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Is this a good deal?

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I can get a 2004 CRF250 for about $1400. I'm wondering if I should jump on it or pass.

I'm new to motorcycles and perfectly happy with my YZ250F, but I'd like to get another bike to have around. Then some of my friends who can't afford a bike could ride with me or maybe I could get my brother into it... The point is I don't NEED it so I'm happy to pas if it's no good.

I've heard that Honda thumpers are hard on valves. This bike will probably never get raced and only ridden of trails or forest roads, will it still wear the valves quickly?

Is there anything in particular I should look for if I go to check it out? It seems like a really good price so I'm thinking there might be something wrong with it.

And just out of curiosity, I know I'm asking in the Honda forum, but how does it compare to my YZ?

Thanks!

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My daughter has 04 YZ250F and we've had absolutely no trouble with it, even after it endo'ed without her, started right up. lol We just got an 07 Honda CRF250F that already needs a valve adjustment (we got it for a good price and I think it needed one to begin with) - I've heard Hondas are famous for needing adjustments. We've never had trouble with my son's 08 Honda CRF150RB though... But I'm no expert by any means.

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I've heard that Honda thumpers are hard on valves. This bike will probably never get raced and only ridden of trails or forest roads, will it still wear the valves quickly?

I thought that was the case too, until I did a search on the Yamaha forum and looked into the topic. Turns out that the super-duper Yamaha valves don't have to be changed until usually around 100 or so hours, and many times will go as high as 200 hours. Well, turns out that's about the average valve life for the CRFs too. I think Honda riders got so used to nothing ever breaking that introducing a 100 hour service item was shocking.

The thing that has been showing up is that if you let dirt get past the air filter, it does in the valves very quickly. I suspect that a fair amount of the people who experience early valve failure either don't maintain their filters adequately, or were a victim of a filter that wasn't properly seated. There are also always defect-related failures too, and consensus is always going to be skewed to the bad side - the guys who aren't happy generally b*tch louder than those who don't have any problems. I know I'm like that.

JayC

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The price is very good for a running bike in good cosmetic condition. You will have to replace the valves at least once with stainless steel, and then it will be very reliable. Whether you do it in a month or five years, plan on it.

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your end cost is probably going to be 2000 after you get stainless steel valves, but after that you will not have a problem with the bike. its a very good deal, you will probably not have to drop that extra 600 dollars on valves for a while anyways.

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