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Why Tread Lightly!...?

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Treading Lightly is one of the best practices that we as public land users can do to make sure that we can not only continue to use our public lands in a variety of recreational manners, but also make sure that the natural resources and experiences remain intact for future generations. Its not about restriction, but rather about responsibility for our public lands and to ourselves, our friends and families, other visitors, and future generations.

So what does it mean to "Tread Lightly"? Well, we've developed our 5 Principles to break it down to basics:

Tread Lightly! Principles

Travel Responsibly on land by staying on designated roads, trails and areas. Go over, not around, obstacles to avoid widening the trails. Cross streams only at designated crossings. When possible avoid wet, muddy trails. On water, stay on designated waterways and launch your watercraft in designated areas.

Respect the Rights of Others including private property owners, all recreational trail users, campers and others so they can enjoy their recreational activities undisturbed. Leave gates as you found them. Yield right of way to those passing you or going uphill. On water, respect anglers, swimmers, skiers, boaters, divers and those on or near shore.

Educate Yourself prior to your trip by obtaining travel maps and regulations from public agencies. Plan for your trip, take recreation skills classes and know how to operate your equipment safely.

Avoid Sensitive Areas on land such as meadows, lakeshores, wetlands and streams. Stay on designated routes. This protects wildlife habitats and sensitive soils from damage. Don’t disturb historical, archeological or paleontological sites. On water, avoid operating your watercraft in shallow waters or near shorelines at high speeds.

Do Your Part by modeling appropriate behavior, leaving the area better than you found it, properly disposing of waste, minimizing the use of fire, avoiding the spread of invasive species and repairing degraded areas.

We gain a lot by Treading Lightly as a community. Please help us by promoting the Tread Lightly! ethics whenever you can. :smirk:

For more information: www.treadlightly.org

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Also, you can follow us with social media!

Facebook: www.facebook.com/TLoutdoorethics

Twitter: twitter.com/#!/tread_lightly

Myspace: www.myspace.com/treadlightlypage

Thanks for the support!! And please, feel free to ask here if you have any questions or desire for clarification, at all.

Edited by Tread Lightly

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Tip of the week:

With many areas in western states still receiving snow (the year of the endless winter?) and high snowpack levels throughout, it is important to take a few things into consideration before heading out.

1) Check with local land managers to see if seasonal opening dates on gated trails have been extended.

2) Minimize use of extremely wet trails to avoid the creation of ruts.

3) Go through patches of snow, not around.

4) Be prepared in case the weather changes on you. Think warm clothing, water, food, and gear to spend the night if things get real bad.

Most of all... have fun and be safe out there!

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Im almost 50 years old now and this is what Ive seen:

Land closures...Period.

It doesn't matter how lightly you tread. It doesn't matter how quiet your bike is. It doesn't matter how responsible you are or act with regard to environment or others.

Its the act of going out and enjoying yourself that the "Eco-Greenies" want to stop. It was only a couple years ago that land in Utah was closed to hikers and horseback riding. How much land degradation is done on horseback or on foot? And the last time I looked horses aren't all that noisy.

You're fighting a Holy war. Their God is the planet. You are Satan because you enjoy the planet. If you cant see that you're either one of them or blind.

I am not against anyone treading lightly. I'm just saying that trying to appease the common foe here is pointless.

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Im almost 50 years old now and this is what Ive seen:

Land closures...Period.

It doesn't matter how lightly you tread. It doesn't matter how quiet your bike is. It doesn't matter how responsible you are or act with regard to environment or others.

Its the act of going out and enjoying yourself that the "Eco-Greenies" want to stop. It was only a couple years ago that land in Utah was closed to hikers and horseback riding. How much land degradation is done on horseback or on foot? And the last time I looked horses aren't all that noisy.

You're fighting a Holy war. Their God is the planet. You are Satan because you enjoy the planet. If you cant see that you're either one of them or blind.

I am not against anyone treading lightly. I'm just saying that trying to appease the common foe here is pointless.

Well-put, and reflects my feelings, too. :smirk:

In my opinion, "tread lightly" means to use your God-given common sense, not to feel guilty about disturbing a patch of sand, to be made-out like a criminal for crossing a stream, or to feel like you're raping somebody for riding a dirt bike in the first place.

I believe the whole reason for this bullshit lie environMENTAL movement is to ultimately remove everyone from land use, no matter if you're on a dirt bike or on foot, and eventually put control of this land into the hands of a select few.

