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Help learn to shift at the right time

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I know how to shift but i dont know when i shift down when it boggs and thats about it other that a drag i stay in 3rd gear. how do i learn to shift at the right time? i normally ride on a large motocross track or a small supercross track

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Lots of seat time. You'll get a feel for it as you ride more. Listen to the engine. Like everything else, practice will make you better. Also, 2 or 4 stroke?

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You just have to ride a lot. If on a smoker you want to rev it pretty high and downshift on corners or anytime you slow down to keep the revs up. On 4 strokes shift up a bit earlier and shift down when you bog.

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Really you have to listen to your engine. Your engine will tell you when it's time to shift, from the RPM's being high (shift up) or the RPM's bogging down too low (below idle- shift down).

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rm 85 but i am moving up to a ktm 250sxff

thats going to be night and day on two different planets haha and to answer your question seat time is the only thing that will make you better

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ya i know i rode it around our yard and dam it is torque and hard to start. (Its my dads bike but he is kinda done riding) so my dad starts the dam thing first kick

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Ive got a ktm 250sxf. Ha ha. Enjoy. Ride her hard....

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Not sure on your experience level but are you pulling the clutch in when you shift down? Using the clutch to downshift is not necessary and it brakes up the steadiness of braking with the help of the engine's back pressure. It's necessary to use the clutch when you up shift because the transmission has torque on the gears from the power of the engine. But there's very little torque on the gears when the throttle is off and you’re slowing down. Just a thought...

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^Some would argue that's it's never a necessity to use the clutch, and it's just a waste of weight.

Just use the clutch, learn how to properly shift. It's there for a reason, so use it. The clutch is also mandatory for engine braking as well, because you are subjecting the geartrain to sudden shock if you downshift while engine braking, whereas you generally ease into the gears if you slip the clutch. Similar to driving a car.

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^Some would argue that's it's never a necessity to use the clutch, and it's just a waste of weight.

Just use the clutch, learn how to properly shift. It's there for a reason, so use it. The clutch is also mandatory for engine braking as well, because you are subjecting the geartrain to sudden shock if you downshift while engine braking, whereas you generally ease into the gears if you slip the clutch. Similar to driving a car.

I never told him not to use his clutch ever, I told him not to use it while down shifting... Which is in Gary's "10 Absolute MX Practice Tips by Gary Semics". I use to have the same problem as the OP until I stopped using the clutch while down-shifting.

No offense, but I have never seen you make a near-accurate post on this forum... like when you told someone you hadn't changed your top end in 27 years and no one needed to if they took care of their bike. :confused:

Not trying to be a dick, but it would probably be wise to make sure you have your facts straight before telling someone they're wrong. It's also not very helpful to spread the wrong knowledge to people who are looking for help...

Just sayin. :thumbsup:

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ya i know i rode it around our yard and dam it is torque and hard to start. (Its my dads bike but he is kinda done riding) so my dad starts the dam thing first kick

Wait until you get a 450 with lots of compression. Or worse yet, a XR650R with a HC piston and a Hotcam (no auto-decomp). That can be a massive PITA to start.

^Some would argue that's it's never a necessity to use the clutch, and it's just a waste of weight.

Just use the clutch, learn how to properly shift. It's there for a reason, so use it. The clutch is also mandatory for engine braking as well, because you are subjecting the geartrain to sudden shock if you downshift while engine braking, whereas you generally ease into the gears if you slip the clutch. Similar to driving a car.

This makes no sense at all. You first statement totally contradicts your second one.

Engine braking, in simple terms, is the friction of the engine parts (piston, crank, ect.) slowing the bike down, like a brake. 2T have less EB that a 4T (less moving parts, less friction). The clutch has little to do with it. And bike trannies are designed with a dog system, way different than a car tranny.

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^Think about it, if you shift at the wrong time, then you're going to cause wear and tear on your gears that just simply won't make them last as long. If you use the clutch while downshifting and while engine braking, then you ease into the loads on the gears, rather than just smacking them. Tis better to use the clutch while engine braking, than it is to not use the clutch and shred your geartrain.

I syncro if I'm riding in a section where it's just not practical to pull the clutch, incase you were wondering.

BTW, read the first line in my post. Here, I'll quote it for you:

Some would argue that's it's never a necessity to use the clutch, and it's just a waste of weight.

Never did I say 'I am going to argue that you should never use the clutch.' :thumbsup:

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No offense, but I have never seen you make a near-accurate post on this forum... like when you told someone you hadn't changed your top end in 27 years and no one needed to if they took care of their bike. :thumbsup:

Not trying to be a dick, but it would probably be wise to make sure you have your facts straight before telling someone they're wrong. It's also not very helpful to spread the wrong knowledge to people who are looking for help...

I have the facts, mostly on old stuff, which often times translates to new stuff. My 2 stroke that is 27 years old runs and operates perfectly, and the piston and cylinder show no signs of wear. In the case of that, the engine was built better and made to last, unlike the POS stuff that dealers make nowadays. And I have the facts from plenty of other owners of the same exact bike who have similar hours on theirs, and they never have opened their engines.

BTW, I'm only in the bike section a little bit of the time, there's plenty of other posts for you to cry about :confused:

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BTW, I'm only in the bike section a little bit of the time, there's plenty of other posts for you to cry about :confused:

I'm not crying, just trying to make sure this kid gets the right facts. :thumbsup:

You try to back yourself up by repeating what you've already said, which is just as incorrect the 2nd time around. Gary's knowledge is unmistakable. His advice has made me a way better rider and I can personally back up his advice about not using the clutch to shift down. It was one of those "A-ha!" moments for me.

Your opinion is facing opposition from one of the most reputable sources on this site... If I were you I'd just let it go and stop digging yourself deeper.

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Your opinion is facing opposition from one of the most reputable sources on this site... If I were you I'd just let it go and stop digging yourself deeper.

Except with my last couple of posts I'm talking about engine braking, not down shifting to get into your engines powerband. Yet you seem keen on trying to make it fact that you should never use the clutch for downshifting.

Tis all in how you learn. I have learned to use the clutch. I try to set mine up as friction free as possible, so it only takes a finger to pull them :thumbsup:

I should also mention that a few pit bikes I have ridden just simply do not shift unless you pull the clutch, they have a locking system wth...

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Except with my last couple of posts I'm talking about engine braking, not down shifting to get into your engines powerband. Yet you seem keen on trying to make it fact that you should never use the clutch for downshifting.

Tis all in how you learn. I have learned to use the clutch. I try to set mine up as friction free as possible, so it only takes a finger to pull them :thumbsup:

I should also mention that a few pit bikes I have ridden just simply do not shift unless you pull the clutch, they have a locking system wth...

How do you do that?

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Lubricating the clutch cables, and pulling the outside of the lever. Lubricated vs non lubricated is almost a night and day feeling.

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what lubricant do you use? what about tri-flow and the perches are good but the bottom plastic mount on the radiator is cracked. is it still ok to ride as it just holds on the plastic.

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