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Weird/creepy/funny things you've found/seen on the trail

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Stuff seems to last longer at high elevation, except my stamina, that decreases significantly.

The extremely dry conditions of Colorado help as well. A humid day is 20% and everyone starts complaining lol. Man I love it there

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They say Shaft is one bad mutha, shhh, but I'm talking about Shaft, John Shaft....📎shaft-movie-hotter-than-bond-cooler-than-bullitt-poster-print.jpg

Who is the man who would risk his life for another man...

Some of these mines are from long, long ago before modern day tech and law enforcement. Many of the people involved are long dead, who you gonna fine or sue for not capping or marking?

The state or feds depending on who owns the land. Then The area gets shut down.

Once he becomes a private citizen I plan on suing Obama for anything I have a problem with.

Civil suit the shot out of the sob
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There's an abandoned mine under my house. In fact, my neighborhood is named for the mine. The old entrance is still there, cold air billowing out even in the heat of summer. Even though I don't sense danger, it's still very creepy. Fortunately the old boney pile left behind makes for some fun dirt bike/trials riding.

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There's an abandoned mine under my house. In fact, my neighborhood is named for the mine. The old entrance is still there, cold air billowing out even in the heat of summer. Even though I don't sense danger, it's still very creepy. Fortunately the old boney pile left behind makes for some fun dirt bike/trials riding.

not to scare you but old mines have turned into sink holes
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The danger of collapse, and dangerous, toxic gases, especially H2S

 

Fair enough.

 

Cave ins, slick unstable walls, what ever trash is at the bottom, and since you can't clime out you need to walk out a tunnel or get roped out. Mines tend to be labyrinthitis with many levels dead ends toxic gas, hungry rats oh ya your probably hurt from falling, water, and after all that the entrance is most likely dinamighted closed so no one walks in

 

Lol, I meant rescuers, not riders. I have a pretty firm handle on why they're bad for riders.  :)

 

Some of these mines are from long, long ago before modern day tech and law enforcement. Many of the people involved are long dead, who you gonna fine or sue for not capping or marking?

 

In the state I live in (Western Australia) the owner of the mining lease is responsible for all safety and environmental liabilities whether they created them or not. So if you buy a lease you have also purchased the liabilities. When a company relinquishes a mining lease the liability then falls to the Department of Mines & Petroleum. I think it's pretty similar in a lot of other places. 

 

Here leaseholders usually ensure there is either a collar or a fence around a shaft. The closer to town it is the better the fence, some companies use a chain link cage, presumably because it's more about keeping curious kids out than providing a heads up. 

 

Another thing they do, which I hate, is fill the shafts in with dirt. I hate it because it makes them invisible, but still likely to collapse if the dirt is hung up in there. Rainwater drains through and washes the dirt into the drives leaving dirt suspended ready for an unsuspecting person to wander on to. It also destroys them for geological investigation. 

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The fill in with dirt would SUCK!!

Be my luck to be the one parked on it!!

They should fill them in with gold. That way we could just dig up the old mine and be rich.

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On the app, page 22, post 421: whew, stopping point. Marking this so I can return later and find my spot . Been reading at work for hours . It's an easy day and I work piece rate so once things are running good I have time to read one or two posts before I have to do work for a second . It's tiring lol but it's made the day go by. I've had to stop mid paragraph on some of the more long-winded posts . TALK ABOUT A CLIFF HANGER! This is my book mark, save it for another day and continue on.

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In the state I live in (Western Australia) the owner of the mining lease is responsible for all safety and environmental liabilities whether they created them or not. So if you buy a lease you have also purchased the liabilities. When a company relinquishes a mining lease the liability then falls to the Department of Mines & Petroleum. I think it's pretty similar in a lot of other places.

a large number of mines here date back over 100 years. Those are often the problems as the people who dug them are long dead and the hole is old enough to see the effects of environmental wear.

Many countries have learned from our experience. Also, at the time, many mines were dug in places no one wanted to go, no one was around to see them being dug, so no one cared. Now, thanks to population growth and recreation no one imagined when they were active, people today are literally running into abandoned mines by accident with tragic results. I like exploring abandoned places, caves, tunnels and mines are not trivial. Bring a buddy and a method to contact the outside world and make sure someone knows where you are and when to expect your return with the plan to contact rescue if you fail. You really should leave one or more on the surface entrance.

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a large number of mines here date back over 100 years. Those are often the problems as the people who dug them are long dead and the hole is old enough to see the effects of environmental wear.

Many countries have learned from our experience. Also, at the time, many mines were dug in places no one wanted to go, no one was around to see them being dug, so no one cared. Now, thanks to population growth and recreation no one imagined when they were active, people today are literally running into abandoned mines by accident with tragic results. I like exploring abandoned places, caves, tunnels and mines are not trivial. Bring a buddy and a method to contact the outside world and make sure someone knows where you are and when to expect your return with the plan to contact rescue if you fail. You really should leave one or more on the surface entrance.