Won't happen over night, but they're well on their way, using this enviro-crap as their excuse to make it that way.

That's basically been my feeling on the subject since I was first told I was doing a great harm by just riding a dirt bike in a local gravel pit when I was a teenager:

It makes no sense to me, unless there's a hidden motive behind the whole thing.

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I believe the whole reason for this bullshit lie environMENTAL movement is to ultimately remove everyone from land use, no matter if you're on a dirt bike or on foot, and eventually put control of this land into the hands of a select few.

It makes no sense to me, unless there's a hidden motive behind the whole thing.

Before I say anything... what I'm about to say is all opinion from a 16 year old kid who doesn't know anything about how the world works: :smirk:

I believe it's for power. It's secretly fascism (hence the term eco-fascism). It's to control our lives and how we live... the majority of people don't even see this happening.

"Going Green" gives reasons for heavy regulation and people support it because they are told they're "saving the planet". Regulation, taxes, tariffs... all bring in money... that's why green technology is being promoted (I have nothing against clean technology, I'm all for it but you need to be realistic).

I wonder if every rider was respectful, nice and treaded lightly, they would close trails?...

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I wonder if every rider was respectful, nice and treaded lightly, they would close trails?...

I think so, because that's the objective:

Get off the land and stay off.

Environmental reasons (lies) for this are just the excuses used to bring it about.

We've gotten to the point where you can be given a ticket for riding your own dirt bike on your own property.

What's next?

Well, to abolish riding a dirt bike at all, of course.

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Im almost 50 years old now and this is what Ive seen:

Land closures...Period.

It doesn't matter how lightly you tread. It doesn't matter how quiet your bike is. It doesn't matter how responsible you are or act with regard to environment or others.

Its the act of going out and enjoying yourself that the "Eco-Greenies" want to stop. It was only a couple years ago that land in Utah was closed to hikers and horseback riding. How much land degradation is done on horseback or on foot? And the last time I looked horses aren't all that noisy.

You're fighting a Holy war. Their God is the planet. You are Satan because you enjoy the planet. If you cant see that you're either one of them or blind.

I am not against anyone treading lightly. I'm just saying that trying to appease the common foe here is pointless.

This is precisely why we will continue to lose ground. Having TT mod come

on here with this Tude. Its apparent that some here make a living supply

parts and accessories to this industry, Seems to me your shooting your self

in the foot.

There are a few of us who have spent years and I personally lost tens

of thousands of dollars away from my own shop fighting for land access rights

so you can still ride in California. There have been success stories, But I wont

bore you with them

I have given up, not because the antis have the upper hand in some case

but rather some in the community have taken the low road and do what

ever the F they want perpetuating our ever losing battle by claiming common

sense is pointless.

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This is precisely why we will continue to lose ground. Having TT mod come

on here with this Tude. Its apparent that some here make a living supply

parts and accessories to this industry, Seems to me your shooting your self

in the foot.

There are a few of us who have spent years and I personally lost tens

of thousands of dollars away from my own shop fighting for land access rights

so you can still ride in California. There have been success stories, But I wont

bore you with them

I have given up, not because the antis have the upper hand in some case

but rather some in the community have taken the low road and do what

ever the F they want perpetuating our ever losing battle by claiming common

sense is pointless.

I have just this week come full circle understanding that many of the riding community do not want success stories. As long as people can blame everything on tree huggers and convince others that new trail opportunities do NOT exist, then they don't have to DO ANYTHING to help... and they then claim the moral right to ride user created trails, legal or not.

Even further, Outlaw riders HATE success stories because they assume new legal trails might be made of their illegal trails and then they would have to share them.

The only thing that seems ABSOLUTE is that we as a community have some huge conflicts internally that really impacts us coming together to get new trails added to the legal system.

The negative, complacent and selfish are more proactive than I had expected. I thought they would ignore those of us trying to get new trails opened up. But in fact, they actually rally against us in the shadows. It's the freakiest thing I have ever seen in the last 20 years in the riding community.

I've stayed out of the outlaw riding debate. I just wanna get some existing user trails that we've ridden for decades added to the legal system. But having outlaws lobbying against adding more legal trails blows me away. I don't even know what to make of it. :smirk:

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I have just this week come full circle understanding that many of the riding community do not want success stories. As long as people can blame everything on tree huggers and convince others that new trail opportunities do NOT exist, then they don't have to DO ANYTHING to help... and they then claim the moral right to ride user created trails, legal or not.

