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Replaced Handlebars Today - Extra Wire Mystery?

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I installed some new bars today. When I put everything back together, I ended up with an extra hanging wire (see picture link below). One wire is red and black and the other is just black. Both wires end with a female plug.

There is only one male male plug attached to the front brake lever assembly. Which hanging female plug should I attach to the front brake? What does the other wire do?

Any help would be appreciated.

Picture:

1plug2cablesMystery.jpg

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I installed some new bars today. When I put everything back together, I ended up with an extra hanging wire (see picture link below). One wire is red and black and the other is just black. Both wires end with a female plug.

There is only one male male plug attached to the front brake lever assembly. Which hanging female plug should I attach to the front brake? What does the other wire do?

There should be 2 male bits on the brakes.

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Look closer at the top arrow in your pic, there are 2 male terminals.

Hard to see on the bike but there are indeed two male terminals on the brake microswitch. The picture you posted shows this more clearly. The two terminals are side by side. So what handlebars did you install?

Tech23

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Thank you for for the feedback guys. Very helpful. As you can tell, I am not mechanically inclined (but trying to learn). My next goal is to actually learn to fix a flat in the field with tools carried on the bike.

The new bars are from Moose Racing. I liked the Renthals better but the hole at the end of the Renthal bars was smaller and did not fit the hand guards I already had.

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Thank you for for the feedback guys. Very helpful. As you can tell, I am not mechanically inclined (but trying to learn). My next goal is to actually learn to fix a flat in the field with tools carried on the bike.
I've changed my own tires for 25 years, just to be fresh if it happens on the ride (three times). I use the tools I carry; two 15" and a 10". When younger I used the 10", they've since come out with the 15" and it helps; not much harder to carry, tape them together so they don't rattle. I carry both tubes, I've tried patching on the trail; it sucks.

I replaced both tires Saturday, don't usually do both, but this time they were worn out together. Learn how to do this at home, it's easy to watch a video done by an expert with a tire stand, but really hard on the garage floor (my knees hurt from squishing down the knobby into the spoke hollow), and even harder on the trail. The one 'cheat' I use at home is a squirt bottle of soapy water, this is REALLY helpful when learning. On the trail, I use the diet coke I'm carrying; no sticky sugar (someone suggested the small hotel shampoo bottles). If you ride alone, you'll need to figure out how to break the bead on the rear tire. I use all three tools, two of them 'playing off one another, lube (it wicks in as you struggle). If you ride with someone, use their kickstand on your sidewall; with the weight of their bike. Tip: check your rear rim for a raised ridge, it traps the tire against the bead. Some guys remove the ridge for 8 or 10" so it will part from the bead. Problem is; you have to remember where that level spot is

Saturday: it was hard and I was tired. Learn how to do this at home.

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