WR250X kick stand length & material?

I'm looking for a stand for my motarded WR450F. The stock cast aluminum stand has a continuously taporing c-section most of its length, so removing an inch or two from the center doesn't seem feasible. I can tell that a few mods will need to be made to accommodate the 250X stand, but I want to make the length is right before proceeding, so...

What length is the stand from the swivel bolt center to the end of the pad?

Is the stand aluminum or steel?

Thanks for your help!

My WR250R stand is steel, center of bolt to pad is 13.5 inches. You can look in Yamaha parts list to see if stand is the same, I'm fairly sure the X and R use the same one.

Thanks Yamaguy55,

Indeed, the 250X and R part numbers are the same.

The 13.5" length is perfect! The WR450 stand length is 15" and I was looking to lose 1.5"

One of the very best things, in a whole host of good/great things, about Yamaha, is that if you really do your legwork, you can move parts from one model/type/year/etc to the other. In the early 70s, Yamaha sold a single cylinder two stroke called the SC500. It had a 4 speed gearbox as they were not sure the thinner gears of a five speed could take the engine. It also had typical suspension from 1974: terrible. If you still had one of these by the late 70s, you could fit the gearbox from a YZ400 and the forks as well, and actually have a very nice bike. This interchangeability requires one to do their homework, but it pays off. All of the open class two strokes used the same crank seals and bearings, so a lot of swapping/modding was possible. Many of the transmissions were the same way.

Good it worked out for you. That measurement I gave you was center of pad on floor to center of bolt hole, give or take a 1/16th inch.

Your point about legwork is essential. Even though the kick stand part numbers that I found for 2009 X's and R's were the same at Twin County Motorsports website (it's possible I messed up somehow...), I went to the local dealership and found that the X stand was only 12 inches while the R stand is 13.5 inches.

I need to make sure that I get the right part number for the 250R!

I think trailtech makes a 1 or 1.5 inch lower stand for supermoto. Or maybe it was PMB.

On the opposite end of this, have any 'R' guys extended their kick stands? Mine drives me nuts!

On the opposite end of this, have any 'R' guys extended their kick stands? Mine drives me nuts!

No, my WRR is lowered, so if anything, I need to cut some off.

No, my WRR is lowered, so if anything, I need to cut some off.

That is next on my list, to lower it. I had a friend of mine try it yesterday, (he is a Vet A rider, i am a crappy rider, but i don't fall down and wad it up trying to be someone i'm not, i suck, and i know it)anyway, i could tell by the look in his eye my bike wasn't set up right. He (nicely) said it's very un-balanced, and i have to start by getting the rear end down. I know when these first came out, and i bought mine, there was a post or two about 'balance'. Mine is almost bone stock, i think i just slowed down the rebound in the rear a little, two years ago. Without taking up too much of someones time, can you please steer me in the right direction on a thread/post or something on balance and some set-up 'must do' basics on the WRR. I would really like to get my bike in the ball park, then bring it back by my friend and let him go from there.

Thanks,

Mike.

That is next on my list, to lower it. I had a friend of mine try it yesterday, (he is a Vet A rider, i am a crappy rider, but i don't fall down and wad it up trying to be someone i'm not, i suck, and i know it)anyway, i could tell by the look in his eye my bike wasn't set up right. He (nicely) said it's very un-balanced, and i have to start by getting the rear end down. I know when these first came out, and i bought mine, there was a post or two about 'balance'. Mine is almost bone stock, i think i just slowed down the rebound in the rear a little, two years ago. Without taking up too much of someones time, can you please steer me in the right direction on a thread/post or something on balance and some set-up 'must do' basics on the WRR. I would really like to get my bike in the ball park, then bring it back by my friend and let him go from there.

Thanks,

Mike.

Send me a PM. I'm on the road right now, but I can set you up to where I am, it took quite a bit of trial and error to get here, but is very good now. No MX bike, but not bad. I'll be home by Sunday and try and et back to you.

First thing is to adjust the rear shock spring preload to achieve 3.5 inches of rear suspension compression (known as sag) with your weight on the seat.

This is when comparing a measurement of the rear suspension fully extended to a measurement of when you are sitting on the seat.

Measure from the same two points on the bike, like from the rear axle center to a spot on the rear fender.

Much easier with someone doing the measuring part while you do the sitting part. :ride:

Thanks a lot guys. I have had a lot of off-road toys over the years, most with decent factory shocks, with plenty of ways to adjust them. I've learned long ago not to 'get lost' and do too much at once. I can feel what a unit needs, i just have a hard time getting it to do what i want. I don't think our bikes have a high and low speed comp? Those 2 i will never figure out. I guess i've been on my bike a lot more this summer, and i feel like i'm starting to ride hard enough and decent enough that stock settings are no longer doing the job.

Thanks again.

Mike.

I have a wr250r also and it took some messing around to get it decent. First thing was to lower the rear, the thing was just way too twitchy on the street and a real handful on slippery trails at speed. Luckily there is a way to adjust height w/o messing with spring preload and sag. Yamaha was nice enough to put a height adjuster on the bottom of the shock, use it first.

Secondly is the valving. The rear doesn't have near enough rebound dampening and in the front the compression dampening is just plain wacky. The rear will launch you off the bike when the spring unloads if youre not ready for it and the front is harsh on small stuff but bottoms on big stuff. On rocky trails the front deflects and is hard to keep it going where you want it to go at speed and on any kind of jump it just blows through all the travel and bottoms.

While I'm sure the fact that it has less travel than a dirt bike has something to do with it I tend to believe that most of the problems lie in the shim stacks. The shock is a copy of a decent KYB unit and the front uses KYB 46U open cartridge forks, the same as used in the YZ up to around 05 so they should be able to be dialed in to any kind or riding style. I'm thinking that a full re-valve is the only way to do a complete fix(the spring rates seem OK to me) but until I can afford to pay someone to do it for me or somehow gain the courage to do it myself here is what I did to get mine at least decent.

In the rear, after checking sag( I weigh around 185 w/o gear and didn't have to mess w/ spring preload at all)I turned up the rebound to full slow(all the way in) but I think I'm not too far off the factory setting for compression. In the front I tried to turn out the compression the make it more plush on small stuff but that exacerbated the problem of bottoming so I added 15-20 ml of fork oil to each leg and that helped a lot. I think I'm not too far off the stock setting for rebound in the front.

I'm by no means a suspension guru(I know how it works but have very little experience actually doing it)but for the kind of stuff I ride(I like technical stuff) it does OK now, not great but better than most Japanese dual-sports. I still wouldn't blast through big whoops, take big jumps but in my opinion, its better than it was.

I lowered the rear, using the threaded rod and clevis block on the end of the shock, but i'm not sure if i got the jamb nut on against the clevis tight enough? I was afraid it'd turn and i'd never be able to line it up if i tightened it while dis-connected, and while i had it bolted up, i couldn't get a cresent wrench in there perfect. (I have wrench sizes under and one size bigger, so i had to be a Cave Man with a cresent wrench.) How can that turn, or 'go any place' anyway? If the spring seat can be turned/rotated, then a guy could tighten it up, and turn the whole clevis, (after thought) I held the spring seat with a wrench so it didn't turn, but i'm not sure if it even matters?

I did the forks too, and had a very hard time twisting and convincing them to slide! Then re-adjust the chain kicked my butt, so an hour job took me about 3 hrs!

My clickers were either 'on', or within 1 of where suggested.

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