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Davej´s guide for setting clickers

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hey guys there was some advice how dave would tune in the supension

i had it on my computer but it got stolen ....so i´m searching but i can´t find it...

I know it was something with turning all the clickers out and start with adjusting the rebound first than the comp.

but what i don´t know if you set the race sag with all the clickers out ...

than i think you start with the forks rebound in going circles in the flat and if the bikes pushing or knife in you adjust the rebound according....

if the bike pushes wide i think the suspension is coming out too fast ....

but i´m not sure if i remember this right ....

anybody got this post?

or maybe dave can post this again ...under sticky....

buy the way DAVE i wrote you twice already -- no answer :-(

would need some stuff....

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Setting sag isn't affected by clickers. The dampening section of your suspension is in use while the suspension is in motion, either compressing or rebounding. Sitting still (statically) on the bike equalizes all dampening, so it doesn't matter. All of your weight is supported by the spring.

I've been told that the pre-load distance in your shock spring should be between 5mm-10mm from its original length. If you are under 5mm, get a softer spring, over 10mm and you need a stiffer spring.

As for the clickers, it makes sense to open them and turn them in, starting with rebound, but I haven't seen Davej's post about it.

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use the mx tech one?

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hey guys there was some advice how dave would tune in the supension

i had it on my computer but it got stolen ....so i´m searching but i can´t find it...

I know it was something with turning all the clickers out and start with adjusting the rebound first than the comp.

but what i don´t know if you set the race sag with all the clickers out ...

than i think you start with the forks rebound in going circles in the flat and if the bikes pushing or knife in you adjust the rebound according....

if the bike pushes wide i think the suspension is coming out too fast ....

but i´m not sure if i remember this right ....

anybody got this post?

or maybe dave can post this again ...under sticky....

buy the way DAVE i wrote you twice already -- no answer :-(

would need some stuff....

Is this what you're looking for?

For forks and shocks, the rebound screw by-passes both a rebound and compression stack. This means that turning the rebound screw will affect both compression and rebound rates. For this reason, you should tune an ideal rebound setting first, then fine tune the compression setting with the compression adjustor. Be aware that any changes to the rebound setting may require a follow-up adjustment to the compression setting.

Sometimes adding more compression damping makes a ride feel smoother and more plush, and sometimes removing compression damping makes a ride feel harsh. You’ll notice that as you add more compression damping, the fork or shock may tend to ride high and then become too stiff. At this setting, back off the adjustment until the fork becomes too harsh or lose. Your range of adjustment becomes the values between the high and low of these two boundaries. This means the fork or shock is neither under or over-stroking (under or over oscillating).

An ideal rebound setting is one that allows the fork or shock to fully recover before an additional strike comes into the bike. If the bike sits or squats over a series of bumps, you have too much rebound. If your body tends to fall into the bike, which can feel like the front end is harsh, this too can be from too much rebound. Do not use the rebound setting to fully control a bike that “pogos” or jumps back after a flat landing.

It may be necessary to come out on the high-speed shock setting more than usual when using SPI-3 in the shock. A setting of 2.25 to 2.5 on KYBs is common and a setting of 3 to 3.5 is common on Showas. For light weight riders or for a more woods centric ride, a softer high speed spring may be required for optimal results. Contact us for details.

For most open and multi-chamber forks, it’s not uncommon to conclude with settings that have the rebound screw further out than usual and a compression setting with the screw set in more than usual. You may find that the combination of 11 to 14 out on rebound with a compression setting of 4 to 8 may yield the best results. However, tune and test at will, and feel to contact us at any time for additional details or for problem solving.

We have found that when using the 215.VM2.K5 in the shock, that a slightly lower than normal nitrogen setting may be beneficial. If you find that the bike is too harsh or chatters after setting the low and high-speed compression setting, lower the nitrogen reading by 5 to 10PSI and test. Keep in mind that when you remove nitrogen, you will have more rebound damping. Adjust accordingly.

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