Even further, Outlaw riders HATE success stories because they assume new legal trails might be made of their illegal trails and then they would have to share them.

The only thing that seems ABSOLUTE is that we as a community have some huge conflicts internally that really impacts us coming together to get new trails added to the legal system.

The negative, complacent and selfish are more proactive than I had expected. I thought they would ignore those of us trying to get new trails opened up. But in fact, they actually rally against us in the shadows. It's the freakiest thing I have ever seen in the last 20 years in the riding community.

I've stayed out of the outlaw riding debate. I just wanna get some existing user trails that we've ridden for decades added to the legal system. But having outlaws lobbying against adding more legal trails blows me away. I don't even know what to make of it. :smirk:

I spent decades getting specific trails designated as open to motorized use, only to see them destroyed by careless riders once they were designated as open to motorized. Those riders would never have taken the time to find those trails had they not peen publicised.

I am now an outlaw rider. I ride largely abondoned trails, or cross country routes, that I and my fellow riders maintain ourselves. We are very selective about who we show these trails to. We leave very little trace of our use, and conflicts are very rare since we rarely encounter anyone on these trails.

I would say that eliminating users who do not Tread Lightly is vital to our sport, although I don't know how to do it. I'm afraid I've given up trying.

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I know I will get blasted for suggesting this. But here it goes.

I see the yahoo factor all the time , but I try to ride in areas that it is minimal. I avoid the OHV areas if possible because of the amount of riders and the ones that are there are in some conditions , just dangerous to be around. Fine they can have the OHV designated areas ,no problem. Lots of LE are there and ambulances are ready to go.

Maybe a system of Permits or Licensing needs to be established to allow ANY activity in the more wild areas or USFS/BLM areas where it is determined to be "sensitive". I mean ALL users need to get this. Lot's of hikers , rock climbers, MTB, Equestrians, Snowmobilers,XC skiers, name it. If you use the backcountry you should need to be trained in the minimal amount necessary to minimize your impact and need for emergency rescue and management of public lands while using these areas.

Fee to play would be not be needed as the fees would be up front to get the license/permit. Besides collection of user fees is easily usurped by the crafty folks who desire to avoid these fees. If they are found using these areas there would be severe penalties. Events would still be possible under the guidance or management of the organizers of the event.

You would need to be instructed on treading lightly, survival techniques, map reading ,navigation, enviro issues, rescue, etc. to prove your competence to be allowed into the backcountry.

In return for this the OHV community cuts a deal with Anti-access and Land Managers to allow for virtually unlimited access into backcountry with few if any restrictions.

I know this is a bit far fetched. But may be the only way to deal with the idiot quotient that is higher than you would hope in our sport.

I know this smacks of elitism a bit and in some ways runs counter to things like liberty and the meaning of public property. I didn"t arive at this idea lightly.

But the user population of these areas and the constant conflicts needs a bold out of the box solution that reduces State/Fed costs to manage and creates greater responsibility and stewardship of the land and enhances personal responsibility while out there enjoying it for all parties and groups.

Edited by Chasejj

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I spent decades getting specific trails designated as open to motorized use, only to see them destroyed by careless riders once they were designated as open to motorized. Those riders would never have taken the time to find those trails had they not peen publicised.

I am now an outlaw rider. I ride largely abondoned trails, or cross country routes, that I and my fellow riders maintain ourselves. We are very selective about who we show these trails to. We leave very little trace of our use, and conflicts are very rare since we rarely encounter anyone on these trails.

I would say that eliminating users who do not Tread Lightly is vital to our sport, although I don't know how to do it. I'm afraid I've given up trying.

Two opportunities exist:

1) Dirt Bike Only Trails eliminates 80% of the yahoo factor. We have made great progress getting local managers to understand dirt bikers need non atv trails to eliminate conflicts and increase safety and to be FAIR !

2) Outlaws should work with guys like me to help direct our successes onto safe and sane loops that have no impact on Outlaws and their trails. Then your risks are your own to live with and we have zero impact on each other. But the blanket lobbying against any new legal trails within our community is silly and just makes Outlaws look totally selfish.

