Honda HP4S

Does anyone have experience with this oil. Im sure its great for the engine but how about the trans side?

never run synthetic in the trans side. itll fry the frictions in your clutch. best oils to run in hondas are HP4M w/ moly in the motor and the honda HP Trans oil 80/85W in the tranny. i run these in my rider's(pro) bikes and they seem to hold up the best.

I run the HP4S in both the engine and trans. I use my clutch aLOT (tight woods). No complaints. I'm a firm believer in fully synthetic lubricants.

I run Rotella synthetic in the clutch side without any issue. I also have a Rekluse auto and with this set-up better oil flow.

Ran it this weekend and clutch worked flawlessly. I feel much better having the best stuff money can buy in there. Bet it helps extend valve service intervals.

Wet clutch friction test on Rotella T with Triple Protection 15W-40, Rotella T Synthetic 5W-40 (CI-4) and Rotella T6 Synthetic 5W-40 (CJ-4) have all pass JASO MA.

Shell is now JASO certification.

All motorcycle wet clutch transmission should not be more then 40w or Automatic Transmission Fluid Dexron III or Type F depend on how old your bike is do not ever use Automotive Gear oil 75W or higher

Wet clutch friction test on Rotella T with Triple Protection 15W-40, Rotella T Synthetic 5W-40 (CI-4) and Rotella T6 Synthetic 5W-40 (CJ-4) have all pass JASO MA.

Shell is now JASO certification.

All motorcycle wet clutch transmission should not be more then 40w or Automatic Transmission Fluid Dexron III or Type F depend on how old your bike is do not ever use Automotive Gear oil 75W or higher

Would the bike start with 75# oil???

Would the bike start with 75# oil???

You do mean 75w rigth?

Sure the bike will start but it not going last long with that thick oil you just burn up the wet clutchs

I was joking, how thick 75wt is would you get the motor to spin enough to start!

Gear oil and motor oil are rated on different viscosity scales.

A 75 weight gear oil is about the same actual viscosity as 40 weight motor oil.

Honda markets an 80-80W gear oil specifically for their motorcycle gearboxes/clutches.

EDIT: correct gear oil weight.

Edited by G31m
Gear oil and motor oil are rated on different viscosity scales.

A 75 weight gear oil is about the same actual viscosity as 40 weight motor oil.

Honda markets a 75W gear oil specifically for their motorcycle gearboxes/clutches.

Yup that why Honda and so called 75W gear oil is a joke it more like 40 weight motor and that why I perf Lucas Gear Oil but next I change my gear oil in my diff & trans oil in the Polaris Sportsman 500 & King Quad 750AXi I think I switch it over to new Lucas Synthetic Gear Oil I would just go with Royalpurple but it cost to dran much.

All my Bike, ATV's, Lawmer, Car and Truck all used Rotella Synthetic 5W-40 and have been for over 6 year now.

Yup that why Honda and so called 75W gear oil is a joke it more like 40 weight motor and that why I perf Lucas Gear Oil .

What do you think the viscosity of Lucas' gear oil is?

What do you think the viscosity of Lucas' gear oil is?

75w just like it should be thick and dosen't pour out very eazy so if the oil pour out more like reg motor then has no ture viscosity for gear box in case of manual gearboxes transmissions (dry clutch setup), transfer cases, transaxles, front differential, rear differential.

The one that some people really need beware of is the newer manual gearboxes transmissions and transfer cases req ATF like Fluid there reason for that.

Then there the wet brake system build in to rear differential on Suzuki, Kawasaki, Honda and Tractors in that case you have to used tractor hydraulic/transmission fluid like Mobil Fluid 424 oil or AMSOIL Synthetic Tractor Hydraulic/Transmission Oil from your local Tractor Supply or any Tractor Dealer or carrys a universal tractor hydraulic/transmission oil.

And if wonder can Hydraulic/Transmission oil be used in motorcycle wet clutch setup no the friction material much diff then clutch/wet brake friction material and that oil will eat up standard paper, cork, kevlar motorcycle clutch.

Gear oil and motor oil are rated on different viscosity scales.

A 75 weight gear oil is about the same actual viscosity as 40 weight motor oil.

Honda markets an 80-80W gear oil specifically for their motorcycle gearboxes/clutches.

EDIT: correct gear oil weight.

Belray gearsaver is one of the most popular transmission fluids sold for four strokes at 75wt. Honda's 80 wt. is very popular.

