Softest Tire available?

Hi there,

I habe used a Michelin Trial Comp. for over one year on my WR250F.

I´m happy with it. It provides a good overall experience. Braking however sometimes gets annoying.

I´m in search for a really soft Enduro tire for my second rim. A enduro tire with radial tread would be great but as far as I know, the Maxxis (http://www.maxxis.com/MotorcycleATV/Off-road/MASI-Maxxcross-Radial-SI-Rear.aspx) seems to be the only one and is not available in 18 inch..

So, what to buy - my current choice is Michelin S12?

Chris

Trials tires will be the softest by far

:-) I know them.

But what is the softest Enduro tire available?

Chris

Someone can correct me if I am wrong, but didn't a tire large manufacturer come out with a race specific tire that is a softer compound? I thought I read about this in a magazine a while ago (maybe dunlop?) I think it wore pretty quickly though.

The s12 is a good tyre but loses grip as soon as the knobs wear even a little... the Michelin starcross ms3 is better. Both of these are fairly rigid carcass tyres though... I've started using bridgestone 203/4's lately and they are fantastic... Softer carcass so you can run them at very low pressures for extra grip and they wear extremely well, plus have as much grip as an ms3 or s12. I've tried just about everything else and always end up

coming back to the ms3 or the bridgestones.

Try a Kenda Milleville sticky at 8 psi. That's what I like instead of a trials tire. Similar feel but with better breaking and sand traction.

Are you asking for a soft compound, or a soft terrain tire? They are opposites.

Soft terrain tires like the S12 are harder rubber than the hard terrain tires, which are soft rubber.

Make sense?

Our tracks are mainly slicky, root-planted with some stones in there.

The trial tire does good but in some situations - where digging is needed - it completely fails..

Chris

The s12 is a good tyre but loses grip as soon as the knobs wear even a little... the Michelin starcross ms3 is better. Both of these are fairly rigid carcass tyres though... I've started using bridgestone 203/4's lately and they are fantastic... Softer carcass so you can run them at very low pressures for extra grip and they wear extremely well, plus have as much grip as an ms3 or s12. I've tried just about everything else and always end up

coming back to the ms3 or the bridgestones.

I beg to differ. I currently have an s12 rear and front on my TE 450, the rear has about 10% of tread left, and I am still amazed and how much grip it has. It grips more than some new tires I have tried.

And the front tire, oh man that's another amazing tire! It wears EXTREMELY well, best wearing front tire I've had, and also the best gripping front tire I've had period.

But my terrain is most likely different to what you ride on.

Are you asking for a soft compound, or a soft terrain tire? They are opposites.

Soft terrain tires like the S12 are harder rubber than the hard terrain tires, which are soft rubber.

Make sense?

This may be true of some tires but definitely not S12s. I have torn all knobs almost completely off in ~200 miles of riding in rocky terrain in WV, as opposed to riding all year long on an S12 rear in the sandy and loamy terrain where I live. Other people in my group had Maxxis ITs that had no noticeable wear from that weekend. Tires are made with more than traction in mind. Longevity is also a concern, so I would actually argue the opposite of what you're saying. This is why S12s chunk bad in rocky terrain - they are soft. A set of hard terrain tires will dry rot and fling apart around here before you wear them down.

I beg to differ. I currently have an s12 rear and front on my TE 450, the rear has about 10% of tread left, and I am still amazed and how much grip it has. It grips more than some new tires I have tried.

And the front tire, oh man that's another amazing tire! It wears EXTREMELY well, best wearing front tire I've had, and also the best gripping front tire I've had period.

But my terrain is most likely different to what you ride on.

:thumbsup:I second this. I love my S12s, especially the front. The fronts surpass any other tire I've ever used in soft terrain, and last pretty long too.

This may be true of some tires but definitely not S12s. I have torn all knobs almost completely off in ~200 miles of riding in rocky terrain in WV, as opposed to riding all year long on an S12 rear in the sandy and loamy terrain where I live.

...I would actually argue the opposite of what you're saying. This is why S12s chunk bad in rocky terrain - they are soft.

Hard is not always tough. The statement regarding "hard" and "soft" tires is accurate: tires are labeled one way or other based on the terrain they're intended for, not on the rubber compound used. "Soft" tires will generally have smaller, harder, and taller blocks spaced farther apart, and with less radius at the base to push deeper into soft surfaces. "Hard" tires will generally have larger blocks spaced more closely to increase the rubber contact on hard packed surfaces, along with softer rubber for better adhesion, and the blocks will be shorter and more radiused at the base to prevent the blocks from squirming and rolling out of contact under lateral pressure.

The best tires used a different compound at the top of the block than at the base, and sometimes yet another for the carcass so that they can dial in exactly what they want.

Rocks are always a problem, and soft terrain tires are usually not a good choice, but it's actually because they're harder that they tear.

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