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compression and rebound, none!

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I just did a first time seal replacement, for the bike and myself, on the rear shock absorber on a 2009 yz450f.

The bladder was empty, there was oil leaking so I figured those were my problems but appparently its not.

I had the same problem before i took it apart and now its still not fixed....

anyways... here is the problem; the shock isn't absorbing like it should. The compression nor rebound are working as they once did. I get nothing with my clickers and I have no idea what else to look for.

Its like i'm riding around on a spring and no absorber. Its pretty terrible. Maybe the internal guts of it are worn out and just letting all the oil flow inside with no resistance?

pleaasee helpp, summer just got here and i'm desperate to ride.

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what bike/shock?

what did you do when fixing the shock

did you charge N2 and what pressure

You might think about to give it to a specialist

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its off of an 09 yz450f its just the stock shock.

i just replaced the seal and recharged the nitrogen, I got it charged to 150PSI at the shop.

perhaps i do need to take it to a specialist. But if its something i can do I'd rather get it myself.

A friend helped me rebuild it, he had rebuilt his 08 yz450 rear shock and it worked. The bladder held the nitrogen, its not empty no oil has leaked out so I don't beleive those are problems.

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Too much air in the damper oil? Improper bleed?

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perhaps, the walkthrough we had just said to re-assemble after you put about 30-50PSI into the bladder, after filling the reservoir about halfway. I never did put more oil in, nor did I have to bleed air out anywhere. Do you know of a walkthrough I can follow? I have a manual as a resource too.

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Bleeding the air out of a shock can be tedious. Now, this could result in an injury to you if your shock isnt done correctly. You really should send it to a profesional.

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Bleeding the air out of a shock can be tedious. Now, this could result in an injury to you if your shock isnt done correctly. You really should send it to a profesional.

I don't know...I don't think it's very hard or dangerous for most shocks, and I'm certainly no long time expert on it. The only safety issue might be trying to open the shock while it's still under pressure in the piggyback...but you have to be in a coma for that...LOL! But seriously, I think the rear shock is easier to work on than most forks. Just a good service manual from the manufacturer is usually all you need to service a shock. If you need to replace the main seal, the hardest part is removing the peening on the main shock shaft to get the nut off...at least on most shocks...but even that isn't rocket science. I bought a Race Tech Gold Valve kit for my KYB shock, and it came with an excellent video on step-by-step instructions.

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i think he means the dangerous part would be riding around with it not working correctly. I agree, the bike is way unpredictable jumping and riding on rough braking bumps. My buddy has a track thats dry and hard packed and i didn't dare do any of the obstacles!

anyways, I'll look into it. I guess maybe i've done it wrong somewhere.

I agree, the rear shock is alot easier in my opinion to work on than the forks. I thought i was going to have to take the air boot off of the carb to get it out but i just unbolted all of the subframe. I twisted the boot a little and I got it to pull out. From there it was just a matter of what step was next, I think it could be done in under an hour if you didn't have to clean up the parts too much.

and hey, i've got to learn somehow huh? Trial and error. I'd like to learn it. I'm willing to put in time to learn and repair it myself.

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the metal washers have the taper the correct way?

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i'm not sure what washers you are talking about, there were spring guides that are tapered but i don't remember any washers that were tapered.

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you did not remove the valving?

did you bleed it?

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Also if you install the piston upside down you will have something similar to your description if it is upside down you will be able to compress the shaft real easy and it will go back out real fast

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