My thoughts on Tubliss

It's been a little over a year since I put Nuetech Tubliss on the front and rear of my 300XC, and shortly after that I put them on my YZ125 (18" rear). Both bikes are used for trail riding in a variety of conditions, with both mx tires and the occasional trials rear. Here's my review:

CONS:

1. Regular maintenance is more of a hassle than standard tubes with rim locks. I find myself checking the inner and outer pressure every ride, and usually make small adjustments every time. I also feel more compelled to maintain rim strips, as an inner-bladder failure would be a big deal out on the trail. So far, I've either added layers, or outright replaced rim strips (tape), with each tire change due to spoke heads showing through.

2. Changing tires is also more of a hassle. When removing a tire, I find it hard to make sure the outer tire and inner red liner are separate from each other. My spoons keep wanting to grab both the outer and inner. When mounting a tire, I find it hard to get the rim inside of both beads as required by the Tubliss system. The piece of metal included with purchase that is used as a "shoe horn" helps a little. After about a dozen tire changes, it still takes me 2x longer than a traditional tube/tire.

3. They are expensive. I went with the recommended new tires on each install, which means roughly $150 per wheel. I've heard of people using used tires successfully, especially if they use tire sealant. Also expensive - after a tire does fail, it seems best to replace it rather than trust the plug/patch on another trail ride out into the middle of nowhere. I wouldn't feel the same way with a traditional set-up. Similarly, when I do flat I'm more likely to ride back to the trailhead on it (see PROS), which destroy$ the tire.

4. When used with a tire sealant such as Slime, tires aren't very repairable on the trail. Plugs don't want to stick, and a patch from the inside is out of the question.

5. An inner bladder failure on the trail would be a huge PITA.

6. Tire repair kits need to be rethought. I know people who tell me just to carry a 21" tube - but what about rim locks? I'd hate to go through the repair, only to rip a valve stem a few miles later. I'm still sorting-out what I carry, but the latest includes plugs and patches, but no tube. I've also stopped using Slime to make trail repairs more effective.

PROS:

1. Lower pressures, longer tire life. I'm not good enough to notice lighter weight.

2. I have been able to ride-out 3 flats without destroying my rims.

3. No rim dings. Even with a totally flat rear (outer) on very rocky terrain.

4. With tire sealant, punctures aren't much of a concern - only tears or pinch flats.

Yes, I listed more CONS than PROS. But overall, I'm happy and sticking with the Tubliss system for now.

wait till you try one with a trials tire

I dont run any slime, and I check psi every ride no matter what tubes I use, the nutech does not require any more time there for me

Yup, I've used both Dunlop and Pirelli rear trials with Tubliss. Down to 5psi.

I only use the pirelli, and I run 5 most of the time, and go down to like 3 if it's nasty

For mountain biking, I have used tubeless for six year or more. However, the two times I used Slime, I had trouble with it sealing thorn flats. Notubes.com sealant is amazing, in case you want to try something new. I have almost always used Notubes/Stan's sealant and it has been an amazing sealant. Maybe give that a shot instead of Slime. It is considered a far superior sealant in the MTB world.

Good report.

I have used Tubliss front and rear on two bikes for over two years. I find it much easier to change tires now. I have had several puncture flats, all of which were easily and permanently plug repairable. I use Slime as a mounting lubricant and have had no issues with air leakage in either the high pressure tube or in the tire. While rim pinches are a thing of the past, rim dings are still possible though less likely.

For mountain biking, I have used tubeless for six year or more. However, the two times I used Slime, I had trouble with it sealing thorn flats. Notubes.com sealant is amazing, in case you want to try something new. I have almost always used Notubes/Stan's sealant and it has been an amazing sealant. Maybe give that a shot instead of Slime. It is considered a far superior sealant in the MTB world.

I've been riding mtb tubeless for about 9 years now and have used Stan's sealant (or mold builder) that entire time. I tried it in my Tubliss kit and that sealant just dries up too fast. It does not work in moto tires.

Another reason why it doesn't work is because of the large holes you can get in moto tires. That sealant is only for tiny holes and even then it is hit and miss.

I'm not sure why, but Slime works much better for larger holes and works better in moto tires.

I know this is kind of apples to watermelons, but....

I ripped a hole in a tire on a trailer in some nasty rocks in the clockum. my spare had the wrong hole spacing (f#$@!!!!) I did have a plug kit, but the hole was big enough to stick my thumb through. I stuffed every plug I had in it and it sealed up. that was in 2004 and at least 10k miles ago. I sold that trailer with the plug and the guy still has the same tire on it and it still has not dropped any air worth speaking of. I trust a well placed plug. I have a lot of them in my fleet that are holding. that is the biggest appeal of the tubliss for me.

