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Mining has created disasters for years and still are. They get all they can get, go bankrupt, and leave the mess for you and me to deal with. Want to see a huge example, visit Butte, Montana.

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Back home in Denver I had a highly modified Jeep Rubicon. We'd go 4x4'ing and find some really awesome old mine shafts, tunnels and vents. One of them took over 5 hrs of real tough and technical wheeling to get up to at about 11,350' elevation. I noticed it because I saw the tailings pile and rail track coming out of a snow wall. We went and checked it out and the openning was behind the snow wall. There was still the full track with cart in it and it was still functional. There were two old buildings half standing and a bunch of old everyday living items from the turn of the century. Awesome stuff.

I have pics somewhere.

Stuff seems to last longer at high elevation, except my stamina, that decreases significantly.
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Mine shafts are everywhere. Cougar Mt. Park, in King County Wa. is riddled with old coal mine shafts. The park has a significant hiking trail system but dare to go cross country (which is against park rules) and you'd better be on the lookout for old shafts that drop at 45 degrees into the black abyss. Coal Creek, China Creek, Newcastle, all names that are hold-overs of Cougar Mt. being a major regional coal producer back in the day.  Around here it is also not usual to find abandoned and rusty logging equipment up in the mountains.

Or B-17's, just can't ride your bike here...

http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WM2QXW_B_17_Tull_Canyon

Edited by KaToomTime

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