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Oregon Oregon OHV? Any Vertical Rd marker OK ??

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Question about riding forest service roads in Oregon. Are all dirt roads marked with a vertical road number post legal to ride with drit bikes? I have not been successful with finding the answer to this question. I know some roads have 4 digit numbers some have 3.. Anyone know?

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Depends. Poeple need to have a Travel Map, from the Forest they are in, that lists the roads and trails that are open to motorized travel what time of year they are open, and to which kind: cars, jeeps, quads or bikes. The map(s) will also state if the vehicles need to be street legal to be on that route (road or trail). All the trails and roads should have a number on a post. Having a post with a number or not does not mean the route is open or closed. The road number post just may be missing. But more as a general rule, if a route does not have a numbered post, then it is not an open route, not open to any vehicle. Some have said in previous posts that we are responsible to know which route we are on, sign or no sign. I think the Forests have a responsibility to sign the routes to make the Travel Plans work for visitors.

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Question about riding forest service roads in Oregon. Are all dirt roads marked with a vertical road number post legal to ride with drit bikes? I have not been successful with finding the answer to this question. I know some roads have 4 digit numbers some have 3.. Anyone know?

The number system is a code. Basically, if its a 4 digit, let say 2332, that means you are 32 miles in on forest road 23 (assuming you are going the right direction). the main roads are 2 digits, while 4 digits turn off from those and those little 3 digits, well, I think they come off of a 2 3 or 4 digit and may go no where, ie dead end. Not sure what the marker means in miles.

I have no idea which is legal for OHV. I would assume the 2 digit roads would most likely be off limits without a street legal bike. But rule of thumb, if the road is open to public/traffic, no go with an OHV.

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I dont think there is a blanket answer to your question.

For example the Mt.Hood Forest used to be open to riding on forest service roads- unitl the eco shit heads and senator ron wyden got that overturned, now all roads are closed unless signed open = none are signed open. except a few small crappy riding riding areas, overused, and junky.

Eco maniacs patten themselves on the back saying "offroad / cross country travel is stopped - the forest is saved. As if people just point off into the woods and blaze a trail anywhere they want, apparently they are unfamiliar with the dense underbrush which makes this impossible.

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The Oregon OHV Safety card has this question on the test:

"What roads are legal for Off-road vechiles to ride on?"

The answer was "All gravel roads". Which is funny, as I doubt that's true.

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State Law - but make sure you look up the Code and understand it! 1.5 lane or less gravel road that is not on Federal Property. Forest Service units are regulated by the Travel Plan or MVUM depending on where the Federal Unit is in relationship to Motorized planning rule.

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Eco maniacs patten themselves on the back saying "offroad / cross country travel is stopped - the forest is saved. As if people just point off into the woods and blaze a trail anywhere they want, apparently they are unfamiliar with the dense underbrush which makes this impossible.

Not impossible - I see where people build new trails all the time, or they extend existing ones, or they build detours around obstacles. In very thick dense brush. And they often make a real mess of it too.

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The Forest Service has 5 classes of roads, Level 1 through 5. Level 1 roads are closed roads that are only used temporarily. Level 2 roads are the ones with the vertically numbered posts. These roads are "roughly graded and not suitable for sedan traffic", and are USUALLY open to OHV. Level 3 roads usually have a rectangular sign with horizontal numbers, are "smoothly graded and suitable for sedan traffic. Depending on your state and the local FS Travel Plan, these roads MAY be open to OHV use. Region 4 (CA) closed everything to OHV use except for Level 2 roads, and WA has a similar policy.

Level 4 and 5 roads are major arterial roads and either graveled or paved, and are usually closed to OHVs. These roads usually have a "shield" type sign plate and smaller numbers. Idaho has a "restricted use" license plate for OHVs that makes ALL roads EXCEPT state highways legal for OHVs.

Bottom line is that you need to check the FS "Motor Vehicle Use Map" (MVUM) for your local National Forest as well as your state law to see which roads are legal for what kinds of vehicles.

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