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'03 225 hard to start cold

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I bought an '03 TTR 225 for the wife. When it sits for 2 or more days it had told get it fired up. It keeps flooding on me and killing the battery. Any one have any thoughts on this? When does start runs great. Bike is bone stock.

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These are a little finicky. The first thing you should do on your new bike is clean the carb. I'll warn you, this is not the most newbie-friendly carb to clean, so if you've never done it before, take it to your local bike shop. But you can remove the carb yourself and save a couple bucks, not to mention the hassle of loading and unloading the bike.

There are some stupid-ass safety screws that hold the carb slide guide. These are lock-tighted in place. If you do this yourself, you'll either need to cut the heads off and use a soldering iron to loosen the lock-tite or take your chances with the plastic guide in place.

If you have a shop clean the carb, ask them to replace these with "normal" fasteners, phillips or torx, it doesn't matter as long as it's not safety fasteners. And no lock-tite!

This will save you hassle in the future. There's no reason that I can see for this.

Also ask them to leave the mixture screw plug off, they probably wouldn't put it back, but just ask to be sure.

Next, you'll need to drain the carb when ever you let the bike sit for any period of time, or ride it every day. They're just really picky about "cold gas", it's not bad, it's not old, it's just "cold" and like you, nobody likes cold food.

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I have an 03 and they are jetted LEAN. Turn the air screw out almost 3 whole turns, and make sure it is clean. Mine fires right up with choke out every time. However, I NEVER leave fuel in my carb even for 24 hours. I either drain the float bowl, or turn the petcock to off, and run the fuel out of it, or both.

Go here for help---http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=407557

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Next, you'll need to drain the carb when ever you let the bike sit for any period of time, or ride it every day. They're just really picky about "cold gas", it's not bad, it's not old, it's just "cold" and like you, nobody likes cold food.

Sorry Bro, but I am calling BS on the above statement. You have provided some pretty good information, and advice, but not about the fuel being warm. The fuel is old and has a shelf life of about 3 weeks untreated.

Warm fuel does atomize better in a carb, true, but that is the whole reason why they have Chokes or fuel enrichners. The motor should run cold or hot, with or without choke.

Truth is today's fuel just sucks, and the ethanol in it destroys rubber parts. The E85 stuff just won't work in our single cylinder engines it has NO power.

Yes your bike will run on regular gas station pump gas with E10, but if you go to a marina/ racetrack, etc. and buy fuel with out ethanol you doing yourself, and your bikes performance a huge service.

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You demonstrate exactly what I'm talking about on the TT-R225/XT225 right here:

However, I NEVER leave fuel in my carb even for 24 hours. I either drain the float bowl, or turn the petcock to off, and run the fuel out of it, or both.

My XT550 doesn't care. When I bought it, it started easily (if you can call it that since the compression release wasn't working right) on cola colored gasoline that was four years old!

Our PW80 runs on piss and vinegar. I never have had a problem with gas in that thing, new or old.

The DR/DR-Z eh, sort of. I left gas in it over the winter when we parked it, then it sat all summer, went to sell it in early fall. It would start, but when you gave it gas, it would die. Drained gas and replaced, no problems.

Our lawn tractor then got that gas with no issues.

However! The Yamaha 225 is really picky about gas, if it sits in the carb bowl for a week, it won't start. This is well documented and if you really want to call me out, I'll find a dozen other posts anecdotally confirming it.

For the record, I usually let all my bikes run with the petcock off to remove as much gas as possible when I park them simply because I never know how long they're going to sit. Carb cleaning is not on the top of my to-do list, especially on the Yamahas we own since the carbs are a pain to remove. Exception: PW80, carb can be removed, cleaned and returned to use in 20 minutes, most of which is soaking in carb cleaner. I spend a good 20 minutes simply removing the XT carb since the design is not service friendly.

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You demonstrate exactly what I'm talking about on the TT-R225/XT225 right here:

However! The Yamaha 225 is really picky about gas, if it sits in the carb bowl for a week, it won't start. This is well documented and if you really want to call me out, I'll find a dozen other posts anecdotally confirming it.

.

Not trying to be confrontational. Just informative and correct.

Maybe that is why I never have problems, because I don't have ANY starting issues on my TTR. Also, I followed the link above, and have had to adjust my Air fuel screw to 3-31/2 turns out,-- with stock jets. I have owned my bike in this form for almost 5 years. I have a whole other carb rejetted that I plan to use soon with an aftermarket exhaust.

However read this site. It might help you understand why you should not be doing what you are doing. Especially with regular pump gas.

http://e0pc.com/

Just trying to help you to not have to tear into ANY of your carbs and save you time, money, and hassle. your choice

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I've read tons of information, for and against ethanol. I am of the opinion that e10 is absolutely harmless so long as you don't do things which cause problems with even straight gasoline (hasn't been available half a century or so, it's been laced with additives for a long, long time.)

If you leave petroleum based fuel laying around exposed to open air you'll have problems. Ethanol, leaded, AVgas. Even kerosene and diesel, but these take a lot longer since they're used in applications very tolerant to contamination and the fuel itself has much more energy than gas does.

All underground tanks have water in them if they've been in use for any significant period of time. The last gas station I worked at the tanks had three inches of water in them. This is one of many reasons why most municipalities demand underground tank owners dig them up every couple of decades.

E10, E15, E20, E85 and E95 (diesel alternative) benefits all US consumers and benefits US farmers too. Unlike "straight" gas, which primarily benefits foreign nationals.

E10 isn't causing this problem. I think it's a combination of carb design, ignition power and engine layout that makes these bikes finicky.

BTW, I realized when I was driving to work this morning that you may have taken me literally when I said "'cold' gas". Temperature has nothing to do with this. I meant "cold" as a way to describe gas that is not ultimately desirable such as cold food is to humans.

Well, here goes ethanol debate number one million, two hundred fifty thousand, six hundred and three for TT.

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You are both making some correct points.

The reason the bike in question doesn't start great is because the stock pilot jet is one size too lean. It will run ok once warmed up, but a richer pilot jet would make it even easier. If you're adjusting your fuel screw to 3.5, it needs a richer pilot at 2.0. The pilot in that bike is their to keep the EPA happy, not to promote driveability.

Colder temperature gas doesn't atomize and light off quite as quick, but once a motor is running, it makes more power on cooler fuel. Drag racers put ice on their fuel source before a run.

Ethanol doesn't matter in the slightest on a 15 hp four stroke.

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We're running a 40/140 (up on both pilot and main) and adjusting the fuel screw. Bike still does the squirrelly won't start unless float bowl is drained if it sits for a week.

The thing is just picky.

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