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Yz250f for 215lb rider

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Looking at yz250f(s). Before i go looking at some eventually i was curious if i'm gonna have to worry about the rear shock for my weight. I rode my cousins honda crf230 this weekend and it felt good, so i figured a 250 would be the same suspension wise. TIA

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You will have to change the rear spring to about a 5.6kg and the fork springs to .46 or .48 depending if its mx or offroad you are doing(your sag numbers front and rear will tell you if they are right), and you may have to get the damping stiffened up to

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I have an '07 YZ250f and weigh 230lbs without gear. I got a 5.6kg rear spring and 0.48 fork springs (still waiting for the shipment). I got my springs at race-tech, and after riding this weekend WOW what an improvement. Setting the race sag on the rear shock was a pain in the ass process (2-3hrs of fine tuning).

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You will need to re-tune the suspension in order to really enjoy the bike. I took my bike in to my local pro shop and they said the stock setup ('06 YZ) was only good up to 175lbs. I have ridden a bike set up for my weight and riding environment and it makes such a bike difference in handling and no more fighting the bike tooth and nail to get it to do what you want.

You won't die without the suspension setup... But you haven't lived till you've had it.

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How much would the full setup be? I'm just thinking of getting maybe around an 02/03 yz250f so...i dont want to spend 2 grand on the bike then drop 500 bucks into it you know. It'll be my first dirt bike so i want to get slowly into it

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Fork springs can be had for around $100 - $115 for a set and about the same for the rear spring. So you'll be at least a couple hundred bucks for parts, unless you happen to find a steal on a used spring on ebay. You can change out the rear spring quite simply (and if you had to pick shock spring or fork springs, I would recommend shock spring first). The front fork springs, well you might as well count on changing the oil in the forks when you change the springs.

A big part of it will depend on how you ride though really. If you are Christophe Pourcell and stand 95% of the time you are riding it won't matter as much as it will if you are a typical weekend warrior who likes to sit for everything but braking bumps and jumps, lol.

My suggestion for pragmatism is to

A). Tell the seller you're going to have to change the suspension for your weight so you really need to spend a couple hundred less than he is asking :smirk:

:smirk:. Change the rear spring out immediately. It might actually kill you (or seriously hurt you) because I see a lot of "sitters" that don't have their rear setup correctly do the "boingo" and have the rear of their bikes constantly bottom out and then rebound wildly ejecting them like a Texas bull.

C.) $2k is too much to pay for an 03 yz250f. The dealer retail blue book value is only $1995. A good rule of thumb I like to go by when purchasing used bikes (at least as a starting point) is to take the blue book retail and the blue book trade in value and find the middle. In this case, the trade in value for an 03' is around $1300. So $1600 for a well maintained 03' might be a good deal. Beware that consumable parts can add up quickly on a used bike though and use that info to bargain down your price. Chain, sprockets, rub block, slider, wheel bearings, rotors, brakes and linkage bearings can easily set you back $500 and the majority of used bikes need at least some of those items.

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Fork springs can be had for around $100 - $115 for a set and about the same for the rear spring. So you'll be at least a couple hundred bucks for parts, unless you happen to find a steal on a used spring on ebay. You can change out the rear spring quite simply (and if you had to pick shock spring or fork springs, I would recommend shock spring first). The front fork springs, well you might as well count on changing the oil in the forks when you change the springs.

A big part of it will depend on how you ride though really. If you are Christophe Pourcell and stand 95% of the time you are riding it won't matter as much as it will if you are a typical weekend warrior who likes to sit for everything but braking bumps and jumps, lol.

My suggestion for pragmatism is to

A). Tell the seller you're going to have to change the suspension for your weight so you really need to spend a couple hundred less than he is asking :smirk:

:smirk:. Change the rear spring out immediately. It might actually kill you (or seriously hurt you) because I see a lot of "sitters" that don't have their rear setup correctly do the "boingo" and have the rear of their bikes constantly bottom out and then rebound wildly ejecting them like a Texas bull.

C.) $2k is too much to pay for an 03 yz250f. The dealer retail blue book value is only $1995. A good rule of thumb I like to go by when purchasing used bikes (at least as a starting point) is to take the blue book retail and the blue book trade in value and find the middle. In this case, the trade in value for an 03' is around $1300. So $1600 for a well maintained 03' might be a good deal. Beware that consumable parts can add up quickly on a used bike though and use that info to bargain down your price. Chain, sprockets, rub block, slider, wheel bearings, rotors, brakes and linkage bearings can easily set you back $500 and the majority of used bikes need at least some of those items.

Thanks for the tips. You seem to know pretty well what your talking about heh. Is there anything bad for certain years of the yamaha 250s ?

I figure I'll ask and Search before starting a new thread

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Personally I never liked the steel frame Yamaha's, but to get into a model year that has an aluminum frame I think you are going to be beyond your price range. The best overall advice I can give you if you are just getting started is to learn to work on your bike yourself.

When I first got back into riding I had a hectic schedule and figured I would just pay someone to do my work. After paying $1300 for suspension and dropping loads of cash on other small parts I found out the suspension work was so shoddy that it nearly killed me. I decided then for my own safety that I would learn to do everything myself. I've ended up saving a bunch of money along the way and become a better rider because I have a much better understanding of how things work. Most significantly, I've found that I enjoy working on my bikes almost as much as I like riding them :smirk:

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