Rim Lacing Question

So I sent my suspension off to Factory Connection, and thought while I had the wheels off I would lace up some black rims :thumbsup:

I have never done this before, and I might have made a mistake. I ordered just the rims, thinking I could reuse my spokes. The bike is a 2010 with about 6 hours on it, so I was thinking they should still work. By the way the new rims are Moose rims. Was this a mistake? This is going to be my first wheel lace-up so it should be interesting. Also, do I need a spoke torque wrench? I only have a normal spoke wrench.

Thanks.

I don't know anything about the Moose rims. If they are "Stock replacements", the stock spokes should work. If it was me, I would upgrade spokes to Stainless Steel. You don't NEED a torque wrench, but it makes the job a little easier. Have fun. It's not rocket science, just require patience.

Moose rims are designed to work with the stock spokes.

you don't need a torque wrench but just take your time and pay attention. I have laced up 4 sets without a torque wrench and only a homemade truing stand.

Pay attention to the length of the spokes that come out of the hubs some may be longer than others depending on what side of the hub and if they are on the inside and outside.

Make sure you get your "run out" done first.. make sure that the hub is centered on the rim before going for truing left and right.

If you have not disassembled your stock wheels, put a straight edge across the disc rotor to the edge of the rim, measure from edge of rim to straight edge. Make sure you get back to this measurment with your new wheel. BTW, I personally prefer the stock spokes to aftermarket, prefer the stock rims as well, but I think the Moose ones are OK.

I haven't taken the old wheel apart yet, was planning on doing it tonight. Thanks for the heads up Jeffro.:thumbsup:

That's good to hear on the torque wrench. They are spendy little specialty tools.

Do I need to put anti-seize on the spoke threads when I re-assemble? I heard to do this, but that may be because the other guy was using stainless spokes.

Do I need to put anti-seize on the spoke threads when I re-assemble? I heard to do this, but that may be because the other guy was using stainless spokes.

I ant-isiezed mine the last time I did a rim. 3 years later I have just taken it off, no seized spokes.:thumbsup:

The spoke torque wrench is great on a brand new, true rim. It shows you how loose spokes are on a new bike. Mine were abotu 1 turn loose. Once tightened to the provided spec, they never loosened again.

As far as building a wheel, forget it. Think of it like this....it is possible to have a 4 inch and 5 inch spoke set to the same exact torque figure. How will that work for trueness?

Yes on the anti seize or oil the threads, no need for the torque wrench.

Tape off the spokes at their junction on the current wheel. Remove the spoke nipples and yes anti-seize is a great idea. Remove the old rim and lay the new one in it's place. Place the spokes in the correct holes in the new rim and start all of the nipples. Put the assembled wheel in either the forks or the swingarm, wherever it came from. Snug up the nipples a small amount the same amount on both sides and you can tell by how much thread is left.

When you are getting close start striking the spokes with the wrench. They should all ring out with a nice "Ping!". If you hear a dull "Pong" or "Thunk", then tighten some more. When they are close to the same sound, take a pencil hold it close to the rim and rotate the wheel and note where it leaves a mark. You will loosen spokes on that side and tighten spokes on the opposite. You will also check for up and down movement. Also the rim should have an equal distance on each side from the fork or the swingarm. Have fun! :thumbsup:

Tape off the spokes at their junction on the current wheel. Remove the spoke nipples and yes anti-seize is a great idea. Remove the old rim and lay the new one in it's place. Place the spokes in the correct holes in the new rim and start all of the nipples. Put the assembled wheel in either the forks or the swingarm, wherever it came from. Snug up the nipples a small amount the same amount on both sides and you can tell by how much thread is left.

When you are getting close start striking the spokes with the wrench. They should all ring out with a nice "Ping!". If you hear a dull "Pong" or "Thunk", then tighten some more. When they are close to the same sound, take a pencil hold it close to the rim and rotate the wheel and note where it leaves a mark. You will loosen spokes on that side and tighten spokes on the opposite. You will also check for up and down movement. Also the rim should have an equal distance on each side from the fork or the swingarm. Have fun! :thumbsup:

Well said. Hell, a cave man could do that.

SURFER-B, dude you helped me out a lot and I didn't even start this thread. I've been looking for that for months. Thanks.

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