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'08 YZ250F to WR250F Suspension help?

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I bought a 2008 YZ250F that I'm setting up for hare scrambles. I've revalved shocks and forks before, so I have a pretty good idea of how it all works.

I have a couple of questions:

Is the YZ and WR suspension identical except for the valving?

Can anyone tell me what the stock shim stacks are for a '08 WR250F? I figure this would be a good place to start. This information might save me a couple of times of tearing it all apart.

Thanks.

- Brad

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I can tell you about my 04 WR, it has as steel rear spring that is heavy compared to the YZ titanium spring that is light weight. When I had my 03 YZ bike revalved like that, we freed up the mid travel shims, blue printed the valves in the forks, ran slightly lower oil level for softer front end. Rear almost same treatment for shims. Its still stiffer than a WR, but a lot softer and compliant than stock YZ. I'm old and like it soft. I also added a Guts Racing tall soft seat foam and that helped a bunch.

My 04 WR we revalved too, but it didn't respond as well and still is stiff in the mid stroke. Remember that preload on the rear has an affect on how soft the rear is. Good luck.

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I bought a 2008 YZ250F that I'm setting up for hare scrambles. I've revalved shocks and forks before, so I have a pretty good idea of how it all works.

I have a couple of questions:

Is the YZ and WR suspension identical except for the valving?

Can anyone tell me what the stock shim stacks are for a '08 WR250F? I figure this would be a good place to start. This information might save me a couple of times of tearing it all apart.

Thanks.

- Brad

Just completely not the same

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One difference I know about is that the forks on the YZ are of the newer twin-chamber type, and the WR uses what guys call open bath cartridge forks similar to how forks were from around 1989.

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The YZ forks are totally different than the WR, and the valveing does not work the same way. Try the suspension forum you might get better details

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My advise to you is send it off to get it done right. You might save a few bucks doing it yourself but is it really worth it in the end?

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Because for me, half of the hobby is learning how things work and doing the work myself. I'm not expecting to be series champion. I enjoy the challenge of making the bike a little better after each race, not by throwing money at it, but by figuring out what needs to be done.

- Brad

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The Wr forks are very soft even for light non aggressive riders, contact davej at smartperformance and get the phase 4 kit for those forks, its simply the best kit to transform the forks, and you can change the shim stack around to suit your needs,

Also change springs for your weight

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He's actually got a YZ, and he's wondering if valving specs. for the WR would work in the YZ for trail use.

I think the Phase 4 kit is specifically for the WR and not a YZ with a dual-chamber fork, although I wouldn't doubt that Dave at Smart Performance Inc. has something to make a YZ better for off-road use.

Since I'm mentioning WRs and the Phase 4 kit:

I've got a 2009 WR-250F and have the Phase 4 kit installed in my forks.

Definitely a step up in how it works, mainly absorbing the sharp little hits better while not feeling soft and mushy.

Well worth it.

To me (150 lbs.), the stock fork wasn't too soft, but it did give me the feeling that the Yamaha factory saved money by not specifying a better setup, and I wanted better sharp bump absorbtion.

The Phase 4 kit delivered. :smirk:

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