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I kow there are a thousand threads about this but i have bin doing starts at my usual riding area, generally deep sand. But when i do my starts i go high rev in 1st not second cus i ride a 85 and let the cluth out and she bogs. But when i refresh my rev it goes fine. Why is this?:smirk:

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Don't let the clutch out fast.. Don't pop the clutch.. Hold the thottle 3/4 open and don't close it.. You are doing one of these three.

On starts, your throttle controls enigine speed. Clutch controls wheel speed or traction. Hold your throttle open, and with your outside three fingers maintain control of the clutch while you hold with index and thumb. Release the clutch slow the the friction point. Wait for the gate to drop and ease your clutch out with control It should take about 10 to 15 feet before you clutch is out and you are in full throttle control

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You should start in second. It doesn't matter if your on an 85 or 250. 65`s start in second. And everything force said is pretty much spot on.

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I try to but it always cuts out but it might be cus im letting the clutch out to quick

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Its cutting out or bogging because your dropping the clutch to fast. When the gate drops open the throttle fully and SLOWLY release the clutch. The clutch lever controls traction not the throttle. Keep releasing the clutch until you are about 10-20 feet out. Even then keep a finger or two on the clutch in case the front end starts lifting up, then gently pull the clutch in just enough to put the front wheel back down. . . all while keeping the throttle wide open.

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^what he said. You control the bike with the cutch till ur about 10 feet out, then WOT. Its sounds confusing, but once you go on the track and try its so easy.

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Oh ok cus im stuck i wont be able to practice it for im going ot a club ive never been to with limited experience of tracks.

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There is nothing wrong with starting in first, you just need to shift sooner than if you start in second. Meaning you will need to start with your left foot on the peg and under the shifter to get the first shift just off the gate. How much do you weigh? Your weight may have something to do with the 85 bogging on launch or engine tune also.

When I raced 125's (B class in the early to mid 90's) I always started in first due to a bog if I started in second (and before you guys start... I got my share of whole shots) You just need to find what works for you. If your getting the whole shot then it works, if not, then you need to try something different. Some good advice has already been given in the previous posts, mainly clutch control. The problem may also be body position. A good whole shot is a fine art, all aspects need sharp attention to detail. You are looking for that fine line between too much wheel speed and too much traction. That all can be controlled by, throttle, clutch, and body position if all other variables are in good working order, such as motorcycle and launch surface.

Search Andrew short on the web. He has several good training sessions on whole shots, I think on you tube.

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There is nothing wrong with starting in first, you just need to shift sooner than if you start in second. Meaning you will need to start with your left foot on the peg and under the shifter to get the first shift just off the gate. How much do you weigh? Your weight may have something to do with the 85 bogging on launch or engine tune also.

When I raced 125's (B class in the early to mid 90's) I always started in first due to a bog if I started in second (and before you guys start... I got my share of whole shots) You just need to find what works for you. If your getting the whole shot then it works, if not, then you need to try something different. Some good advice has already been given in the previous posts, mainly clutch control. The problem may also be body position. A good whole shot is a fine art, all aspects need sharp attention to detail. You are looking for that fine line between too much wheel speed and too much traction. That all can be controlled by, throttle, clutch, and body position if all other variables are in good working order, such as motorcycle and launch surface.

Search Andrew short on the web. He has several good training sessions on whole shots, I think on you tube.

I have to disagree with the starting with you foot on the peg, you should always start with both feet touching the ground, in front of the peg. This stabilizes your weight. Don't pull your feet up until you need to shift, pulling your feet up throws off your balance. Practice shifting with your heel as you bring it up to put on the peg, but don't use that at a race until you have the technique down, it's pretty easy to mess up. But always do what you feel comfortable with. Its possible to start in second, however it is usually faster to start in first. It practiced and timed both multiple times with my 125, the only place it was faster to start in second was in deep sandbeds because the lack of traction allowed the RPMs to get higher. I had my dad time me a couple of times, which I also recommend. What feels fastest might not be. Start with the clutch already at the beginning of the friction point with the front brake held in. Have the bike revved up, but not on the rev limiter. Hopefully this helps, its gotten me quite a few holeshots. Now if only I could get dead engine starts down....

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I have to disagree with the starting with you foot on the peg, you should always start with both feet touching the ground, in front of the peg. This stabilizes your weight. Don't pull your feet up until you need to shift, pulling your feet up throws off your balance. Practice shifting with your heel as you bring it up to put on the peg, but don't use that at a race until you have the technique down, it's pretty easy to mess up. But always do what you feel comfortable with. Its possible to start in second, however it is usually faster to start in first. It practiced and timed both multiple times with my 125, the only place it was faster to start in second was in deep sandbeds because the lack of traction allowed the RPMs to get higher. I had my dad time me a couple of times, which I also recommend. What feels fastest might not be. Start with the clutch already at the beginning of the friction point with the front brake held in. Have the bike revved up, but not on the rev limiter. Hopefully this helps, its gotten me quite a few holeshots. Now if only I could get dead engine starts down....

I think the best advice in this post is to use a stop watch and have someone check your times at a specific distance, great advice. As far as one foot verses two feet down... to each is their own. Just because your balance may not be good doesn't the next person's isn't. The main point is, try all the variables and see what works for you.

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Your best bet is to go practice your starts using different techniques, Use the technique that you think is more comfortable for you. Over time you will improve on these.

Afterall you could find that you can get off the line quickly-on your own that is.

When you line up elbow to elbow with 30 other bikes you'll find that nerves or other things could affect you. IT ALL TAKES PRACTICE,PRACTICE,PRACTICE.

As for your bogging problem. Your bike should start fine in first or second. Its all about revs and clutch control from a stop. Think of your clutch as a manual traction control. If you dump the clutch, you'll either end up with the too much power at the wheel- which will leave it spinning, or not enough power straight away-which will stall the engine.

Have around 3/4 throttle, this has the engine producing adequate revs to avoid stalling the bike. When the gate drops let the clutch out smoothly, over time you'll get this down. the wheel should grip and move the bike off the line with as little wheel spin as possible, keep the clutch still disengaged a tad till you know you can hammer the throttle on.

Again practice, practice, practice.

Good luck in your next race!

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