TE449 Rider Test

Thanks, good read.

- I wish they would have run it with the power up plug, even with the stock exhaust is runs WAY better and has much better power. It is a 2 second deal to do.

- I'm surprised they thought the gearing was wide and useful, i find it just barely wide enough for single track to freeway.

- I don't feel the CTS want to stand up at all in corners. I think it just takes a few times int he saddle to reprogram your cornering then it is all roses again.

- He says it will no pop the front end up. huh? Mine wheelies like a mad man and pops over log crossings like crazy. EZ to pop the front end up. Might have been because it was so lean from the plug not in it.

- Seemed to like the suspension which is VERY good for stock.

- great brakes, check

- awesome EFI check

- sweet motor, check

- smooth effortless clutch, check

- amazing CTS hookup, check

- Excellent ergos and light feel, check

- simple to get to air filter that never needs cleaned, check

- pipe burns holes, check :confused:

Great overall report and seems spot on. Go Cycle News!!! Once they power it up, spring it stiffer and get used to how it works they will be raving.

thanks for the post. :thumbsup:

One comment the author made that was interesting is that the bike tends to knife the front tire in deep sand at slow speeds. I could see this being an issue with the CTS since it doesn't squat and transfer weight to the rear as easily as a conventional bike.

Ride - have you had a chance to take your bike up a nice dry sandwash yet? Or do you even have sandwashes up there in the PNW?

We hit plenty of sand on the TXC. Works fine.

One comment the author made that was interesting is that the bike tends to knife the front tire in deep sand at slow speeds. I could see this being an issue with the CTS since it doesn't squat and transfer weight to the rear as easily as a conventional bike.

Ride - have you had a chance to take your bike up a nice dry sandwash yet? Or do you even have sandwashes up there in the PNW?

I would tend to agree with this comment. Ty and the boys seem to be making it work. Thats kinda out of my element as i ride mostly woods. I did take it to central Oregon Dez and it works GREAT there but i can see what they are saying. I notice this in snow as well.

Central Oregon silt i rode it in (I understand this is not deep sand wash stuff)

1245233712_zu39r-L.jpg

1245233759_JcoPE-L.jpg

vid of my buddy so you can see the conditions, bike worked GREAT in that stuff even with trials tires.

http://motosportz.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/4-7-11-Bend-ride/16538337_QKJGT#1245233790_t53M2-A-LB

Every bikes has idiosyncrasies, this one included but I mist say once again the amount of things they got right (lots) and the way the bike works is very good. I will trade the stability, surefootedness, awesome rear suspension performance and amazing traction for some knifing in sand which I'm sure can be tuned out to some extent. Everyone who has tried my bike praised the suspension, CTS and amazing traction. One guy flat said "that CTS is the next big thing" after getting off it.

The June issue of Dirt Bike has a test on the TXC511.

One comment the author made that was interesting is that the bike tends to knife the front tire in deep sand at slow speeds. I could see this being an issue with the CTS since it doesn't squat and transfer weight to the rear as easily as a conventional bike.

Ride - have you had a chance to take your bike up a nice dry sandwash yet? Or do you even have sandwashes up there in the PNW?

I agree with their assessment as well. The maiden voyage of my TE 449 included some pretty deep coal dirt (black sand). It took me a few minutes to get used to the different feel of this characteristic. I think a dampener would help solve this issue for my style of riding (old man putt putt). Not sure how more aggressive riders would feel about it.
The June issue of Dirt Bike has a test on the TXC511.

Just got mine in the mail. I'll have something to read on the plane tonight.

I just got done reading the Dirt Bike test. Overall I thought it was a pretty positive review. Two issues they said were the bike doesn't like the tight stuff and sputtering EFI. Not sure what's up with that? :thumbsup:

One thing I'm wondering is how much time these guys really spend evaluating these bikes before they put out a test. I used to think that they spent hours and hours and really knew the bike inside and out. The impression I get now is that they spend somewhat less than that and publish the tests before they get everything figured out. I'd rather wait another month and have them tell me how to fix these glitches.

Just my $0.02.

