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How do you decide which Kouba link to install?

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I assume you want to use the smallest one possible in order to avoid changing the bike's suspension too much.

Is the fact that my jeans are size 36x30 a good indicator of my inseem or do you really need to use a tape measure like a tailor would?

I currently have the Seat Concepts low seat installed and still need to stand on my toes at a stop. I'm a little under 5-10 and 195 lbs.

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easy question ....none !!!

the lowering links change the effective spring rate making the bike softly sprung even w the same spring rate this in turn makes it handle worse. You may be able to get a heavier spring to compensate but IDK how you would figure out which spring would be right

I am the same size as you and ride w the bike as it is w out the lowered seat (although that is tempting)

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easy question ....none !!!

the lowering links change the effective spring rate making the bike softly sprung even w the same spring rate this in turn makes it handle worse. You may be able to get a heavier spring to compensate but IDK how you would figure out which spring would be right

I am the same size as you and ride w the bike as it is w out the lowered seat (although that is tempting)

From what I've read you can tightened up your suspension a bit after installing one and that the smallest Kouba link isn't such a big deal.

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I've used 2 different lengths of Kouba links on my DRZ and there is a big difference between how they mess with your suspension. The #1 is about 3/4" lower and doesn't mess things up too much if you aren't a really hard / fast rider in real rough terrain. The suspension is softened because of the change of lever arm length in the middle of a balanced system, so you will bottom out more if you ride hard. The #2 gives you about 1 1/4" lowering but it crushes your rear spring on even medium hits. You can't add preload to compensate, it doesn't work that way: It doesn't make your spring stronger throughout the full range of travel, but the link applies more force to your spring the further it compresses it. I went from the stock 5.4 kg to a 5.7 kg RaceTech spring and it wasn't enough. I weigh 170 lbs and was still bottoming hard.

You also have to raise your forks in the triple clamps an equal amount or the bike won't steer correctly. You can easily raise them the 3/4", I added bar risers. The 1 1/4" is more difficult and you are getting awfully close to bottoming your front tire into your fender.

Here are some other options: http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=970547

I have a Kouba #1 and a Seat Concepts lowered seat on my current DRZ, a 29" inseam, and I struggle to reach the ground.

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Kouba #1 is generally considered acceptable for a rider up to 150 pounds. #2 only works if you weigh 110 pounds. The #3 is good for the 60 pound riders. If you weigh more and need the lowering action, get the correct spring fo your weight and have a shop shorten the shock and forks.

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I'm about your inseam as well. I usually slide my butt to one side slightly at a stop and just put one foot down (flat footed). It's a dirt bike and is tall to offer ground clearance when riding off road. At first it seemed way to tall but over time I got used to it and now I don't even think about it being too tall. Since the bike is pretty new to you I suggest you keep riding and you'll get more comfortable with it. If you must lower it do it as William1 says and avoid the lowering links.

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Kouba #1 is generally considered acceptable for a rider up to 150 pounds. #2 only works if you weigh 110 pounds. The #3 is good for the 60 pound riders. If you weigh more and need the lowering action, get the correct spring fo your weight and have a shop shorten the shock and forks.

So then at 195 pounds none of the links are usable for me?

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Yes and no. For the cost of a link, the type of riding you have, a #1 link is fine. Based on your experience level and the kinds of riding you do, the negative effects of a #1 link on a otherwise stock sprun bike will be Ok. If you feeel you need the additional lowering a #2 gives you, then you have to get a stiffer rear shock spring.

Thing is, you need to lower the front as much as you do the back. You can lower the front the same as a #1 link. You cannot quite make it with a #2. Hence the #1 probably being acceptable.

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Toes down at a stop are good enough. Flat footed on a dirt bike gives up a ton of ground clearance and suspension travel and it screws up the geometry...so it does not work right.

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Sounds like we are the same size. Big cruisers may require both feet down flat, but our bikes are light weight so practice draging the rear brake (and slipping the clutch when needed) to the point where you can come to a complete stop without putting your foot down. Then you can lean the bike to one side (always the up hill side) when you are ready to put your foot down. Our bikes are much easier than cruisers in that their weight will cause ones foot to slip out from under them (crash) if one happens to step in oil, even though they are much lower.

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