We ran Honda 10w-40 synthetic. Synthetics are great and recommended for those bikes. Its the moly additive that can't be run in a wet clutch. Make sure you run the synthetic without the moly additive.

75w just like it should be thick and dosen't pour out very eazy so if the oil pour out more like reg motor then has no ture viscosity for gear box.

You are confused. 75 weight gear oil has a viscosity very, very close to 40 motor oil. It is not thick.

The one that some people really need beware of is the newer manual gearboxes transmissions and transfer cases req ATF like Fluid there reason for that..
If it's required, then the owner's manual will specify ATF. I know of no Kawasaki or Honda machine that specifies ATF.

Then there the wet brake system build in to rear differential on Suzuki, Kawasaki, Honda and Tractors

No Honda has a wet brake. Just clearing things up.

You can't always rely on what you read on the internet. Read your manual if you want the best advice. :thumbsup:

When you say the 75w is thick and poors slowly like it should, what you are actually seeing is a straight weight oil very similar to 40w. The 10 -40 flows easier due to its multi viscosity. The people that said 75w is similar to 40w are correct. If you can run the 10-40 or 10-30. The thicker oils will have a hard time lubricating this clutch due to the limited flow caused by certain design restrictions.

You are confused. 75 weight gear oil has a viscosity very, very close to 40 motor oil. It is not thick.

What ever if that what belive then go head and stick it in your car or truck rear differential and see how long it last with 40w motor oil.

If it's required, then the owner's manual will specify ATF. I know of no Kawasaki or Honda machine that specifies ATF.

I didn't say Motorcycle

No Honda has a wet brake. Just clearing things up.

They did but it not one you can buy it was a protype they end up going with back to sealed mechanical drum on rear.

I didn't say Motorcycle

Since no one was talking about anything but motorcycles and ATVs, I had no way of knowing you were referring to trucks, tractors, or skip loaders. I had just assumed the subject was still motorcycles and ATV's. I apologize.

wow, somebody is way out in la la land. Car or truck differentials are just a tad bit different than a motorycle trans, and bring up something other than a motorcycle on a motorcycle forum in a motorcycle oil thread, and of course lets talk about a one off prototype that nobody has any knowledge of or gives a rats arse?! Sounds like someone is so off base and just trying to cover for there lack of knowledge and cant just say they were wrong. By the way what kind of oil should I use in my honda truck prototype differentials wet brake? I am now dumber for having read these replies. Instead of replying, spend some time reading threads and learning about viscosities and the ratings the society of automotive engineers (SAE) have put on these lubricants.

The Honda CRF 250X owners manual recommends Honda synthetic motor oil, Honda Regular MC motor oil and Honda gear lube 80/85W for the transmission (I own one) . ReKluse RECOMMENDS Rotella Synthetic for their clutches. I've run Mobile 1 (auto not MC) 10/40 , 15/50; Rotella T Syn and Regular 10/40, 5/40, or 15/40 in Suzuki shafties (650/850) Suz Bandit 1200 and ST1100 since 1983 (all with integrated gearbox) and the CRF 250X gearbox (which came with a quart of regular Honda 10/40). Over 40,000 miles on all three Suz and 30,000 on the ST. Never slipped a clutch or wore one out; zero shifting problems. A 1200 Bandit is a torque monster and it didn't slip. For the last 2-300 miles I have run Mobile 1 75/90W gear oil in the 250X tranny. That's with no oil change why? Because the Honda CRF 250X manual calls for oil changes every 15 HOURS. We average about 15 mph and ride for 2-3 hours, avoiding mud and water (we all own trophies from our youth and are all over 60 who do we need to impress?). Would I change the oil more often If I could still ride one of Ohio's mud bog enduros or dual sports - sure. I think the gasoline that you're using makes a lot more sense to worry about than splitting hydrocarbon strands over which oil to use.

The one issue I don't find mentioned: Is the Honda 80/85W oil GL5 or GL4? That makes a difference because of the effect on any bronze or copper bushings that might be in the tranny (maybe there are none). But some GL5 is rated for GL4 because it includes inhibitors that keep the GL5 Extreme Pressure additives from corroding these materials. So GL 4 or 5 for the Honda Gear oil? I know IT works but if it is GL4 I may not run GL 5 synthetics.

But I may shift over to a mix of ambergris and lamb placenta oil for my tranny. One blog from Bonners Ferry, ID said that it was excellent and you can drink it, deep fry with it or run it in your diesel engine.

Thanks

Oh yeah. What Speedysdad said about the moly additive (Honda or others)

:smirk:

Edited by woxofoh

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