I just got done reading the Dirt Bike test. Overall I thought it was a pretty positive review. Two issues they said were the bike doesn't like the tight stuff and sputtering EFI. Not sure what's up with that? :thumbsup:

One thing I'm wondering is how much time these guys really spend evaluating these bikes before they put out a test. I used to think that they spent hours and hours and really knew the bike inside and out. The impression I get now is that they spend somewhat less than that and publish the tests before they get everything figured out. I'd rather wait another month and have them tell me how to fix these glitches.

Just my $0.02.

The bike just needed the power up plug installed ! I rode one and it never sputtered from lugging to redline ! The bike aslo felt super lite in the tight stuff. Do they really know what tight stuff is ? It is good to see some tests, to bad Scot Harden is not prepping the bikes for the tests, we probably wouldn't see stuff like that.

The bike just needed the power up plug installed ! I rode one and it never sputtered from lugging to redline !

Yep, EFI is perfect and the bike is great in the tight stuff, better than any 450 I have ridden in tight stuff, hell better then the majority of bikes period. The light feel, smooth motor and perfect EFI control make it great in the tight stuff.

Ask PNW Canada rider, Cory G how it works in tight/rocky stuff, he won the local Mexico,Tractor HS race in Tecate on his TXC449, anbd he had some good competition (Ivan Ramirez for one) in the pro class to contend with.

Thought test was okay,,,dont put much faith in a review that shows 2 pictures of TE instead of the TXC....nice editing.

I noticed that handling trait in the sand from new as well.After some time on the bike you do tend to adapt to it.

to bad Scot Harden is not prepping the bikes for the tests, we probably wouldn't see stuff like that.

Seriously, if they have to "prep it" to test it, it's not what you get delivered.

Granted, some things are intended to be done. On public lands in the USA, generally we need a spark arrestor. Husky's need the "power up", and with the new TXC/TE, the lighter weight muffler. Yamaha's need the throttle stop removed on the WR.

I would say that a magazine test would need a quick "here's how it's delivered" and "here's how it works after you do the really simple, obvious things that cost virtually no money or time".

Beyond that, it quickly becomes a modified bike, which is great, just not comparing the factory offering.

By the way, our new TXC-511 did have some popping also on it's first day of riding. Not really sure why, and it didn't happen all the time. I had it die on me once at low speed. It's great that these guys had the experience with the BMW engine previously, which they noted, didn't have these issues. Sounds like a simple software fix to me, maybe to counter the ills of EPA approval?

It never seemed to me that the bike felt heavy, as the article suggests. The suspension is pretty awesome, with some simple adjustments. It is NOT soft and squishy, like the TE.

I agree generally with, "We can't call it fast; it doesn't willingly rev and is slow to build momentum". Heck, probably even compared to its virtual twin, the Husky TC449, that statement is true. Compared to a bone stock Yamaha WR450, with the throttle stop... well, it probably will beat that !!

I went to the dealer to price out the mods to make our TXC a TC motor. OUCH !! Say goodbye to the familiar 8000A12345 Husky part numbers and relatively fair priced parts, and welcome to BMW part numbers and prices. The two cams, and new ECU would be about $1000. I didn't even bother to price the throttle body and piston.

The article ends with, "The bike works" and that it does. No question. I'll be anxious to see it actually compared to the KTM (whatever model that is, XC something?).

Tony,

I think he mean that it should have had the richer EFI plug in it. Thats all it really needed to run 100% and not stall. It has very lean EPA setting as it comes. The plug comes with the bike and takes 10 seconds to install with no tools so I would still say stock, just corrected from absurdly lean EPS settings.

As for "BMW" prices two cams and an ECU from anyone will be about that much. I have priced a lot of stuff for the 449/511 and found the prices quite reasonable surprisingly. Replacement plastic, rads, and stuff.

The weird thing about the bike not feeling fast but is. It hangs with a goof running KTM 530 EZ. But swapping between them you would swear the KTM is a lot faster. The cool thing is the husky does not wear on you. I rode many a TXC510 and those are brutal, this is not but still just as fast beteen the corners. It is an odd feeling. I think the super smooth motor / EFI and even power and quiet exhaust mask the sensation of power.

Good stuff. :thumbsup:

Having to alter an EPA and CARB certified emissions system/package for proper and safe operation should be unacceptable on a bike sold as road legal.

