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Muddy Uphills, with no momentum. HOW?

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So I went riding yesterday. It was wet, no surprise. There is one section, it goes sharp (100+ degree) turn, muddy spot, hill. The hill is all muddy my rear wheel spins until the bike stops moving, and even starts to go backwards. Every time I got to this hill, I had to get off the bike and push it up, with the rear wheel spinning. :prof: I am on a KX125, and on 1st gear. I tried it on 2nd, same thing happened, except it started going sideways.

How do you guys get up these hills??

Thanks! :smirk::smirk:

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A good tire and lean back hammer down as soon as you can usuAlly works for me

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Look for structure, weeds rocks grass clumps bark sticks etc. Also if there's a narrow rut line you can sometimes get your side knobs into play.

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Try setting towards the back much as you can. What kind of tire are you running?

I'm running a Dunlop Tire, not sure of the make, seems to work well in other types of mud and climbs

Nos..

LOL:smirk:

Look for structure, weeds rocks grass clumps bark sticks etc. Also if there's a narrow rut line you can sometimes get your side knobs into play.

Everytime I try to get off the side, beside the mud rut I created :smirk: The front goes where I want, but the back stays in the rut.

Edited by Crf Rider09
adding

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I race a cr134 in hare scrambles and when I run into muddy hills like that the only solution is sitting back a little on the seat and a health dose of throttle. You really can't chug these 125's up hills so your only hope is to get more traction.....move back on the seat and make sure you pick the best line.

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Its all in clutch technique.Feather the clutch slightly to control wheel spin.The way to learn it is to come to a complete stop at the bottom of a slick hill or creek bank.When you can ride out every time you have learned it.

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there's no harder machine to do it on than a 125 two stroke, I would still race/trailride on one if it were not for muddy hills

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I race a cr134 in hare scrambles and when I run into muddy hills like that the only solution is sitting back a little on the seat and a health dose of throttle. You really can't chug these 125's up hills so your only hope is to get more traction.....move back on the seat and make sure you pick the best line.

I was standing most of the time :lol: probably made it even worse. And if I try to pick a different line, my front follows my direction, but my back follows the "mud rut". There is only about 2 ft. to work with.

Its all in clutch technique.Feather the clutch slightly to control wheel spin.The way to learn it is to come to a complete stop at the bottom of a slick hill or creek bank.When you can ride out every time you have learned it.

I didn't really think of using the clutch. Good idea, I'll try next time I ride. :smirk:

there's no harder machine to do it on than a 125 two stroke, I would still race/trailride on one if it were not for muddy hills

It seems to work fine on any other hill or muddy spot. And its hard to give up the weight, power, responsiveness, and nimbleness of a 125 2t. :lol::prof:

Thanks for all your guys help! :lol::smirk:

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Sorry, but the only useful tip I have for this situation is:

:prof:

Go back down and get another run at it... :smirk:

But at least, you know more about the first part of the hill so next run should be at least a little better... And of course, use some of the helpful tips already presented.

but why beat yourself up when you can have more fun by starting the climb over again? :smirk:

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Lower tire pressure.

New tire if yours is smoked.

Can you make it up the hill when it's dry? It's possible that there's nothing in the world you can do to get up that hill, and you're just tearing it up for nothing.

And it's not the "Internet approved" technique, but sitting on the back of the seat, feet paddling gets me up some bad stuff a lot easier than standing up and pretending to know what I'm doing.

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I can make it fine when its not muddy. My tires are decent like 75% tread left, and I will try lower air pressures. What do you guys run in 19" tires? There aren't many rocks, mostly just dirt, grass, water, and mud.

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I can make it fine when its not muddy. My tires are decent like 75% tread left, and I will try lower air pressures. What do you guys run in 19" tires? There aren't many rocks, mostly just dirt, grass, water, and mud.

75% left probably means you have 0% sharp edge on the knobs of your tire, which will make it nearly impossible to do. I just bought a Knobbyknife to "sharpen " up my rear since I don't have the cash for a new tire all the time.

If the tire is packing up with mud, wheelspin may be your friend if it will clean out the tire.

Momentum is definitely your friend, carry as much speed as you can and lean back to get the weight where you need it.

I think a good starting point for pressure is 14#, on the terrain you described you might be able to go a few # lower than that. 12? maybe lower. depends what you weigh and if you're going to find that one rock that ll give you a pinch flat.

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And it's not the "Internet approved" technique, but sitting on the back of the seat, feet paddling gets me up some bad stuff a lot easier than standing up and pretending to know what I'm doing.

Do what ever you have to

I think a good starting point for pressure is 14#, on the terrain you described you might be able to go a few # lower than that. 12? maybe lower.

You don't mention your weight. The 125 is pretty light.

I'd try 8 psi.

I'm at 175 pounds on a pretty light bike. I run 9.5 front, 9 rear Despite all the "Internet Approved" tire pressure recomendations I've not had a pinch flat in years.

You might need to get a pressure gauge that'll read accurately at those pressures.

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Well I'm about 110 with gear. And its a 03 KX125, so about 300lbs the bike and me. Do you think 10 psi would be good?

In the words of Shane Watts, "10-12 psi is golden". When you tried in second were you working the clutch or just pinning it?

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Well the first time i did it in 2nd i pinned it, the second time, i was clutching, but the wheel was still spinning. Its only my 5th ride with the KX on trails, my first at this riding spot, so i'm still practising the whole feathering thing.

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My wr came with dunlops stock--I think they were 739 maybe--rated "intermediate towards hardpack but will work good in mud too". They were crap in mud or slick or deep loamy stuff. It was dealable with tire pressure 10-11#. They were great on hardpack/rock though--but on soft loam/mud etc--yeah right. Now I have Bridgestone M203/204, and they work great in the mud/slick. Bite nice, not so gooey soft feel. Tho of course nice new sharp tires make a diff too ha!

I've been stopped up on those hills where you just slide backwards before you can even get going again. I just back down to a flat enough spot to get some momentum up(work the the clutch) to go at it again. And try to make sure people in front of me get up then I have a free shot. Though I'm working on blowing past people--my kids are old enough now to take care of themselves ha!!

BTW, it seems my 2nd gear has a lot of sideways torque(?) on slick(skool me on why?), I try to be real smooth on the throttle and just let is be that way, but the slightest blip just makes it scoot sideways. 1st and 3rd are a lot smoother(tho I realize I'm speaking about my 4 and OP is on a 2). My bike's happy gear is 3rd anyway--I use 3rd in mud generally, because it feels the best "balanced" in power to spin or something-y.

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