Why shouldn't you do this?

Not sure I follow, but did he have that thing in gear on the stand?

In Neutral some bikes depending on adjustments (ie. clutch) the tire will still spin slowly if on the stand.

In Neutral some bikes depending on adjustments (ie. clutch) the tire will still spin slowly if on the stand.

Yeah, and I knew that too. It was not turning fast enough to be in time with the engine. Am I missing something what he did wrong if anything?

if the bike was cold, wouldnt it be a bad idea to rev it like that as soon as you start it?

if the bike was cold, wouldnt it be a bad idea to rev it like that as soon as you start it?

Very True

if the bike was cold, wouldnt it be a bad idea to rev it like that as soon as you start it?

Yeah, he revved it right off the first fire. Did not give the oil a chance to circulate and to warm up a bit. Good point.

if the bike was cold, wouldnt it be a bad idea to rev it like that as soon as you start it?

:confused::worthy::worthy::thumbsup::thumbsup:

Yeah, I was doing some Youtube browsing, and saw this and it made me cringe.

Not a good idea to 'wash' the dry cylinder with gas, or heat the piston and head up before the cylinder gets to temp. I'm sure a lot of people will disagree with me.

I was taught not to touch the throttle till the top of the radiators are hot. Just raise the idle screw, if needed, to keep the motor alive.

But when I see someone do this at the track, I have to wonder what he says in a month, when his bike burns oil, valves start cupping, and he 'rails' on 'cheap CRF motors'.

Ha!

Yeah, he revved it right off the first fire. Did not give the oil a chance to circulate and to warm up a bit. Good point.

The bike was running for 6 seconds (0:04 - 0:10) so the oil would have circulated. But nothing was up to temp yet. Especially since it looks chilly there with the wet ground and both dudes are wearing jackets.

Krannie is correct in his method of letting everything warm up before touching the throttle. I follow the same rule of no throttle til the rads get warm. Other riders sometimes go by the outside of the cyl or clutch cover.

The piston is right underneath the combustion and it has a lot less mass than the cylinder does and the cylinder has coolant running thru it. Therefore the piston is heating up and expanding very rapidly while the cylinder is not, thus causing a very tight fit. (cast pistons can handle that better than forged pistons can) ...and then he takes off and hammers it n puts the engine under a load right off bat. He is asking for a "cold seize" :thumbsup:

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