Someone poke holes in this please

I've recently gotten into cycling and read some interesting things. Boiling it down what i'm going to base this on is your body learns to burn whatever it is that you eat.

Ex. Eat a lot of carbs, body gets very good at burning sugar, you gain fat as it stores it.

So, what I don't get is why not do a (% of Cal. wise) high fat diet?

Reason being, if your body is taking in a lot of fat, it learns to burn fat, and as result as long as your taking in the correct amount of Cal. the amount of fat in the body will decrease.

As much as this sounds cool i know it can't be right, so someone please tell me what i'm missing.

WEll, here's a few facts to throw into the hopper--

When you do hard fast exertion close to your lactic threshhold, you are burning carbs--they are fast access, fast burning energy. But your body can't store a lot of carbs/glucose for that kind of exertion, about an hour's worth for full on effort(your fitness level affects this of course, but not that much on how much your body can store).

WHen you do long slow effort, you burn fat(and anything inbetween slow and fast is a mix of fat/carb, towards slow more fat, towards fast more carb). Lots of long slow effort taeches your body to burn fat. If you're out of shape your body will want to burn your carb/glucose because it's such a quick easy energy resource--and your heart rate is up there anyways because you're out of breath and out of shape.

Now when you do cardio to the goal of making your cardio system more efficient--meaning your heart can beat slower than previously needed because your heart pump is stronger, and can push more volume of blood per beat/stroke--you can conserve that carb/glucose for when you *really* need it and burn fat. Your cardio training is what teaches your body to burn fat(ie to access it and convert it quicker to energy).

It's all related to heart rate and your cardio efficiency.

People who do long term endurance stuff, like say hiking the Pacific Crest Trail for 4-5 months on end, obviously burn off most of their fat. Once that happens(well actually long before they get stringy), they CRAVE fatty foods, that's why you hear people downing entire gallons of ice cream and jars of peanut butter--the fatfatfat. Fat is much more calorie dense than carbs(handily). Sure a high fat diet is totally appropriate for people who are walking across America, or living in extreme cold(your body can't produce good heat from carbs or protein).

The thing is we are evolutionarily designed to be running around chasing down our infrequent supper. Storing fat from gorging on mastadon is GOOD. But now we have modern man who sits on his butt and can eat whenever he pleases, and things get out of whack FAST. Yes, survivally speaking, your body will make the best of whatever you can put into it, crap or not--but LIVING that way on purpose(eating crap as if it's just as good as quality nourishment) only produces crap PERFORMANCE results.

There is no magic pill/formula/voodoo.

I've recently gotten into cycling and read some interesting things. Boiling it down what i'm going to base this on is your body learns to burn whatever it is that you eat.

Ex. Eat a lot of carbs, body gets very good at burning sugar, you gain fat as it stores it.

So, what I don't get is why not do a (% of Cal. wise) high fat diet?

Reason being, if your body is taking in a lot of fat, it learns to burn fat, and as result as long as your taking in the correct amount of Cal. the amount of fat in the body will decrease.

As much as this sounds cool i know it can't be right, so someone please tell me what i'm missing.

WELL you're only missing a small BUT KEY component for this outcome. That is that you need to be working out at a low HR.

What you're eluding to is BASE training. Base training must be at least 8 weeks in length to get any real benefit from it. Benefits include increased VO2, higher base HR power output, a body that will READILY burn fat, greater endurance ect.ect.ect.

During this 8 week period an athlete CAN NOT break their designated HR ceiling (default max HR during base is generally accepted as 128 BPM), if the ceiling is broken it will set you back aprox. 3 weeks.

You NEED to be at this lower HR to burn fat, this is because of the increased time and energy it takes to process fat into "fuel". The athletes I caoch are to avoid carbs like the plague during base and can take in as much fat and protein as they want (all within reason of course). Interestingly enough, this is when they loose the MOST weight as well as see their colesterol levels drop.

Feel free to PM me if you want more details or are interested in coaching services.:thumbsup:

you're forgetting the part that if you eat more than you burn, it will turn to fat. the end.

eat high fat or high carbs or whatever, but don't eat more than you burn.

WELL you're only missing a small BUT KEY component for this outcome. That is that you need to be working out at a low HR.

What you're eluding to is BASE training. Base training must be at least 8 weeks in length to get any real benefit from it. Benefits include increased VO2, higher base HR power output, a body that will READILY burn fat, greater endurance ect.ect.ect.

During this 8 week period an athlete CAN NOT break their designated HR ceiling (default max HR during base is generally accepted as 128 BPM), if the ceiling is broken it will set you back aprox. 3 weeks.

You NEED to be at this lower HR to burn fat, this is because of the increased time and energy it takes to process fat into "fuel". The athletes I caoch are to avoid carbs like the plague during base and can take in as much fat and protein as they want (all within reason of course). Interestingly enough, this is when they loose the MOST weight as well as see their colesterol levels drop.

Feel free to PM me if you want more details or are interested in coaching services.:thumbsup:

hmmm so i was right. just left out the base part. Wonder why a person wont burn fat when pushed if they are on a similar diet. Then again, this is starting to sound like the atkins diet.

to llamaface: If i didn't state it initially i did mean that overall caloric intake was below what was burned.

The reason fat is not utilized at higher HR exertion levels is that fat takes TOO long to process. Carbs are readily converted to fuel,fat takes more time and energy.

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