Our people don't build fences in the forest. In fact, we refuse to. We try to bridge the gap between our local group of Forest Managers and legal users that want fair access to public land. The masses don't want to ride outlaw trails anyway because many are above their head. But mostly they just prefer to enjoy the ride instead of looking over their shoulder. :smirk:

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I know I will get blasted for suggesting this. But here it goes.

I see the yahoo factor all the time , but I try to ride in areas that it is minimal. I avoid the OHV areas if possible because of the amount of riders and the ones that are there are in some conditions , just dangerous to be around. Fine they can have the OHV designated areas ,no problem. Lots of LE are there and ambulances are ready to go.

Maybe a system of Permits or Licensing needs to be established to allow ANY activity in the more wild areas or USFS/BLM areas where it is determined to be "sensitive". I mean ALL users need to get this. Lot's of hikers , rock climbers, MTB, Equestrians, Snowmobilers,XC skiers, name it. If you use the backcountry you should need to be trained in the minimal amount necessary to minimize your impact and need for emergency rescue and management of public lands while using these areas.

Fee to play would be not be needed as the fees would be up front to get the license/permit. Besides collection of user fees is easily usurped by the crafty folks who desire to avoid these fees. If they are found using these areas there would be severe penalties. Events would still be possible under the guidance or management of the organizers of the event.

You would need to be instructed on treading lightly, survival techniques, map reading ,navigation, enviro issues, rescue, etc. to prove your competence to be allowed into the backcountry.

In return for this the OHV community cuts a deal with Anti-access and Land Managers to allow for virtually unlimited access into backcountry with few if any restrictions.

I know this is a bit far fetched. But may be the only way to deal with the idiot quotient that is higher than you would hope in our sport.

I know this smacks of elitism a bit and in some ways runs counter to things like liberty and the meaning of public property. I didn"t arive at this idea lightly.

But the user population of these areas and the constant conflicts needs a bold out of the box solution that reduces State/Fed costs to manage and creates greater responsibility and stewardship of the land and enhances personal responsibility while out there enjoying it for all parties and groups.

What I have proposed to local land managers, and gotten zero interest, is much simpler. EQUIPMENT RESTRICTIONS. FIM or Trials tires only and effective sound limits. If those two things were enforced, the MX bikes would have to stay on the track where they belong, unless their riders were willing to make the necessary modifications (not likely).

Sadly many land managers seem to prefer the, "give em enough rope" method of eliminating motorized use, and equally sadly many riders are willing to take that rope, and use it.

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Tip of the week:

Now that summer has officially begun (by our definition, not the calendar's)... lets talk sharing and courteous use.

1) Be aware that with very few exceptions, almost all motorized areas are open to the vast majority of other uses. This could mean hikers, equestrians, and of course other riders/drivers in the area. Slow down in tighter areas and where visibility is reduced.

2) Motorized users yield to everyone, everyone yields to equestrians. Stop and say hello to other users if given the opportunity.

3) Use caution around equestrians. While many trail horses are getting more accustomed to vehicular travel, they can still be easily spooked. Stop well ahead of them, and turn off your engine unless waived by. On quads and dirt bikes, stop on the downhill side of the trail, as a horse's instinct with uphill movement is to anticipate a predator.

4) In general, yield to uphill traffic. This is not a rule, it's a guideline. Use common sense please, and most of all be patient. We've all been in situations where its in the best interest of all parties to yield to downhill traffic.

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Now that I have the small bit out of the way, I want to address the bigger issues that have been brought up in this thread... I have to admit that I do enjoy seeing the discussion coming about here, as it brings up a number of important points.

First and foremost, I will admit that due to travel management changes and the subsequent travel designations that it would be both pointless and incorrect for me to try and convince you that there have not been closures and a loss of mileage of trails that have been ridden in the past. Some of those closures are justified in that they were unsustainably built or needed a reroute for any number of reasons. Some of that mileage was simply braided routes. Some needed additional management that was not provided by land managers or local adopting clubs. In the end, some of those miles were replaced, many were not. The process for that designation was and continues to be public, so I hope that everyone who is upset about any closures they have encountered had voiced their opinion in the form of clear and constructive comments during those public comment and review periods. If you did not, then please forgive me for being frank, but unfortunately in my honest opinion, you’ve effectively given up your right to complain. For anyone who is motivated (Hint: That should be everyone who likes to ride), all public comment periods and travel management periods can be found in the Federal Register as they are announced, delivered conveniently to your email every morning. http://listserv.access.gpo.gov/ Pretty easy way to keep tabs on what’s going on with our public lands. Now back onto the subject at hand…