I hot a rock so hard last week that I would have probably pinched flatted my tire let alone a tube. Thankfully I was running a Goldentyre mousse.

Interesting. Slime was having trouble sealing small thorn holes but I guess the massive tires need something thicker. I'm very interested in the tubeless system in motos, though it will be next season before I switch. In the meantime, I will watch and learn.

I've been riding mtb tubeless for about 9 years now and have used Stan's sealant (or mold builder) that entire time. I tried it in my Tubliss kit and that sealant just dries up too fast. It does not work in moto tires.

Another reason why it doesn't work is because of the large holes you can get in moto tires. That sealant is only for tiny holes and even then it is hit and miss.

I'm not sure why, but Slime works much better for larger holes and works better in moto tires.

It's been a little over a year since I put Nuetech Tubliss on the front and rear of my 300XC, and shortly after that I put them on my YZ125 (18" rear). Both bikes are used for trail riding in a variety of conditions, with both mx tires and the occasional trials rear. Here's my review:

CONS:

1. Regular maintenance is more of a hassle than standard tubes with rim locks. I find myself checking the inner and outer pressure every ride, and usually make small adjustments every time. I also feel more compelled to maintain rim strips, as an inner-bladder failure would be a big deal out on the trail. So far, I've either added layers, or outright replaced rim strips (tape), with each tire change due to spoke heads showing through.

2. Changing tires is also more of a hassle. When removing a tire, I find it hard to make sure the outer tire and inner red liner are separate from each other. My spoons keep wanting to grab both the outer and inner. When mounting a tire, I find it hard to get the rim inside of both beads as required by the Tubliss system. The piece of metal included with purchase that is used as a "shoe horn" helps a little. After about a dozen tire changes, it still takes me 2x longer than a traditional tube/tire.

3. They are expensive. I went with the recommended new tires on each install, which means roughly $150 per wheel. I've heard of people using used tires successfully, especially if they use tire sealant. Also expensive - after a tire does fail, it seems best to replace it rather than trust the plug/patch on another trail ride out into the middle of nowhere. I wouldn't feel the same way with a traditional set-up. Similarly, when I do flat I'm more likely to ride back to the trailhead on it (see PROS), which destroy$ the tire.

4. When used with a tire sealant such as Slime, tires aren't very repairable on the trail. Plugs don't want to stick, and a patch from the inside is out of the question.

5. An inner bladder failure on the trail would be a huge PITA.

6. Tire repair kits need to be rethought. I know people who tell me just to carry a 21" tube - but what about rim locks? I'd hate to go through the repair, only to rip a valve stem a few miles later. I'm still sorting-out what I carry, but the latest includes plugs and patches, but no tube. I've also stopped using Slime to make trail repairs more effective.

PROS:

1. Lower pressures, longer tire life. I'm not good enough to notice lighter weight.

2. I have been able to ride-out 3 flats without destroying my rims.

3. No rim dings. Even with a totally flat rear (outer) on very rocky terrain.

4. With tire sealant, punctures aren't much of a concern - only tears or pinch flats.

Yes, I listed more CONS than PROS. But overall, I'm happy and sticking with the Tubliss system for now.

Good write up. I've been using them for a couple of seasons, too. Here's my take if you don't mind:

Cons:

1 Agree. Regular maintenance is a must. I'm not sure if the act of putting on and taking off my pump lets out air from the inner tube, but I run it up to 110-115 every time, and it always is 80 when I put the pump (with gauge) back on it.

2 Opposite for me. I can change a tire like a nascar pit crew with tubliss. Now you've got me nervous about the tape, I'll be adding to that on the next change. I use silicone spray on assembly.

3 Expensive! I've had good luck running used tires.

4 Same boat here. I've been runnung slime again, but it made cleaning for a plug harder. Fuel works to clean it up, permanent plug.

5 Agreed. I have no plan B

6 See 5!

Agree on the Pro's, only I would put tire changes squarely in the Pro column. I consistently run about 2 psi lower than with tubes and have far fewer problems on the trail. Trailside repairs (only had 2) are much easier. I love the system overall.

Have tubliss f/r on a YZ450 for past 3-4 months; roughly 15-20 hours on the tires. Love it ... until this past weekend. I was careful with the install and had no issues. Unbelievable how well they hold air between rides. Got out to the dez the aftermoon before a race and got a front flat putting around near camp with my daughter. The inner tube blew apparently all by itself on easy terrain. Was running 14 psi at the time and taking it easy. Found a 1"+ rupture in a location that didn't see tire irons or have any other obvious initiation sources. Safe bet it would've gone during the race if I hadn't done the play ride. Had a spare tubliss tube for the race. Three flats (punctures) with tubes in the past 800 hours of riding (per engine time logs). 1 flat without obvious cause in 15 hours with a tubliss. Hmmmmm

On the fence with tubliss right now. Currently have less faith in them than tubes. Like being able to run the low pressures. My good luck with tubes is likely due to running higher pressures in rocky riding areas. Maybe mousse or balls next??