 

Our dirt bikes are pretty overt markings... =)

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Our dirt bikes are pretty overt markings... =)

Won't do much good when you don't come home after dark if no one has any idea where to look for your overt markings. Even so, after decades of CO2 or methane build up, it may still be a recovery and not a rescue. Hence leaving someone at the mouth of the cave who might, just might be able to throw you a rope to get you out.

There was  case in the area I grew up about a decade ago, three or four people tried to rescue a kid who fell into a manure pit, each would-be rescuer quickly lost consciousness and another went in after the last. Sadly, all of them died. Methane displaced the oxygen. Unlike holding your breath, many gasses do not give that "out of breath" feeling. You get the pains in your chest from CO2 buildup. But if you continue to breathe, you expel the CO2, so one doesn't realize he's asphyxiating until the brain "shuts off". Then it's far too late.

Caves and tunnels are cool, but they're really dangerous, low light, poison gas, collapse and unexpected holes are very real possibilities.

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Won't do much good when you don't come home after dark if no one has any idea where to look for your overt markings. Even so, after decades of CO2 or methane build up, it may still be a recovery and not a rescue. Hence leaving someone at the mouth of the cave who might, just might be able to throw you a rope to get you out.

There was  case in the area I grew up about a decade ago, three or four people tried to rescue a kid who fell into a manure pit, each would-be rescuer quickly lost consciousness and another went in after the last. Sadly, all of them died. Methane displaced the oxygen. Unlike holding your breath, many gasses do not give that "out of breath" feeling. You get the pains in your chest from CO2 buildup. But if you continue to breathe, you expel the CO2, so one doesn't realize he's asphyxiating until the brain "shuts off". Then it's far too late.

Caves and tunnels are cool, but they're really dangerous, low light, poison gas, collapse and unexpected holes are very real possibilities.

 

 Agreed, we are well aware, I was referring to being able to find the entrance of where we went in for recovery. Only issues we have ever had was risk of collapse. None of the mines we have explored had any air quality issues luckily...lol

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Mining has created disasters for years and still are. They get all they can get, go bankrupt, and leave the mess for you and me to deal with. Want to see a huge example, visit Butte, Montana.

 

Not saying that some mining legacies don't get cleaned up with taxpayer funds, but Butte isn't a good example.  Anaconda Copper Company was original owner/miner at Butte.  Anaconda was purchased by Atlantic Richfield (ARCO).  ARCO was merged into British Petroleum (BP).  BP is now the responsible party for the clean-up and it's a huge one.  In our system the last owner of record is responsible for the clean-up, unless that entity is no longer in existence.  Last time I checked BP was very much alive.

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Georet, just noticed you are from Oklahoma. I came down from Wichita to OKC to ride at Cross Timbers yesterday. A great place to ride.

I hope BP ever gets around to the clean up. The people we talked to when visiting there 2 years ago weren't holding their breath while they waited. That will be a gigantic clean up effort. And in addition to the pit mine is the HUGE honey comb of mine shafts under the town that are filling with toxic water. Not sure that could ever be cleaned up, and what is the danger of sink holes through the Years? Don't think I would buy any real estate there.

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Agreed, we are well aware, I was referring to being able to find the entrance of where we went in for recovery. Only issues we have ever had was risk of collapse. None of the mines we have explored had any air quality issues luckily...lol

now the Paris catacombs, I'd like to spend a day in there. Just one though. There's about 6 million who never left.

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So, last week I happened onto the scene of an accident while riding.  A dirtbiker got hit by a Jeep.  The cops and ambulance were there, and we had to stop because the trail was blocked.  Anyhow, we waited for a few minutes and they loaded the guy up and ambulance left.  They put the bike in the back of the Jeep and then everyone else left.

 

We put our gear back on and went to resume our ride, and I noticed a small Igloo cooler with a red-cross emblem on the side of the trail.  I looked inside and there was some ice packs and a big wad of gauze which was folded-over.  I unfolded it, and there was the guy's big toe!  I guess it got severed in the wreck and they were going to sew it back on.  Unfortunately, they left it there on the side of the trail.

 

Talk about being freaked-out!  There I was, deep in the woods miles from nowhere with no cell service, holding some guy's big toe.  I was sort of panicked and I had no freaking idea what I should do!

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So, last week I happened onto the scene of an accident while riding. A dirtbiker got hit by a Jeep. The cops and ambulance were there, and we had to stop because the trail was blocked. Anyhow, we waited for a few minutes and they loaded the guy up and ambulance left. They put the bike in the back of the Jeep and then everyone else left.

We put our gear back on and went to resume our ride, and I noticed a small Igloo cooler with a red-cross emblem on the side of the trail. I looked inside and there was some ice packs and a big wad of gauze which was folded-over. I unfolded it, and there was the guy's big toe! I guess it got severed in the wreck and they were going to sew it back on. Unfortunately, they left it there on the side of the trail.

Talk about being freaked-out! There I was, deep in the woods miles from nowhere with no cell service, holding some guy's big toe. I was sort of panicked and I had no freaking idea what I should do!

Cliff hanger.
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