DR maintenance

Hi To all;

I ride a 2005 DR650 with eibach springs, jet kit, and full FMF Q2 system. I love this bike and often ride 160km off road in a day - solo.

my question is this I want to have full confidence in my bike as I mostly ride solo in a remote area of British Columbia - Canada. I am very diligent towards my maintenance and do the following checks:

After every ride:

  • clean the bike,
  • check throttle and clutch cable free play and lube at regular intervals
  • adjust (if necessary) and lube chain
  • visual check of rims, tires and brakes

Every 1500km:

  • oil and filter change
  • air filter check and clean

At end of every season:

  • full oil and filter change
  • valve adjustment
  • run fuel stabilizer

Is there anything else that you guys do to keep your bikes running tip top?

Thanks

Paul

Looks like a good list. You might want to add checking your tire air pressures though.

Wow you change your oil that often? Thats not even 1000 mi

Here's a few other things you might want to add.

3000 miles (oil change):

check tightness of all visible nuts and bolts

clean or replace fuel filter

check/clean battery connections

7500 miles:

new sparkplugs

once/year:

flush brake fluid

clean and lightly oil secondary air filter (pod under seat)

10,000-15,000 miles:

change fork oil

...........shu

I ride a 2005 DR650.....
How many miles (ok, km's) on your DR? Nearing 23,000 miles on mine, 22k on the original chain.
I love this bike and often ride 160km off road in a day - solo.
I ride solo myself. Some time ago, another rider (and Canadian, I think), was alone and slipped off the trail. He was bumping over a downed tree, high centered on the tree and slid down almost to a creek. He removed the tank, seat, tires, and forks, before he was able to drag his bike back up to the trail. I'm not saying this to scare you, I'm saying 'never quit'. I would have sat by the bike and cried until I starved. :worthy: Bring food. Anytime you're working on your bike, use the bike toolkit. No fair using shop tools, they won't be available when you need them.
After every ride:
  • check throttle and clutch cable free play and lube at regular intervals
When I replaced my stock throttle tube for a quicker one, I found my return cable starting to fray (up by the mirror), somewhere around 20k miles. $64 :confused:
visual check of rims, tires and brakes

Check your spokes once inna while. I carry both tubes in a front fender bag, no reason to put the wrong size in and have to replace it later. My front axle removes from the right side, the rear axle removes from the left side; this means, front flat, lay the bike on its left side. Rear flat, lay the bike on the right side. Don't lay your bike down on a flat surface, it's really heavy. So lay it against a bank (bank: at the edge of the road, not something you rob. :smirk: ) A rock or tree (even a live one) will work.

Every 1500km:
  • oil and filter change
You're wasting time, money and energy. Suzuki recommends 4,000 miles with dino oil. I change at 3500. I use a full synthetic automotive oil (Mobil 1), none of that $14 a quart for me.
air filter check and clean

Since I ride solo (no dust from other riders), my first air filter clean was somewhere over 10k miles. It was not overly dirty. I'm using the stock filter, a good piece in my opinion.
Thanks

Paul

Here's a few other things you might want to add.

3000 miles (oil change):

check tightness of all visible nuts and bolts

clean or replace fuel filter

Check the fuel filter, it's located in the carb inlet tube; right where the fuel line attaches to the carb. When you pull the line off, there's a white nylon ring on the end of that 90* spigot. That's the filter.
check/clean battery connections
Tightend my battery terminals again, they seem to be loose every year.
7500 miles:

new sparkplugs

I use Iridium plus (after 15k on the originals), they'll last forever; well, they'll last until I don't care. :busted:
once/year:

clean and lightly oil secondary air filter (pod under seat)

I learned online to buy a Briggs and Stratton air filter. Cut a piece the diameter of the stocker, oil, and stuff it in on top of the original. :thumbsup:

Tighten NSU bolts behind clutch

Thanks to everyone - great list so far and lots of good input!

Craig (in Denver): I've got 16,000 km's on my bike and chain looks fine!

Ram1000: I might look stupid here but: what are the NSU bolts?

Looking for input on this one:

Instead of carrying tire irons/levers and tubes I carry a can of "fix-a-flat" it's supposed to seal and inflate car tires - is this a good idea? I understand that the tube and possibly the tire might be a throw away after but at least I get home - right?

Craig mentioned he replaced his original/stock chain at 22k (assuming miles) is this about normal?

No one has mentioned cam chain?? any thoughts??

Thanks again to all - I love this bike and this site! Happy (safe) riding to everyone

Thanks to everyone - great list so far and lots of good input!

Craig (in Denver): I've got 16,000 km's on my bike and chain looks fine!

Ram1000: I might look stupid here but: what are the NSU bolts?

