No more "I'm too old" talk

The next time you hear someone bitch about being too old,

point them at Chuck " Feets " Minert ..........

He'll be 80 in a couple months.....this was him Saturday at the REM MX race (#45)

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How many 80 year olds have expressions like that? (I didn't say smile, lol)

He says he doesn't quit racing MX because

he's afraid if he does, he'll have a heart attack.

Even though it's funny, actually think there's some wisdom to that

Go ride.

That is SO awesome! I hope I can do the same.

And he was beating up on the 65+ guys on the way to his win.

Dam, I hope I can at least stand on my own at 80.:cheers:

Pitbull, yeah that was awesome.

By the way, Jody was at the two stroke championship this

weekend riding/wrenching on the MXA bikes, kudos to him too.

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That's very, very cool. More power too him! I know 80 year olds that get to the point of refusing to turn left without a signal. I hope I never get like that. Attitude makes a huge difference.

Great thread, and such a very cool article link pit bull, thanks.In the bmx world there is a guy they call Elvis, who races with a real robot heart, and writes the monthly columns. He reminds me of Jody in his perspective, and wit, that only riders will fully understand.

Now, a geezer question, as we age do we go down in displacement and risk wringing it, or up in displacement and lug it?

Kudos to the older riders :cheers: I occasionally ride with a 72 year old and he routinely kicks our butts on the trails, thankfully he runs a distinctive smelling fuel so we at least know which way he went at the trail forks.

I'm no spring chicken myself and have had countless arguments with my wife about being "to old to ride" I just tell her "I'm not too old to ride, I'm too old to fall down" BIG difference there :bonk: But, falling down is all part of riding :p

You're only as old as you think you are, and I think I'm 19 (just wish certain other parts of my body were still 19)

Ride on old farts :ride:

Now, a geezer question, as we age do we go down in displacement and risk wringing it, or up in displacement and lug it?

Imho, neither. Bike power/response/characteristics relate to one's technique/terrain and

to one's preferrences and riding style. A lighter bike will usually be easier though, unless you're doing desert where some mass can help.

That said, poor throttle control on a 450 can wear older guys out so they tend to prefer 250F's for

the combo of light weight and easy power. But it's not absolutely necessary and is more related to technique/terrain/skill.

The most important thing is fitness/nutrition to combat the approx. 1% muscle mass loss every year after 40.

When I read people saying slow down and take it easy as you age, just have to facepalm.

There was a study with ex-pro athletes comparing those who trained after their careers v. similar guys who didn't.

The drop off in ability for the non-trainers was startling, compared to how well the aged who trained maintained their abilities.

The trainers generally could perform at a relatively high level until they became ill from disease/heredity and passed.

It was eye opening and a reminder that if you slow down, you're guaranteeing you'll then get slower again repeatedly after that.

Those guys are very inspirational. I will never complain that i'm old for MX again...:cheers:

You don't use it,you lose it..although I don't think you roll as good as when you're 20:smirk:

although I don't think you roll as good as when you're 20:smirk:

That can be taken a lot of ways :cheers:

:ride:

You dont stop riding because you get old, you get old because you stop riding.

I'm still dodging trees, and playing in the twisties too. Just ride more "relaxed fit" bikes now days.:cheers:

A body in motion tends to stay in motion. A body at rest tends to stay at rest.

I'm getting too old..... :cheers::ride:

Imho, neither. Bike power/response/characteristics relate to one's technique/terrain and

to one's preferrences and riding style. A lighter bike will usually be easier though, unless you're doing desert where some mass can help.

That said, poor throttle control on a 450 can wear older guys out so they tend to prefer 250F's for

the combo of light weight and easy power. But it's not absolutely necessary and is more related to technique/terrain/skill.

The most important thing is fitness/nutrition to combat the approx. 1% muscle mass loss every year after 40.

When I read people saying slow down and take it easy as you age, just have to facepalm.

There was a study with ex-pro athletes comparing those who trained after their careers v. similar guys who didn't.

The drop off in ability for the non-trainers was startling, compared to how well the aged who trained maintained their abilities.

The trainers generally could perform at a relatively high level until they became ill from disease/heredity and passed.

It was eye opening and a reminder that if you slow down, you're guaranteeing you'll then get slower again repeatedly after that.

This is a really informative piece of info Carver:thumbsup:

So now that raises my next question; Is it possible to get it back, once you've lost it? I put myself into that "non-trainer" category. Can I gain back what I have lost?

Do you know of studies on this?

Thanks. Most people can get back to their potential, it just takes longer

to get improvements, you have to train at a slower pace and the training

is accompanied by more soreness and time to recover. That's where nutrition

makes the big difference. Recovery management is key as you age because

you can go too hard actually slowing your gains in addition to the reduced pace of age.

Lots of stuff online (by pro's) about training for those over 40. Most of your limitations

at that stage are mindset, recovery, nutrition and heredity. 75% of those, you control.

Wow that is awesome......I hope I am doing that at his age too......

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