It has long been said that the “Achilles Heel” of the motorized community is that the community doesn’t work well together. The dirt bikers don’t like the 4x4s, the ATVs vs. the dirt bikes. Throw the mixed-use community and the “anti-access” folks in, and here’s your result. A unified voice speaks volumes, as is seen in many areas of the nation where recreation groups have gotten together, fought it out and come up with cooperative plans to take to the land management agencies. Of all the higher-level land management staff I’ve spoken with, the vast majority prefer that to the divisive bickering between recreational groups that we tend to have most of the time. Cooperation, even if it takes a couple black eyes to get there (that’s strictly figurative, not literal. Please do not punch other users groups… see my comments on that below). Many other communities, including what some deem the “environmentalist” community, are very effective in their ability to reach out to their constituents and form cohesive arguments that they all can stand behind. That makes it very hard for an often-fractured motorized and true mixed-use community to pull against, especially considering that even the mere argument of motorized vs. environment is already skewed to the “green” side in the general public. It’s a whole lot easier to sell the unaware on the idea of protecting public lands from those “damned destructive dirt bikes and ATVs” when that’s the only exposure they have to them, incorrect as it may be.

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There have been many comments about the “eco-facism” or “environmental” movement working towards removing us, as dirt bike/ATV/UTV/4x4 enthusiasts, from our public lands. In all my experience, there are two things that I will disagree with about that statement. One is that I consider myself (along with thousands of other riders) to be a conservationist. I treasure our public lands and landscapes, the wildlife, clean water and air. I also treasure my ability to enjoy those public lands and landscapes through whichever means I happen to choose that day, be it on foot, horse, or rock crawler. That would be the difference between a conservationist and preservationist. I personally haven’t spent thousands of dollars and spilled tons of my own blood to have a built 4x4 that I can only drive to the mall or sit in my driveway rusting away. I am sure everyone here can look into their garage and share that type of feeling. That said, our ability to access public lands through any method comes with a responsibility. That responsibility is to tread lightly, leaving those lands as in good of shape, if not better shape so that our children and grandchildren and so on can continue to enjoy them through the same means we choose today. Our public lands are exactly that… public. That means they are managed for all people, of all backgrounds, for all to enjoy. That means that no one user group should have the upper hand, but that all should have the ability to share those with equal responsibility. I am not going to sit here and throw down the same old rhetoric of “one set of tracks takes thousands of years to go away”. But I will tell you while good ol’ Mother Nature has the ability to heal herself fairly well, it is not a free pass to do whatever we want, where ever we want, whenever we want. There are certainly some surfaces and environments that are more resilient than others, which is why we end up with travel designations; to protect those ecosystems and surfaces that are more susceptible to damage. As more and more people venture out, it becomes more and more important to make sure we are continuing to set a positive example and hold our peers accountable for their recreational habits.

The other point brings me back to the title of this thread. Why Tread Lightly!...? Well, here’s why. When the National Rifle Association goes up against proposed legislation to limit our right to bear arms, what are the arguments they use? They actively promote the fact that responsible owners of firearms do not kill innocent people. That hunters education courses help get our youth outside and breed a new generation of outdoor and wildlife conservationists. That concealed carry classes train people to be more aware and considerate of their surroundings. They don’t just go to Congress with an argument of “It’s our right, so… there.” They promote responsible use/ownership as an integral part of the continuation of being able to exercise those rights. The use of motorized vehicles is absolutely no different. Careless or malicious use of a motorized vehicle in fragile environments does for our ability to continue accessing those areas what a child finding a loaded firearm at home and accidently shooting his/her friend does for gun rights. Maybe my analogy is a little extreme, but it’s not entirely far-fetched. So many times we have cases of irresponsible use and user conflicts make the front page of the local news, but rarely is the positive side of clubs and individuals maintaining trails for all users, or doing benefits for local communities shown. That’s probably not likely to change soon, but we can all do our part to be responsible users which undermines the argument used by what I’ll deem “anti-access” (since again, I consider myself to be a conservationist) groups that we are all out there to tear things up. I have often challenged my OHV friends to actively engage their friends who may not be riders and invite them out for a ride, drive, or trail clean-up. This not only opens the door to dialogue about the benefits of responsible motorized use, but actions most definitely speak louder than words and they will likely remember the experience.