Looking for input on this one:

Instead of carrying tire irons/levers and tubes I carry a can of "fix-a-flat" it's supposed to seal and inflate car tires - is this a good idea? I understand that the tube and possibly the tire might be a throw away after but at least I get home - right?

Craig mentioned he replaced his original/stock chain at 22k (assuming miles) is this about normal?

No one has mentioned cam chain?? any thoughts??

Thanks again to all - I love this bike and this site! Happy (safe) riding to everyone

Forget cam chain, not an issue. Don't touch anything.

Regular "Fix-A-Flat" will not work. A product like Ride-On or SLIME is a better bet. There are several others ... all meant to be put in the tube BEFORE you get a flat. Sometimes they only slow down air loss, other times you never know you have a puncture at all ... still other times ... they just won't work.

ALL are better than Fix a flat which rarely works on tubes.

You most definitely need to carry TWO spare tubes (21" on front fender, 17" or 18" in tail bag) and tire irons and tools and ... most importantly ... the knowledge and ability to fix a flat on the trail. If you've never done this ... then you shouldn't be out there. Statistic waiting to happen! :thumbsup:

This is so basic.

The other thing NOT to neglect is your battery. If it's over 3 years old ... just replace it. Riding solo can have real dangers if you get stuck. If the bike tips over it can be hard to start. Do you know proper starting technique after bike has been on its side? Or upside down? Or under water? Or do you just keep cranking needlessly until your very small and feeble DR battery is stone dead?

Install a headlight switch for starting ... so when key is on ... headlight is not on ... until you turn it on. Saves battery life big time. If you doubt any of this ... try to bump start your DR on flat ground in sand, loose gravel or mud.

Most everything else will give adequate warning of impending doom ... things like chain, sprockets, brakes, bad cables and more should all be obvious when getting close to needing service.

Riding solo in BC I'd be concerned with what CAN get you STUCK unexpectedly and have you walking out 20 miles in the dark back to civilization. Been there, Done that. :confused:

Five P's here all apply!

Prior Preparation Prevents Poor Performance.

I am a soloist too. I am really over paranoid about flats, so I carry a spare tube, patch kit, slime as well as tire irons, soap, baby powder. My current tubes are the super heavy duty ones.

I also carry runners with me - I dont want to walk 10s of kms in my offroad boots.

Craig in Denver has a good point about using only the tools in your kit bag.

I am on van isle, near vic - where are you?

Check your spokes once inna while. I carry both tubes in a front fender bag, no reason to put the wrong size in and have to replace it later. My front axle removes from the right side, the rear axle removes from the left side; this means, front flat, lay the bike on its left side. Rear flat, lay the bike on the right side. Don't lay your bike down on a flat surface, it's really heavy. So lay it against a bank (bank: at the edge of the road, not something you rob. :thumbsup: ) A rock or tree (even a live one) will work.

In order to make such interesting trail or roadside fixes much easier I am considering getting the kientech tool carrier and their simple stand.

http://www.kientech.com/DR650Tools.htm

DR650SimpleStand.jpg

Some sort of tool tube is not a bad idea. Everyone has there own way of dealing with this. Some do a PVC tube up under the skid plate, others attach a huge tube in place of the stock tool holder. Just remember, a big tool tube means lots of tools ... which equals LOTS OF EXTRA WEIGHT! So only bring along what you really really need. You won't be rebuilding your motor on the side of the road.

I have gone back to the stock tool holder but carry a few other things in luggage. I also carry two tire irons between frame and bash plate (zip tied in) and another 10" Ty Davis Iron in my tail bag.

Be sure to carry a valve core remover you won't be able to break bead without removing this.

I invented a lift stand and posted it up back in 2006 when I first got my DR650. Since then several have come up with good ones for sale. I stopped carrying mine and just improvise using rocks, lumber, stumps or whatever is laying around. If you can easily stash the lift then get it ... or make your own. Very easy to do with a simple piece of conduit. I used an old Tripod leg from a broken Tripod. Super light weight, adjustable.

You most definitely need to carry TWO spare tubes (21" on front fender, 17" or 18" in tail bag) and tire irons and tools and ... most importantly ... the knowledge and ability to fix a flat on the trail. If you've never done this ... then you shouldn't be out there. Statistic waiting to happen! :thumbsup:

This is so basic.

If the bike tips over it can be hard to start. Do you know proper starting technique after bike has been on its side? Or upside down? Or under water?

[/b]

Thanks again everyone - great input!

54321: I guess I've been pushing my luck with a can of so-called confidence (read: Fix-A-Flat) in my back-pack! Does anyone know a good link to an on-line how-to or 101 for trail side tire tube replacements/repairs??

As for the "proper technique" for starting after a tip over - I guess I have no idea? I've had trouble in the past but with my finger on the start button and persistence it has always eventually started (thank god!). what is the correct technique - very interested.

