chain slack

While enjoying the open ride at Red Bud saturday afternoon I noticed very little chain slack on most of the bikes. I have always left a little slack in my chains under my full weight and never had a chain come off. Am I missing something important or just old school?..Dave

Thats crazy....most all bike need atleast a few inches on play in the chain....having the chain to tight is hard on the countershaft and makes it easier for the chain to break...Like I said...not sure whats going on there.....:thumbsup:

best way i found to adjust your chain to the perfect tention, is get a rachet strap. attach one side to your swing arm, attach the other side of the strap also to your swing arm. with your bike on a stand, rachet strap the suspention till your swing arm is at 90* on your bike. now tighten the chain to an almost fully snug fit. leave just a little bit of play.

if im at the track and need to do it quickly. ill adjust the chain to where i think it should be, lay over my set with my MASSIVE abbs, grab a hold of the swing arm and pull till its almost 90*(this is acomplished by having MASSIVE arm musles like i have) then check chain tention.

if im at the track and need to do it quickly. ill adjust the chain to where i think it should be, lay over my set with my MASSIVE abbs, grab a hold of the swing arm and pull till its almost 90*(this is acomplished by having MASSIVE arm musles like i have) then check chain tention.

Is this you? I think I have seen you on here before

http://blog.jarofjuice.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/06/post-muscle-guy.jpg

Chain slack varies from bike model to model. If you don't have an owner's manual for the spec, you need to remove the shock to allow you to put the countershaft, swingarm bolt and rear axle in alignment. That's when the chain is at it's tightest and at that point you need about 1/2" of slack. You can also compress the rear suspension with a tie down if you are in a hurry.

BTW, if you don't have an owner's manual for your bike, you should get one.

Chain slack varies from bike model to model. If you don't have an owner's manual for the spec, you need to remove the shock to allow you to put the countershaft, swingarm bolt and rear axle in alignment. That's when the chain is at it's tightest and at that point you need about 1/2" of slack. You can also compress the rear suspension with a tie down if you are in a hurry.

BTW, if you don't have an owner's manual for your bike, you should get one.

That's what I do, there really is no other way to know if your chain is too tight.

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