I know mods are required and common for as designed operation on many models from most all manufacturers, but these same manufactures also produce models which run great right off the showroom floor. Should we expect less?

If the trend continues I have no doubt there will be a crackdown with the stock vs "closed coarse only" settings being enforced. I hope you all are saving the OE parts and settings.

Bruce

I think he mean that it should have had the richer EFI plug in it. Thats all it really needed to run 100% and not stall.

Of course, our dealer, GP Motorcycles, did this mod, and the AK exhaust pipe before delivery. Still not 100% (very, very good though). Some folks complain about the Mikuni EFI on the 2010, but we've had ZERO problems with that. No stalling, no popping. Starts every time.

As for "BMW" prices two cams and an ECU from anyone will be about that much. I have priced a lot of stuff for the 449/511 and found the prices quite reasonable surprisingly. Replacement plastic, rads, and stuff.

Like all of us, we have a baseline of knowledge to compare against. Mine is having owned both a BMW motorcycle, and BMW car. Neither were cheap to operate. Parts prices were absurd, in my opinion. That means absurd compared to Chevy, Ford, Volkswagon, etc.

So, when I saw strange new part numbers formats, I immediately went into "oh, crap" mode. The parts you're talking about will, of course, carry the typical Husky 8000A12345 part numbers, and overall, I'm happy with the price of Husky parts. I know that Husky wasn't so good at making money, and I guarantee BMW knows how to do that.

Therefore, my fears, based on my previous baseline of knowledge, is that the BMW based parts (engine) will carry BMW price tags. I'm confident that I could buy the two cams and ECU for our 2010 "legacy" bike cheaper. It's easy to prove, I guess, one way or another.

One issue is that each camshaft is sold as an "assembly", and not individual camshafts only. But, you may be right. The prices may be similar.

The weird thing about the bike not feeling fast but is. It hangs with a goof running KTM 530 EZ. ...I rode many a TXC510 and those are brutal,

I think I prefer more "brutal" :thumbsup: Hopefully, I'll get a chance to ride a TC449 and see if it's worth the effort.

I promise that I'll do a drag race between the 2011 and both of our legacy bikes. Prediction; 2011 loses. Since we already know the legacy 510 bikes can outrun a KTM 530, all that tells me is that I prefer the Husky power!

Seriously, if they have to "prep it" to test it, it's not what you get delivered.

Granted, some things are intended to be done. On public lands in the USA, generally we need a spark arrestor. Husky's need the "power up", and with the new TXC/TE, the lighter weight muffler. Yamaha's need the throttle stop removed on the WR.

I would say that a magazine test would need a quick "here's how it's delivered" and "here's how it works after you do the really simple, obvious things that cost virtually no money or time".

Beyond that, it quickly becomes a modified bike, which is great, just not comparing the factory offering.

By the way, our new TXC-511 did have some popping also on it's first day of riding. Not really sure why, and it didn't happen all the time. I had it die on me once at low speed. It's great that these guys had the experience with the BMW engine previously, which they noted, didn't have these issues. Sounds like a simple software fix to me, maybe to counter the ills of EPA approval?

It never seemed to me that the bike felt heavy, as the article suggests. The suspension is pretty awesome, with some simple adjustments. It is NOT soft and squishy, like the TE.

I agree generally with, "We can't call it fast; it doesn't willingly rev and is slow to build momentum". Heck, probably even compared to its virtual twin, the Husky TC449, that statement is true. Compared to a bone stock Yamaha WR450, with the throttle stop... well, it probably will beat that !!

I went to the dealer to price out the mods to make our TXC a TC motor. OUCH !! Say goodbye to the familiar 8000A12345 Husky part numbers and relatively fair priced parts, and welcome to BMW part numbers and prices. The two cams, and new ECU would be about $1000. I didn't even bother to price the throttle body and piston.

The article ends with, "The bike works" and that it does. No question. I'll be anxious to see it actually compared to the KTM (whatever model that is, XC something?).

Do you really think honda, ktm, etc... send unprepped bikes ????

Do you really think honda, ktm, etc... send unprepped bikes ????

Heck, Yamaha makes it a party for the press. I think Husky did try that up in the high desert of Southern California, many months ago.

Yes, Yamaha certainly hands them a fully ready, but stock, bike.

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