Complete 2 Stroke Engine Tear Down: Gasket Maker?

This goes for all 2 stroke engines but the video happens to be a Blaster engine, what is the white stuff they are applying with the gaskets? Seems like they used it on the case split where it meets the bottom of the jug, but then again it was also used at the beginning on one area. Any idea what or why? Thanks :thumbsup:

It's three bond, yamabond, kawibond etc. There is no gasket were the case halfs come together so you use the above specified liquid gasket. It's used in other places as well. If I recall it was called for on the cylinder head cover of my 300 ex.

Thats a bad video to watch/learn from.

1/ He didn't torque is case half bolts

2/ He used an impact gun to reassemble his engine (closed the window as soon as that came up)

The white stuff that he uses is a liquid gasket material that the OEM calls for becuase the engine was desigened for it. In some case/uses it works better then your standard paper gasket, standing up to heat, vibration, flex and gas/oils better. It also has a lower fail rate with some uses, not to mention that it tends to be cheaper then regular paper gaskets. It also allows the mating serfaces to fit toghether with better, tighter tolerances.

You can find it at your local auto parts store if you happen to need some.

2/ He used an impact gun to reassemble his engine (closed the window as soon as that came up)

Whew, can you imagine what would have happened if you watched the whole thing? :thumbsup:

I hope my Clymer manual tells me where to use it on my lt250R, can I use Permatex maximum oil resistance RTV silicone (black)?

And I figured it was a bad idea using that impact, but what if the resistance is set low on the impact? Is it the jarring back and forth motion that is bad? I also noticed he did not even torque his clutch, I plan to make a 1080p HD time lapse of my 250R engine from 2 angles both HD one macro, one fisheye.

Thats a bad video to watch/learn from.

1/ He didn't torque is case half bolts

2/ He used an impact gun to reassemble his engine (closed the window as soon as that came up)

The white stuff that he uses is a liquid gasket material that the OEM calls for becuase the engine was desigened for it. In some case/uses it works better then your standard paper gasket, standing up to heat, vibration, flex and gas/oils better. It also has a lower fail rate with some uses, not to mention that it tends to be cheaper then regular paper gaskets. It also allows the mating serfaces to fit toghether with better, tighter tolerances.

You can find it at your local auto parts store if you happen to need some.

I totally agree! Maybe he has a "clicker" elbow. I never use a impact on any assembly on a bike, in fact I've never used one at all on a bike. Also I noticed that he used sealer on the cyl. base gasket which just might be more typical with older style engines, but not on anything I have worked on.

Also I noticed that he used sealer on the cyl. base gasket which just might be more typical with older style engines, but not on anything I have worked on.

I can't see why a small bead on the base gasket of all 2 strokes could hurt.

I hope my Clymer manual tells me where to use it on my lt250R, can I use Permatex maximum oil resistance RTV silicone (black)?

And I figured it was a bad idea using that impact, but what if the resistance is set low on the impact? Is it the jarring back and forth motion that is bad? I also noticed he did not even torque his clutch, I plan to make a 1080p HD time lapse of my 250R engine from 2 angles both HD one macro, one fisheye.

Yes the clymer will tell you were you need to use the sealer. No you shouldn't use permatex, any dealer will have yamabond, Hondabond, etc just ask what to use for assembling cases. Impact wrenches are handy tools for disassembly But should never be used to assemble a motor.

Yes the clymer will tell you were you need to use the sealer. No you shouldn't use permatex, any dealer will have yamabond, Hondabond, etc just ask what to use for assembling cases. Impact wrenches are handy tools for disassembly But should never be used to assemble a motor.

:thumbsup:

You can't use permatex, the gas will dissolve it.

Suzukibond, yamabond, hondabond, and threebond 1194 are all the same and the stuff to use.

harley dealers have the threebond cheap

guess those harleys leak a lot

I ordered a tube off Amazon of Threebond for $10.50 (plus $8 shipping :thumbsup: )

Oddly my Clymer does not tell me to use sealer anywhere on my quadracer. Yet my "complete engine gasket set" did not come with a tranny case split gasket. I will read it again but it seems to jump around a lot in the steps for disassembly, not very orderly.

What a hack.

  • The cases should be supported on blocks, not resting on the crank and trans shafts.
  • The mating surfaces should be wiped down with a clean cloth wet with a solvent (brake parts cleaner/electrical parts cleaner/benzine) and aloowed to dry - No touching with grubby fingers!!!
  • Threebond should be applied with a nozzle oy a popsicle stick - No grubby fingers!!!
  • No hammering of cases to assemble.

That is as far as I could stomach wacthing the hack work.

This why a bike with a 'fully rebuilt engine' is often a nightmare waiting to bite you in the butt. Thanks, now I'll have nightmares.

Threebond (Yamabond/Hondabond/suzukibond/Kawasakibond) only on cases. Clymer manuals are notoriously bad. I would never ever use one.

I don't see how a rubber mallet light tap can hurt, but what would you recommend I use to tell me where to apply threebond? A Suzuki manual or?

There is a tool used to pull the cases together.

A tiny bead (not smearing) of Threebond should go on all surgically clean mating surfaces. The bead of sealer should be about the diameter of a toothpick.

There is a tool used to pull the cases together.

A tiny bead (not smearing) of Threebond should go on all surgically clean mating surfaces. The bead of sealer should be about the diameter of a toothpick.

Sounds like a plan man, I get anal about the working surfaces when using any silicone/gasket maker/sealer, always clean as a whistle.

Does anyone use STP oil treatment during a rebuild? Like paint some on the wrist pin and crank shaft? We do it at work for snowblowers and mowers, stuff is extremely thick and gooey.

Nope, that was done fourty years ago. Not needed with todays manufacturing tolerences. Drop of engine oil is all it needs.

Nope, that was done fourty years ago. Not needed with todays manufacturing tolerences. Drop of engine oil is all it needs.

Even if the engine was from 1986? Would it benefit at all by applying some or not even worth it?

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