After several months of riding without Slime, I've decided to put it back in to my tubliss equipped tires.

Although Slime-less punctures are really easy to fix, they are still a nuisance. I'd rather deal with the Slime and not deal with the little punctures.

After several months of riding without Slime, I've decided to put it back in to my tubliss equipped tires.

Although Slime-less punctures are really easy to fix, they are still a nuisance. I'd rather deal with the Slime and not deal with the little punctures.

I have had GREAT SUCCESS quickly fixing larger punctures with the BLACK colored rubber rope plugs - WITHOUT cleaning off the slime -(It's makes locating the hole easier)- AND I actually use the Slime as a lubricant to get the plug in with NO problems at all. Just don't cut the plug too short or it will suck back into the tire.

first ride on my tubless (only rear) and got a 8p nail dead center in a mt43 (new) it went all the way through into the bladder. tire flat bladder flat. (what luck!) buddy went back to the truck and brought back a hand pump and a bottle of slime. put slime in bladder and tire (nail removed of course) had to pump both tire and bladder up about 4 times. had to fire up the bike and spin the tire, and both sealed up when doing that. so you can seal up an inner bladder on the trail. I had problems removing the red liner when changing the bladder--my fault . one note!! i had the old bladder hanging on the wall still holding air and the rubber disintegrated from being in the open air?? have a new one in a box, guess i should ck it. so i would say a co2 and plugging kit should work with most flats. just my 2c.

Im interested in this as i JUST recently found out about this system. But for the most part im seeing more people focusing on maintenance/tire removal rather handling and feel. 


Im more curious as to how the bike turns in compared to a traditional tubed system ?  Another thing is they show pictures of a bike with this system and it has the rear tire wit much more contact due to being able to run lower pressures.. Is there any sense of rolling affect that you commonly get when tires are lower pressure ? 

I feel like with the image i saw of the back tire it looked basically flat. and since these manufacturers primarily make their tires for regular tubed systems i wonder how well they actually perform with such little pressure.  

For some reason im imagining on the track having this it would feel some what dead when entering a turn since the tire may have a rolling sensation. But then again im no expert so i honestly have no clue on how it would perform. just my guess. 

I primarily ride on the track, i don't have problems with my regular run of the mill tubes .. But if there is an advantage with these over the regular tubes whether it be better grip or just better feel id be interested.

Im interested in this as i JUST recently found out about this system. But for the most part im seeing more people focusing on maintenance/tire removal rather handling and feel. 

Im more curious as to how the bike turns in compared to a traditional tubed system ?  Another thing is they show pictures of a bike with this system and it has the rear tire wit much more contact due to being able to run lower pressures.. Is there any sense of rolling affect that you commonly get when tires are lower pressure ? 

I feel like with the image i saw of the back tire it looked basically flat. and since these manufacturers primarily make their tires for regular tubed systems i wonder how well they actually perform with such little pressure.  

For some reason im imagining on the track having this it would feel some what dead when entering a turn since the tire may have a rolling sensation. But then again im no expert so i honestly have no clue on how it would perform. just my guess. 

I primarily ride on the track, i don't have problems with my regular run of the mill tubes .. But if there is an advantage with these over the regular tubes whether it be better grip or just better feel id be interested.

 

If you run really low PSI on hard terrain your back tire will wallow and the front will feel a little vague. There are other advantages to the product at the track. Its lighter than a ultra HD tube and maybe a HD tube. You can run less pressure than with a tube on soft tracks.. just air back up on hard tracks (conditions). The biggest thing is protection tho...  Pinch flats are next to impossible to get. Puncture flats become a quick simple repair. In a blow out or sidewall tear situation your tire wont come off the rim. The system really shines off road where you can run 0-5psi and tractor up hills and basically stick to rocks (with appropriate tire choice) but there are a number of reviews for MX applications and they're all very positive. 

Edited by SenorThumpy

The advantage for me is low pressure without flats.

Any tire will wallow more at lower pressures. I'm not a fast guy but can easily feel it. Varies by tire of course.

For the possibility of a inner high pressure tube failure, i carry (on long rides or enduro races ) about 10 tie straps that are medium large and can go around the tire and rim.

Ive never needed to use it but have been told that will keep a rear tire from spinning so you can get back out. i,m thinking that would weigh alot less than tire irons and a tube

I love the low pressure traction and less abuse from rough terrain.

Edited by cndStrom

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