Would be great to compile a list of "essential tools" on here too? You know the bare minimum?

beginning to think I should spend less time on preventative maintenance and start learning how to do the emergency trail-side repairs!

Thanks again everyone.

Oh almost forgot - "ClakTap" i'm in Tofino, Van isle, great riding out here!!

I am a soloist too. I am really over paranoid about flats, so I carry a spare tube, patch kit, slime as well as tire irons, soap, baby powder. My current tubes are the super heavy duty ones.

I also carry runners with me - I dont want to walk 10s of kms in my offroad boots.

Craig in Denver has a good point about using only the tools in your kit bag.

I am on van isle, near vic - where are you?

Excellent info, especially the light weight running shoes.

I have most always fixed my flats with a patch, (if you can't break the bead , ride it a bit and it will break)

The times that a patch wouldn't work, Slime usually did. I had a front pinch flat and once and I filled the tire with slime, found the 3/8" long tear in the tube and pinched it tight with my fingers while adding air with a 12V Slime compressor.

It got me home (40+ miles) and didn't go flat again until the following day.

I hate dismounting wheels in the woods, once the wheel is off changing the tube is easy.

I always try everything before pulling the wheel off, and if I have to pull the wheel off you can bet there's going to be a brand new tube of the correct size going back in. Thats why I carry both a front and rear tube.

Just my opinion from many years of off road riding, YFMV (your flats may vary) :confused::thumbsup:

Thanks again everyone - great input!

54321: I guess I've been pushing my luck with a can of so-called confidence (read: Fix-A-Flat) in my back-pack! Does anyone know a good link to an on-line how-to or 101 for trail side tire tube replacements/repairs??

As for the "proper technique" for starting after a tip over - I guess I have no idea? I've had trouble in the past but with my finger on the start button and persistence it has always eventually started (thank god!). what is the correct technique - very interested.

Would be great to compile a list of "essential tools" on here too? You know the bare minimum?

beginning to think I should spend less time on preventative maintenance and start learning how to do the emergency trail-side repairs!

Thanks again everyone.

Oh almost forgot - "ClakTap" i'm in Tofino, Van isle, great riding out here!!

Flats

There are some good U Tubes on tire changing. Do some searches ... they should come up. Also, go to ADV rider and search in both Garage and Thumpers forum for Neduro's (ned) tire changing video. I don't have links handy.

Starting after Tip Over

If you had ever owned a kick start four stroke then you would probably already know this. But the DR has the same problems ... the difference is you've got that electric leg to help out.

Once the bike has been on its side for a while, or upside down, it will FLOOD.

You may see some gas pour out ... normal.

Always be aware of your limited cranking time ... never crank more than you need to.

1. headlight OFF

2. Key ON

3. Neutral NOT in gear!

4. Clutch In, side stand up

5. Throttle held WIDE OPEN

6. Crank her over ... but no more than 5 seconds

It will probably start ... but if not

7. wait two or three minutes and repeat ... throttle WIDE OPEN and crank her over

why throttle wide open? This allows massive amount of air flow through the cylinder, which will evaporate excess fuel more quickly.

I won't go into dealing with a flooded bike here ... maybe someone who has experience ... and recovered their bike successfully can post up.

Tools

Tools are person choice ... I like the best i can afford. Use the tools in your on bike tool kit to work on your bike at home. This will help point you to what more you need .... or don't need. Make sure you have correct tools for removing wheels and changing tires.

Make sure you can remove your fuel tank. Always carry a small kit of spare OEM sizes of nuts, bolts, washers. Zip Ties, Super Glue, Quik Aluminum or two part JB Weld or similar. Pack your tubes so they will not be damaged.

Leave levers just slightly loose so in a fall they can rotate rather than break off. (old enduro riders trick)

Most times by doing good maintenance and prep before your rides will mean you will never have an issue.

Buy the AMP case guards for the DR650. Life savers, IMHO.

Read my thread for a few more ideas:

http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=915234

Excellent info, especially the light weight running shoes.

I have most always fixed my flats with a patch, (if you can't break the bead , ride it a bit and it will break)

The times that a patch wouldn't work, Slime usually did. I had a front pinch flat and once and I filled the tire with slime, found the 3/8" long tear in the tube and pinched it tight with my fingers while adding air with a 12V Slime compressor.

It got me home (40+ miles) and didn't go flat again until the following day.

I hate dismounting wheels in the woods, once the wheel is off changing the tube is easy.

I always try everything before pulling the wheel off, and if I have to pull the wheel off you can bet there's going to be a brand new tube of the correct size going back in. Thats why I carry both a front and rear tube.

Just my opinion from many years of off road riding, YFMV (your flats may vary) :worthy::thumbsup:

Good stuff Bob! :confused:

Couple notes on SLIME. Generally you can't patch or plug a Slime'd tube. Patch won't stick ... and once SLIME gets under the patch it will work its way off pretty quick. SLIME is good for small punctures and can really save you.

