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Cheap Spark Plugs for 2-strokes?

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OK, this should be good for starting some arguments....

Do you spend guys really spend $6 to $12 for premium spark plugs for your 2-stroke?

I buy Autolite 4062 or 4063 at Advance Auto parts for $2. I install a new one just before every race (Hare Scrambles, where you have to run to bike and start it). I NEED that bike to start on the first kick. I have not had any problems, and bike runs great. Actually, it usually starts on first kick even if plug has been in there for a longer time.

My reasoning is that I'd rather have a NEW plug more oftern than a more expensive one that "lasts longer". I have seen many "racing" plugs get carbon fouled, and cleaning them doesn't work.

RockAuto dot com has them for $1.42 right now, with a $1 rebate (limit 16).

They are a good match for my $9 per gallon WalMart brand 2-stroke oil!

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I run standard NGK plugs. Roughly $3 each. They work great and last at least 6+ months. I'm sure they last a lot longer than that but I swap them out anyways. Oh, yeah, starts first kick every time as long as she has been warmed up before hand.

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Spark plug hype is 99.9999999999999999999% bs. I am on my second plug in my 01 CR. Proper jetting is the key. A plug is a plug is a plug is a plug is a .............................................

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You're wasting money changing it so often IMO. I can litterally go years with the same plug and I've never had one fail.

If saving $3 is important to you, get the NGK ES plugs.

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I have one of them iridium plugs in one of my bikes and I have not changed it in years. Starts first or second kick.

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How cheap do you want? I think $3 per is pretty cheap.

For what its worth I've always had the best luck running the brand and heat range recommended by the manufacture. As the previous poster said

Proper jetting is the key.
Also oil and ratio affect jetting.

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The Japanese manufacturers just recommended NGK because its Japanese... I run em anyway though since they aren't too expensive and the Japanese do usually make some pretty good products (even though wiki says they have two factories in the US that make plugs).

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My local shop sells NGK B8EG and B9EG plugs for $4. They resist fouling and last much longer than the cheaper B8ES and B9ES plugs.

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I can get my plugs at the local farm supply store for $1.99 or $1.49 when on sale. I have not fouled a plug since I bought my CR250 last year, but I do switch them out every 3rd ride and a new one for race day. I don't see why you would want to spend $10+ on a plug? I suppose if you are a pro and trying to produce every minute amount of HP from a bike?

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how often should you change your plug even if it is running good? I ran the same iridium plug in my KX250 all last suimmer and never had any issues. Should I put a fresh plug in it for this year?

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I don't change it unless I foul it (which only happened once in the last 10 years). I did it a few times "just in case" but didn't really notice any difference. Usually the plug that comes in the bike when I buy it is the plug that's in the bike when I sell it (usually keep them 2 years on average).

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I've been using the same B8ES for over three years. :thumbsup:

I have a ttr125 that I bought new for my kids in '01 and have never changed the plug.

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I used to use ngks, but they would always foul in my yz125, but my friend handed me a no frills champion copper and it never fouled again after that. They cost 2 bucks at an auto parts store.

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buy ngk iridiums, hands down the best, they would be BR9EIX, back in my 2 stroke days, when i popped that iridium in, from a copper plug, there was a difference, started better, power was cleaner, and how the powerband came on, it changed it all, and for the better.... less smoke, basically iridiums are the best plugs you can buy, they are VERY resistant to fouling, good for 150k + km's, and yeah, well worth it,

i run nothing but iridiums in everything because they are the best, and i dont say they are the best because they are the best, i say they are the best because of my personal results with more then 1 engine,

you can buy 2 for like 12$, you might say, thats a bit steep.... but thats alot better then paying 23$ for 1 back in the day....

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I use NGKs, got the last ones from Amazon, 4 for $5, free shipping.

One will run all season in my YZ. Probably longer but I usually stick a new one in it in the spring sometime.

Edited by OLHILLBILLY
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Comical thread

Comical because a fouled plug is still good, correct the jetting and it's a miracle!! it's good again :goofy:  

Comical because you just keep throwing good plugs away

The thing sparks, that's all it's job is, it sparks

They can last your friggin life time if your equipment is performing correctly 

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Man, I won't even use those cheap autolites in a crackheads car! They are crappy plugs to begin with, and the black oxide plating on the threads is too thin and wears off when you thread them in, so they wind up seizing in the head. When I see these plugs in certain industrial engines that I work on, I know I'm going to have a bad day. I only use NGK or Denso when I have a choice. The only exception is Chrysler engines, which only seem happy with champion plugs.

Also, modern automotive spark plugs no longer have the glazing to protect the porcelain insulator like they used to. Modern engines with EFi rarely foul plugs, so the manufacturers skip that step to save money. If you don't believe me, go find a NOS plug from the seventies and compare it to a modern equivalent. Most small engine plugs still have the glazing too, so they are another plug to check for a comparison.

Back on the subject of bikes. My old KTM ran best with an NGK gold plug, for whatever reason it starts easier with plug than with the standard OEM NGK, but I think in years and years of riding that bike the only plug it ever fouled was when it had a Reed valve failing.

I use standard NGKs for everything else, and don't find them expensive at all.

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