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Air Filter Cleaning

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What a joke that design is! I read some suggested taking the sub frame off so as to not dump a bunch of dirt into the intake boot! I had it off anyway so I could go through the shock at Enzo Racing. I don't know how anyone can tale the filter out otherwise. Mine was filthy on 04-2 but I bet 2-4 tablespoons of silt were left in the bottom of the airbox after I wrangled it out while I was balancing the airbox on the tip of the rear fender.

For as dirty as the filter was there was no dirt in the throat of the air boot!

Joe

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I have to agree to an extent...after seeing my buddy's KTM...easiest access you could think of. Clean and replace to your heart's desire. I don't look forward to messing with mine.

However, our airbox is much more sealed than his. If you rotate the filter inside the airbox, it comes right out. Not as easy as it could be, but maybe better than the mess you described.

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It isn't that bad when the subframe is on the bike. Like the above post says just turn it in the box and you can get it out easy. I would rather remove and clean the airfilter then change the rear tire.

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I had just bought the bike and with as bad as the filter was no way would I have done it with the subframe. With my maintainence schedule you are correct.

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I always pull the subframe and airbox when I service the air filter. Once you get the hang of it, removing and reassembling the subframe and airbox only takes a few minutes each way. After you degrease the airbox, you can rest assured that no dirt ever enters your engine during filter service. Installing the cleaned/oiled filter in the bare airbox is also much easier with the subframe out of the way.

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I've never taken off my subrame and airbox on any of my bikes I've owned to clean my airfilter and nor do I ever get any dirt down inside of my air boot. That just seems like wayyyyyy to much work to change out an air filter to me...:thumbsup::thumbsup:

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I've never taken off my subrame and airbox on any of my bikes I've owned to clean my airfilter and nor do I ever get any dirt down inside of my air boot. That just seems like wayyyyyy to much work to change out an air filter to me...:thumbsup::thumbsup:

5 minutes off, and 5 minutes on is way too much work?

You may believe that you've never dropped any dirt in your airboot, but the CRF airbox design makes that impossible to verify. Spending 10 extra minutes working on your bike can guarantee that never happens. It's also how the factory mechanics do it, if that means anything.

"An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure."

Ben Franklin

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5 minutes off, and 5 minutes on is way too much work?

You may believe that you've never dropped any dirt in your airboot, but the CRF airbox design makes that impossible to verify. Spending 10 extra minutes working on your bike can guarantee that never happens. It's also how the factory mechanics do it, if that means anything.

"An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure."

Ben Franklin

This is ridiculous. Take off the seat. Take the screw out of the air filter. Turn the air filter sideways and pull out. Clean airbox. Install new filter.

I run in some dusty conditions and have 3 honda's. I have never and will never take the subframe off to get to the air filter.

I think you need to practice this with a clean airbox and filter a few times. You will see that it might take only an extra 10 minutes to take the subframe off, but that gives you more time to drink a beer after your done. Seriously, do not take your subframe off to clean your filter. :thumbsup:

FYI... I always wipe the inner airboot down after the filter is off with a damp rag

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You may think it's ridiculous, but if Honda hires you to wrench on one of their factory bikes, you'll be pulling the subframe and airbox every time you service the bike. It's a very easy job to ensure that everything is surgically clean.

BTW, I've been riding CRF450's twice a week for eight years and have never had to shim a single original OEM Ti intake valve on any of my personal bikes. Your results may differ.

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for those that don't remove the subframe to change the filters, on tip i use on my two crf450's is to be sure the front of the bike is higher than the rear on the stand. Even if that means having it hang off the back of the stand a bit. Doing so gets the air box opening closer to vertical.. making it harder for any dirt to drop in.

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i pretty sure that the factory mechanics take the subframe off because it is there FULL TIME job to take care of the factory bikes....now if you had all day to work on a bike i think you might take the subframe off....

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i pretty sure that the factory mechanics take the subframe off because it is there FULL TIME job to take care of the factory bikes....now if you had all day to work on a bike i think you might take the subframe off....

It takes 5 minutes to remove it and 5 minutes to reinstall it.

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For me it is 1 minute to remove and 2 minutes to install. You learn to turn it a certain angle then its no big deal. The most time consuming part is cleaning the airbox itself.

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For me it is 1 minute to remove and 2 minutes to install. You learn to turn it a certain angle then its no big deal. The most time consuming part is cleaning the airbox itself.

And tthe angle is?

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And tthe angle is?

the angle is not having to take the subframe off to change an air filter, but doing so that no dirt gets in the boot. I just don't see the problem doing so if you have a routine and are even sort of careful. I also can see that after you have taken the subframe off a few dozen times, it would be faster than finding the right "angle" the filter/cage has to fit in and learn to line up the filter bolt .. :thumbsup: Pick your poison.

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the angle is not having to take the subframe off to change an air filter, but doing so that no dirt gets in the boot. I just don't see the problem doing so if you have a routine and are even sort of careful. I also can see that after you have taken the subframe off a few dozen times, it would be faster than finding the right "angle" the filter/cage has to fit in and learn to line up the filter bolt .. :thumbsup: Pick your poison.

Im looking for my sign right now! I think it fell into the air boot!

Lol

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For me it is 1 minute to remove and 2 minutes to install. You learn to turn it a certain angle then its no big deal. The most time consuming part is cleaning the airbox itself.

Cleaning the airbox definitely takes more time than getting it off the bike. My process starts with spraying WD40 into the interior of the box and boot to loosen the air filter oil and crud. After a few minutes of soaking in WD40, I spray the entire airbox with Shout stain remover and let it soak for a few more minutes before blasting it out with a water hose. The final product is a like new spotless airbox, with no scrubbing required.

While I'm doing that, I soak all the fasteners with Shout in a coffee can. Then I rinse them off and give them a soak in WD40. This ensures that there is no grit in the threads so that everything goes back to smoothly and prolongs all aluminum threads in the chassis.

The time I spent working for a Supercross team may have made me anal about service, but I was probably already anal to start with. I like working on a clean bike. I'm not sure if this has anything to do with it but I've been riding a CRF450 since 2003 and I've never had to even shim any of my original OEM Ti valves.

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