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Clutch plates: multiple thicknesses?

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http://www.powersportsplus.com/parts/search/Kawasaki/Motorcycle/2011/KX450EBF+KX450F/CLUTCH/parts.html

Microfiche shows (3) different metal clutch plate options:

13089 - 2.0MM

13089A - 1.2MM

13089B - 1.6MM

Does anyone know which is stock/standard, and why there are optional sizes?

Also, the aftermarket Friction plate kits don't show the 'outer' plates as being different (more fiber surface), as in the stock clutch. I am assuming that all the friction plates are just more heavy duty in the kits, more like the stock outer friction plates?

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I don't know for sure, but an educated guess would be to get an optimal stack height by using different size steels. By using thinner steels you may also be able to increase the number of frictions in the stack creating more holding power. We build HP clutch packs for racing auto transmissions this way.

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The different thickness is for getting the correct stack height or overall thickness. The service manual states they want a specific angle on the clutch arm. There are only a few ways to do this and two of them are to change stack height or change the shim on the push rod. If everything works fine now, take it apart and measure the plates and do the math to come up with as close as possible to the current stack height. The problem you run into is the fiber plates are not always consistent in thickness, thus the reason for different steels or a different spacer on push rod.

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The different thickness is for getting the correct stack height or overall thickness. The service manual states they want a specific angle on the clutch arm. There are only a few ways to do this and two of them are to change stack height or change the shim on the push rod. If everything works fine now, take it apart and measure the plates and do the math to come up with as close as possible to the current stack height. The problem you run into is the fiber plates are not always consistent in thickness, thus the reason for different steels or a different spacer on push rod.

Thank you.

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