Anyone think the KDX will ever come back?

Obviously no one knows but anyone have any assumptions?

I read somewhere that the KDX was still continued in Europe for a while after it was discontinued in America but I'm not entirely sure weather that was true or not.

I would love to see the series come back but what are your thoughts?

Probably not. honda/kawi/suzuki/yamaha are primarily (solely) focused on 4 stroke tech. That's all they want to sell. If they ever see the light and begin making 2 strokes again, there may be something LIKE the kdx, but I doubt the kdx would be back in anything like it's current form.

Right I know really KTM is the only one still focused on producing 2 strokes. Other than that I would just like to see another Kawasaki trail bike.

Even if they did there's no guarantee the KDX would be available in the US. Honda XR's are still being made, but not available in the US since 2004.

Well, KTM, Gas Gas and Husqvarna are still making the two strokes. You could tell that they were getting ready to phase out the KDX early on, since it really didn't have any changes or upgrades since the mid 90s. I would love to see a fresh model with inverted forks, etc. But all this emissions stuff and pressure to build cleaner running bikes has got the Japanese manufacturers on the ropes. Maybe fuel injection will change all that and two strokes will make a nice clean comeback.:thumbsup:

Maybe fuel injection will change all that and two strokes will make a nice clean comeback.:thumbsup:

And that is exactly what we have to hope for haha.

But all this emissions stuff and pressure to build cleaner running bikes has got the Japanese manufacturers on the ropes

Emissions has absolutely NOTHING to do with hit. How much cleaner do you think a 4t really is? Very very little, and on closed course the EPA nor any other agency has any say in it anyway. Ossa engineers said their direct injected 2 stroke was so clean and efficient that it would probably run off the exhaust from the 4t, LOL! Making a clean 2 stroke is not the problem, just look at outboard 2 strokes, snowmobiles, 2 stroke deisel freighter engines, etc. The issue here is that the big companies do not make the same sort of profit from a 2 stroke design. So they market and sell 4 strokes. Very simple.

Emissions has absolutely NOTHING to do with hit. How much cleaner do you think a 4t really is? Very very little, and on closed course the EPA nor any other agency has any say in it anyway. Ossa engineers said their direct injected 2 stroke was so clean and efficient that it would probably run off the exhaust from the 4t, LOL! Making a clean 2 stroke is not the problem, just look at outboard 2 strokes, snowmobiles, 2 stroke deisel freighter engines, etc. The issue here is that the big companies do not make the same sort of profit from a 2 stroke design. So they market and sell 4 strokes. Very simple.

KDX wasn't a closed course bike, it was marketed as an enduro, and therefor has to meet EPA emissions for use on public land. That's what ultimately killed it. Current carbed two strokes just can't come close on the HC emissions regulations. These applied to bikes manufactured after January 1st, 2006.

And you are right, 4 stroke race bikes aren't a lot better. But the off road versions are. Why do you think WR's and CRF-X's come choked down, jetted lean as can be, use air pumps, etc etc etc? Emissions.

KTM gets away with it by not selling their bikes with a spark arrestor and calling them closed course competition models.

Lots of information about it on EPA's website.

Enjoy them will you can.

The decent used ones get bought up pretty quickly now.

KDX wasn't a closed course bike, it was marketed as an enduro, and therefor has to meet EPA emissions for use on public land. That's what ultimately killed it.

Interesting logic, however false it is. I suppose it's just coincidental that they stopped selling the kx250 at about the same time? :thumbsup:

It was a marketing decision, pure and simple. The EPA never had anything to do with it.

Interesting logic, however false it is. I suppose it's just coincidental that they stopped selling the kx250 at about the same time? :thumbsup:

It was a marketing decision, pure and simple. The EPA never had anything to do with it.

Agree, EPA had nothing to do with it. KDX was closed course. As is a WR, XR, CRFX, etc. etc. If you could get a plate for it, by that I mean like factory dualsport, then it would have been subject to EPA regulations.

Emissions has absolutely NOTHING to do with hit.

Not true. Maybe where you live it doesn't, but where I do, it does.

