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best method to remove stripped bolt in cylinder (with a PIC)

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Hey, so that you know whats going on here's a picture:

http://i942.photobucket.com/albums/ad268/mikekx/strippedbolt.jpg

Using penetrene helped get the other bolts out (on other side), but didnt work on this one. They were all locktighted and really hard to unscrew - they must have welded themselves to the surrounding metal from getting hot and cold :thumbsup:

I snapped a hardened torx bit, then almost snapped another one. We tried an impact driver and it didnt work so we tried a 3/8 inch ratchet and the bolt head stripped. fair enough :confused: we did that after heating up the cylinder with a soft flame and gas bottle, but chickened out at like 80 degrees because we thought it'd warp the cylinder. but how can i get the bolt out now?

1) Weld an allen key or something similar in there and then try to remove it that way? bad idea? probably too small and the spatter would suck get everywhere.

2. drill out the screw without hurting the cylinder? :worthy::bonk:

what do you think?

Mike.

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typically, those loctited bolts will come out after you apply some heat. you're in a tough spot here. i usually will cut a straight slot in the bolt and use a flat headed screw driver, but i don't think that will work. a reverse threaded easy out may work here after you apply heat to it.

but....it's looking like you make have to drill that one out.

good luck, this type of stuff really sucks.

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mmmm....thats not gonna be an easy one, I'd say use and easy out, but make sure you use the right size, if not (like me) the easy out will break in there, too. Good luck

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typically, those loctited bolts will come out after you apply some heat. you're in a tough spot here. i usually will cut a straight slot in the bolt and use a flat headed screw driver, but i don't think that will work. a reverse threaded easy out may work here after you apply heat to it.

but....it's looking like you make have to drill that one out.

good luck, this type of stuff really sucks.

+1, exactly the advice I would give. If you know it is really in there and don't feel comfortable drilling it out yourself then I would suggest just taking it to a machine shop now and having them get it out. It will be easier for them to get it out the less messed up it is (and the more things you try the more messed up it will become).

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Sticking the whole thing in the oven might help, al expands 2x steel and the hole will open up around the bolt.

Maybe you can mig a nut on there.

Dave

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+1, exactly the advice I would give. If you know it is really in there and don't feel comfortable drilling it out yourself then I would suggest just taking it to a machine shop now and having them get it out. It will be easier for them to get it out the less messed up it is (and the more things you try the more messed up it will become).

+3

I have pride, but it sells off at a price. After my reasonable efforts are exhausted, let a guy who does it day in and out. My machine shop has an EDM for the toughies. The cost to remove a bolt is nearly always $20 cash. You have to figure in frustration and cost if you mess up.

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You can try an ez-out but you're going to need more heat than just what you had done. Another thing you can do is if you can get your hands on a drill press you can drill the head off the bolt like you do removing rivets but don't go so big that you ruin the retainer. After you get the head off you can remove the retainer and everything else and that should vice you more room to work with and even possibly enough room to be able to get some vise-grips on the stub of the bolt. What I would be worried about is if it's stuck in there tight enough that you couldn't get it out with the correct tools that an EZ-out will snap off.

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what i have done before with something like that was drill a hole in the middle and got a allen wrench a little bigger than the hole i drilled put some 5 min epoxy on allan shaft and pound into hole ...when epoxy set up and having an allen in a round hole after a little heat it came out.....this is just an option ..might not be the best but has worked for me

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+3

I have pride, but it sells off at a price. After my reasonable efforts are exhausted, let a guy who does it day in and out. My machine shop has an EDM for the toughies. The cost to remove a bolt is nearly always $20 cash. You have to figure in frustration and cost if you mess up.

$20 bucks to remove a potential nightmare like he's looking at?

That's a no-brainer.

Dave

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+3

I have pride, but it sells off at a price. After my reasonable efforts are exhausted, let a guy who does it day in and out. My machine shop has an EDM for the toughies. The cost to remove a bolt is nearly always $20 cash. You have to figure in frustration and cost if you mess up.

$20? don't even have to think about that one. hell, if it was $40, it's still worth it.

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You could try cutting a slot trough the head of the bolt using a dremel cutting tool and then use a impact driver with a flat head screwdriver end in the cut slot.

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I would weld a nut onto the top of the bolt, the heat from welding loosens it and then you can just put a socket on the nut and screw the bolt out. I have done this a couple times and it works well.

Here is a larger fastener I used that method on but it's the same principle.

IMAG0384.jpg

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That should come out fairly easy with an ez out. I've extracted more bolts than I care to remember. The problem was that you didn't use enough heat for your initial attempt. 80 degrees isn't going to do anything; you need to go to 300F to breakdown red loctite. If you are worried about warping it just put it in the oven as heating it uniformly would prevent that. That cyclinder is probably running close to that temperature anyway.

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You could try cutting a slot trough the head of the bolt using a dremel cutting tool and then use a impact driver with a flat head screwdriver end in the cut slot.

+1, a cutoff tool works well for making the notch also.

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I used to do this type of stuff at a place i used to work at removing broken bolts out of transmissions. I use a couple of methods. One is to drill it out. Once you drill deep enough to get the head to break off you can most likely get a hold of the rest of it with a small set of vise grips.

My personal favorite way is if you have a TIG welder to weld a nut to the top of it. After doing so tap it a couple times lightly with a hammer. This helps break the bond of loctite or even corrosion in some cases.

One other method i have found useful sometimes is to take a center punch. about half way out from the center of the bolt. Tap a punch mark straight down. Don't hit it too hard. But get the punch in fairly deep. Then tip it sideways so that it points in the direction the bolt needs to move to turn. Give it a firm tap or two. Sometimes it takes several hits to break it loose. One last thing you can try if that doesn't seem to be getting anywhere it to take a small torch and heat the bolt right in the center. Then like the weld method take a pin punch in the center of the bolt and tap it a few times. Then try the center punch. I can only think of a couple times that this method has not worked. Those times I ended up just drilling it out like method 1.

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Before drilling or welding, I would try to find an allen or torx that is slightly larger than what's left of the hole and (gently tap it into the hole with a hammer. You might have to file the tip of the bit a little. Then, try to remove with impact (the air or electric kind, not the hammer kind).

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Hey guys! I didnt need to drill it, it came out when I heated it upto roughly 180 degrees in an oven and used the punch idea :thumbsup::banana::confused:

thanks for all your suggestions guys, we couldn't of done it without ya :worthy:

Mike.

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