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How to push it harder in the turns/corners "Sand"

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I haven't fallen in a turn/corner in a while I feel like im on this plateau where i won't push it harder. What do you guys do to really push you and the bike in the turns? what techniques do you use to blast through the corner rather than eat dirt? Do you guys just balls it out and hammer down or take it slow? I really wanna start getting faster on the turns! :thumbsup:

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I'm at the same place. I keep getting left behind in the corners. I feel like i'm getting faster, but i'm not sure if i'm getting the technique down. I feel like i'm physicly pushing the bars towards the ground, and it seems to help. I need some expert advice.

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I try to practice figure of 8's on varied terrain concentrating on peg weighting and keeping my elbows up. I still suck and am slow as molasses but I'm getting better at it. Once a little berm gets worn in it's easier.

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In my experience there comes a point where you won't get any faster unless you are either coached or ride with people who are faster than you.

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I'm at the same place. I keep getting left behind in the corners. I feel like i'm getting faster, but i'm not sure if i'm getting the technique down. I feel like i'm physicly pushing the bars towards the ground, and it seems to help. I need some expert advice.

I am not an expert at sand (or anywher else), but look a this thread, it may give you some ideas. It seems you are coutner-steering.

http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=980072

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I love the sand. Dunes, sand whoops, sandy trails, all of it. To go faster in the sand lower your air pressure, 8 front and 6 in the rear, that alone will help a lot. Come into the corner, a gear high, no front break and an even throttle. Riding position, you have to be back in the seat. Riding on the tank, like you would on hard pack, will bury your front tire causing you to knife in and loose rear wheel traction at the same time. Lean the bike over and put the edge of the seat in the crack of your ass and get on the gas, hard. Be ready to lean way back and get the front end up to get over the whoops. When you hit it, it is so much fun!

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I haven't fallen in a turn/corner in a while I feel like im on this plateau where i won't push it harder. What do you guys do to really push you and the bike in the turns? what techniques do you use to blast through the corner rather than eat dirt? Do you guys just balls it out and hammer down or take it slow? I really wanna start getting faster on the turns! :smirk:

Cornering in sand is different than cornering in hardpack. In hardpack terrain you may still be on the front brake in the early part of the turn, before transitioning to throttle. In sand you generally want to finish braking before you start the turn, and stay on the gas all the way through the turn. If you chop the throttle while turning in sand, the front end will usually wash out.

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Personally, I do the above on sweepers or bermed sweepers. Lately, I've been trying to pick up speed on my 125 on sharper bermed corners since I felt I wasn't as good at them. I use to brake slide into the corners a lot. Now I've found I'm much faster by simply not slowing down much at all and letting off the throttle to just the cracked open position just before the corner starts. The extra momentum I have from not braking carries me right around the berm. I then get back on the throttle after apex. I ride a 125 though so I'd assume a 4 stroke would act differently.

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In my experience there comes a point where you won't get any faster unless you are either coached or ride with people who are faster than you.

+1 :smirk:

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I have lots of experience screwing up turns. Every now and then, I get it right. When I do, here's how I execute.

1. Do not look at the ground or the front fender. Its not going anywhere, no need to stare at it. Instead, look ahead at the line you will be taking when exiting the turn. Start looking for the exit of the turn before you start turning. Turn your head and neck and face the exit.

2, setup early, start your lean a bit early if you can, finish your breaking and get the butt crack on the edge of the seat. Outside elbow up high.

3. turn the bike while still looking ahead, not down. Be on the gas a bit and carry momentum. Be smooth and hold your speed til you are squared up. Don't let the bike slow down. Do not be on the brakes while turning.

good luck

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Do not be on the brakes while turning.

unless it's faster and safer, which it often is in non-sandy situations, especially in tight turns. gentle and increasing front brake pressure can be held just about up to the apex of the corner where you transition to full throttle. This weights the front end more for better traction, and also compresses forks, steepening the steering angle for quicker turn-in.

:smirk:

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unless it's faster and safer, which it often is in non-sandy situations, especially in tight turns. gentle and increasing front brake pressure can be held just about up to the apex of the corner where you transition to full throttle. This weights the front end more for better traction, and also compresses forks, steepening the steering angle for quicker turn-in.

:smirk:

That would require some tricky timing. Correct me if I am wrong, but what we'd really be doing in this case is attempting to use the brakes to set the proper turning speed... given the situation of course.

When I square up turns by braking late, I find it difficult to hold the correct speed, unless I come in really hot.

boy... this is so much easieer to talk about than it is to execute.

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That would require some tricky timing. Correct me if I am wrong, but what we'd really be doing in this case is attempting to use the brakes to set the proper turning speed... given the situation of course.

When I square up turns by braking late, I find it difficult to hold the correct speed, unless I come in really hot.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trail_braking

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That would require some tricky timing. Correct me if I am wrong, but what we'd really be doing in this case is attempting to use the brakes to set the proper turning speed... given the situation of course.

well, it requires practice, if that's what you mean. i work on it in the parking lot sometimes just doing elongated figure 8's.

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My practice track is sand, and what has helped me the most is standing (in a crouch) until the middle of the corner, then sitting and gassing it at the same time. I can enter faster AND exit faster this way.

I used to try to roll on the gas at the beginning of the berm like others have suggested, but that requires you to slow way earlier and sometimes I have to roll out of it if the front end bobbles. With the stand in/sit out technique, you can use the berm itself to slow you at the mid point and there seems to be NO risk of losing the front.

Try it.

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Trying to brake slide into soft sand doesn't work well. Tends to stand the bike up. Brake earlier than on hard pack. It may not be proper techinque but you can scrub off an amazing amount of speed by intentially scrubbing the front tire on entrance. You can't be to far up on the seat or it's hard to control.

Be on the throttle as soon as you start to lay the bike over and increase at least by mid corner. If the front starts to tuck add throttle to counter. Body postion is more mid than up on the seat. If you slow too much you'll fight the bikes wallow and tend to stand the bike up to stabilize. Faster or rough corners i usually stand. Balls of your foot, butt back and hunched way over. The the very back of the seat should tap your butt over the bumps.

Easy to say but harder to do- commitment is the key. You are forcing the bike to push deep in the sand and create its own berm as you go. I'm not an expert but have worked hard at learning how but blow it regularly.

If your on a fourstroke and having trouble tucking the front try turning the idle way up. If you're riding trail not track do not run 6-8 pounds of air mentioned above. The exposed pine and oak roots we have here in Fl will give you instant flats and likely ruin a rim.

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i totally disagree with people saying dont be up on the seat.

all i ride is sand in florida. if its a deep sand berm, and you wanna get better at them, break BEFORE, not when u enter it and get half way then get on the gas. get on the gas before your actually in the berm, get up on the seat lay it down hold it open and fan the clutch. your front end wont sink as long as you keep on the gas.

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do everything you can to weight that outside peg. keep enough forward bias to keep from washing, but still maintain traction. try to pick up speed from the apex out. I would suggest finding a nice loamy corner where you will not get too beat up if you go down and keep pushing it till you do. you may be surprised how much you can get away with.

traction momentum and focus are what you need to improve. you may need to make a couple suspension tweaks to get it all to come together.

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i totally disagree with people saying dont be up on the seat.

all i ride is sand in florida. if its a deep sand berm, and you wanna get better at them, break BEFORE, not when u enter it and get half way then get on the gas. get on the gas before your actually in the berm, get up on the seat lay it down hold it open and fan the clutch. your front end wont sink as long as you keep on the gas.

I agree with what you say. I also only ride single track whooped sand, and I have to get forward on the seat otherwise I go over the bars.

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