But if you've Slime'd a tube and it goes flat ... just change it out. If you wash all the SLIME off you can patch it later ... at home, with a beer! :busted:

Don't waste time on the trail ... RIDE. I never, ever patch a tube on the Trail. Swap in new tube, deal with old tube later ... or throw it away if it's ruined .... as it often will be if you've ridden on it for a while. Some guys don't know they've got a flat and keep riding. Tube ruined.

Slime the bastard! then hit the trails!

Change your own tires, that'll bring ya right up to speed. Always change your own tires and you'll be comfortable if it happens on the trail.

At home use water with some dish soap in a spray bottle.

but at least I get home - right?

Wrong: last roadside flat (rear), 60 miles from the truck, Utah desert @ 105*, used my diet coke (no sticky sugar) as lube. Previously I'd ridden a flat for 40 miles. Not feeling like putting the tube in, this time I headed back to the truck (all dirt). But the tire was off the rim almost immediately, impossibe to ride. Crap. Two 15" irons and one short one (10" maybe).

I carry walking shoes also, can't walk in my Crossfire boots.

Yes 22k miles, (about 30,000km to you) on the chain. More info: I lubed the chain after every ride (120-200 miles), chain wax has little fling off (black and gold can), day trips only and no mud.

Matches, you may be spending the night, which would suck. But freezing into a popsicle would really suck.

NSU:

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=14659217&postcount=15

54321 already said: headlight off switch, bike in neutral, every amp counts and clutch drag is a huge drain.

I use valve core removers on both valve stems instead of the plastic caps. Steel (stainless?), not those crappy plastic ones. So I always have at least one.

Don't run the valve stem nuts against the rim, put the valve cap on and run the nut OUT to the valve cap. Yes, the nut is away from the rim, maybe 1/2": 10mm. Finger tight is good. If your tire is slipping on the rim, the valve stem will lean in the hole, instead of ripping out of the tube. Make sure the rim hole it large enough to let the stem lean both directions, if not, use a round file to oval the hole a little bit.

Really excellent info' thanks again.

I too love the running shoe idea - I've done plenty of mini hikes in my moto boots (up to waterfalls, top of rocky bluffs for better vantage points etc) and I reckon I'm more likely to injure myself walking in those bloody things than by coming off my bike!!

I'm going to do some research on the trail-side tire repair and no-doubt I'll have more questions but in the mean-time:

How does this slime stuff work? do you have to rotate the tire after squirting it in? or just put air in directly after? how big of a puncture will this work for? do you guys mostly carry CO2 or hand pumps?

Is 22k miles about normal for the stock chain or is the chain overdue at this point? I know to look for tell-tale signs: hooked sprocket teeth and the need for constant adjustment - then there's the 'X' number of links per 'X' inches/cm test.

stay rubber side down (hopefully on inflated rubber)!

22K miles on the stock DR650 chain is very good. You must conservatively ... I cooked my stock chain in about 12K or 15K miles.

If you want (or care about) really long chain life, replace with a DID VM-2 X ring chain. I prefer OEM sprockets ... as they last the longest. If you want to mess around with off road gearing then you'll have to find JT sprockets or others ... or do a 520 conversion.

You're missing the point with SLIME! (most do) It's not a post puncture product like Fix a Flat. You put SLIME in now ... before you ever get a flat. Also, do a search ... there are several other BETTER products than SLIME .... but its the most common. Check out Ride-On ... and there are at least two or three other new similar products ... most BETTER than SLIME.

Wrong: last roadside flat (rear), 60 miles from the truck, Utah desert @ 105*, used my diet coke (no sticky sugar) as lube. Previously I'd ridden a flat for 40 miles. Not feeling like putting the tube in, this time I headed back to the truck (all dirt). But the tire was off the rim almost immediately, impossibe to ride. Crap. Two 15" irons and one short one (10" maybe).

Good stuff Craig!

I carry little hotel shampoo bottles in my Camel Back for tire lube. I have the big one with some storage pouches, I carry essentials in there like : Valve stem tool, Lighter (better than matches), Quik Aluminum, Epoxy, Super Glue, rubber gloves, Simple Green (tiny tube for clean up), razor, 1st Aid, Wound Glue, CASH, Whistle, Sun Screen, spare nut & bolt kit, and a few other things.

Some soft tires can come off the rim ... won't ever happen with an Avon Distanzia! (street radial) very hard to break the bead on that one.

Matches, you may be spending the night, which would suck. But freezing into a popsicle would really suck.
As I said, I carry a Bic lighter. Reliable. In an emergency you can light off your bike to send a signal. Seen it done in the Mojave years ago. But if you run out of gas ... hmmm ... then it won't burn as well. :thumbsup:

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