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So again, I encourage everyone. Be a responsible rider. Be an active participant in the travel management process. Be aware of travel management designations. Be an ambassador to the majority of public land users who probably don’t dislike dirt bikes, but don’t like seeing things torn up. I won’t promise that it’s the magic key to anything, but I will promise that it sure doesn’t hurt to have a solid “responsible use” foundation to stand on.

Now, to make sure there is no misunderstanding about where I personally stand… I have been an active 4x4 enthusiast for the better part of a decade. Ridden ATVs and dirt bikes for longer than that. Over the last few years, I was the program coordinator for a non-profit program in Colorado as a partner to Tread Lightly!. I have talked about the economic benefits of responsible motorized recreation on a local and state level, and promoted the thousands of hours that local clubs and volunteers have put in maintaining multi-use trails and areas. I’m a strong advocate of a well-run OHV registration program, which can fund millions of dollars in projects providing for sustainable motorized use. I have faced people who would easily fall into the classification of “anti-access”, and while there is very little headway to be gained with the few at that extreme, at least steered them away from the media-fueled stereotypes or had them trying to explain their shallow rhetoric. I am a rider, and will always be a rider. See you on the trails. :smirk:

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Two opportunities exist:

1) Dirt Bike Only Trails eliminates 80% of the yahoo factor. We have made great progress getting local managers to understand dirt bikers need non atv trails to eliminate conflicts and increase safety and to be FAIR !

Agreed. I have also worked with a couple of local land managers, and seen the proof on the trail that doing designated single track versus 50"/ATV trails provides a unique, and treasured, experience that the dirt bike community welcomes and can enjoy. My best example of that is Sidewinder (Peach Valley OHV Area, Montrose, CO). The BLM guys out there are riders, knew what other riders would be looking for, and working within the constraints of the BLM, produced a top-notch 26-mile trail that leaves you speechless at the end (mainly because it simply kicks your butt that whole time). :smirk:

2) Outlaws should work with guys like me to help direct our successes onto safe and sane loops that have no impact on Outlaws and their trails. Then your risks are your own to live with and we have zero impact on each other. But the blanket lobbying against any new legal trails within our community is silly and just makes Outlaws look totally selfish.

Our people don't build fences in the forest. In fact, we refuse to. We try to bridge the gap between our local group of Forest Managers and legal users that want fair access to public land. The masses don't want to ride outlaw trails anyway because many are above their head. But mostly they just prefer to enjoy the ride instead of looking over their shoulder. :smirk:

The ultimate best-case scenario would be to bring those "outlaw" trails into the designated system, and then work as a club/organization with the USFS/BLM to market those trails that are far beyond the standard level of skill as such. We should all work together to make sure that trail difficulty is not used as an excuse for off-trail travel, and educate the other users in our respective areas as to those conditions.

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The ultimate best-case scenario would be to bring those "outlaw" trails into the designated system, and then work as a club/organization with the USFS/BLM to market those trails that are far beyond the standard level of skill as such. We should all work together to make sure that trail difficulty is not used as an excuse for off-trail travel, and educate the other users in our respective areas as to those conditions.

Outlaws would not agree with you at all. And I feel their pain. Too much has been lost for NO GOOD reason.

I have enough to do to try and get trails added to the legal system. It can take years. I personally must ride legal to keep my credibility with land managers. I stay out of the way of those that choose their own path. I just want them to stay out of my way as well when I try to improve the legal system.

Outlaws and LEOs can play their cat and mouse game without me. I want nothing to do with it.

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Outlaws would not agree with you at all. And I feel their pain. Too much has been lost for NO GOOD reason.

I have enough to do to try and get trails added to the legal system. It can take years. I personally must ride legal to keep my credibility with land managers. I stay out of the way of those that choose their own path. I just want them to stay out of my way as well when I try to improve the legal system.

Outlaws and LEOs can play their cat and mouse game without me. I want nothing to do with it.

I can understand that. And definitely can applaud your efforts working with the land managers. I wish more shops took that pro-active approach.

But as a general PR for the OHV community thing... May not be the best idea to be openly admitting to "outlaw riding" on a public forum. Especially considering what I was talking about above... The need for that unified responsible community. That's just my .02 though...

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