Here in California, any bike that doesn't meet emission standards set by C.A.R.B., gets a red sticker instead of a green sticker. So at the end of this month, my 2003 KDX220 won't be legal to ride on public land in my area till next October 1st. There are different season lengths in different areas. Some public land never allows red sticker bikes at any time, some areas allow them all the time. Both two strokes and any four stroke designated for close course competition have to get a red sticker. Any four stroke that can be green stickered will have a California emission control sticker on it from the manufacturer. The cut off date for this stupid ruling was 2002, so my 1986 KDX200 will still be legal to ride all summer long. My KLX300 has a California emission sticker on it and was jetted really lean to make sure that it passed.

This law hastened the demise of the two stroke enduro bike in the state of California as sure as anything could have. People didn't want to buy a machine for riding on public land that was denied access or restricted. Dealers didn't like to put the machines on their showroom floors in my area.

Edited by dirt duchess
KDX wasn't a closed course bike, it was marketed as an enduro, and therefor has to meet EPA emissions for use on public land.

KTM gets away with it by not selling their bikes with a spark arrestor and calling them closed course competition models.

What about the 200, 250, and 300 XC-W? Spark arrestor, and very off road legal on public land.

No matter what the reason, it ran its course and is gone for good :thumbsup:. Time to move on...

No matter what the reason, it ran its course and is gone for good :thumbsup:. Time to move on...

Maybe ill go buy one, throw a sheet over it and leave it for 25 years. Then it might be worth something

Every other bike I see around here is a new KTM 2 stroke.

Not to change the subject or anything. Another bike that would be cool to bring back from the dead would be the Yamaha IT175 and IT200. I own a KDX200 and love it, but I just thought that those bikes would be cool to if Yamaha ever wanted to bring back a 2 stroke trail bike.

Little Jeff

I love the old IT's!

Interesting logic, however false it is. I suppose it's just coincidental that they stopped selling the kx250 at about the same time? :thumbsup:

It was a marketing decision, pure and simple. The EPA never had anything to do with it.

Agree, EPA had nothing to do with it. KDX was closed course. As is a WR, XR, CRFX, etc. etc. If you could get a plate for it, by that I mean like factory dualsport, then it would have been subject to EPA regulations.
What about the 200, 250, and 300 XC-W? Spark arrestor, and very off road legal on public land.

http://www.epa.gov/otaq/regs/nonroad/2002/f02039.pdf

http://www.epa.gov/otaq/regs/nonroad/2002/f02039.pdf

http://www.epa.gov/otaq/regs/nonroad/2002/f02039.pdf

Off road recreation bikes built since January 1st, 2006 have had to meet emissions. I'm not talking road legal bikes, but anything that is to be used on public land for anything other than sanctioned competition. The above documents touch on some of what's recreation, what's exempt, and what the emissions standards are for 06, and 07+. Bikes like the WR, KDX, CRF-X, etc NEED TO MEET EMISSIONS STANDARDS.

The XC-W 2 strokes do not come with spark arrestors, they ARE closed course competition bikes. This has started since the emissions regulations began on recreation bikes as stated above.

http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=914034

Maybe the KDX went away because of sales, maybe it went away due to emissions. I can say that they could not keep selling it because of the emissions. The KX's that are closed course bikes continued to 2007 model year, it wasn't killed as 2006's like the KDX. I work for a company that's quite involved in all this and get lots of updates, documentation of changes, etc etc. I say with 100% confidence EMISSIONS REGULATIONS APPLY TO OFF ROAD BIKES.

To the argument that the CRF-X, WR, etc are closed course bikes and not subject to emissions, then why the heck would the manufactures add everything to make them pass emissions? Why not just tune their MX bikes a little different for off road instead of investing R&D time, money, etc into air pumps, choked down silencers, unrideable lean jetting, etc?

http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=424493

Edited by adam728
fixed link

I don't how it is anywhere else, but in CA they call it Non Compliant and give them a red sticker. From central cal south, they are allowed on public land only the winter half of the year. Up north where I live, all bikes are allowed all year. Still plenty of ktm and yami 2 st's being sold and ridden. :thumbsup:

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