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Water in forks

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What would be the biggest culprit for letting water into forks besides seals?

Just redid for forks today. Last rebuild was when I got the bike last winter.

Seals are good. 30 hrs on forks since last rebuild.

I had a fair amount of milkiness to the oil, especially down around the base valve. Last time I did the forks I didn't replace the copper crush washers on the base valve, were original. These looked in pretty bad shape and I replaced them this time. But they weren't leaking any oil......

Orings top and bottom look good.

Both forks were equally bad, never had milky fork oil before....

Same fork oil I always use.

Could the old crush washers have been letting moisture in, but no oil out?

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Do you pressure wash your bike? If all the seals look good and you have no evidence of oil leaking, somehow water is getting in.jlow

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Hose washer every 4 rides or so, depends how muddy. Do alot of water crossings and mud, had a good mud race on the bike. But this is typical condtions for me and I've never had the issue before.

The only weak point I see was the crush washers on the base valve. But you would think it would leak a Little oil. Seals were new SKF and are still mint.

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I wonder about condensation ?

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Do you use fork bleeders ?

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Do you use fork bleeders ?

:ride:

That is my bet too. But if he has bleeders there should be rust somewhere at

the top of the fork underneath the cap and cup.

Basevalve needs a waterproof grease on the threads, oring and copper washer as water can work its way up through there.

jw

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I wonder about condensation ?

That was a thought, but it's pretty substantial ammount of milkiness and I've never had the problem before....

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:ride:

That is my bet too. But if he has bleeders there should be rust somewhere at

the top of the fork underneath the cap and cup.

Basevalve needs a waterproof grease on the threads, oring and copper washer as water can work its way up through there.

jw

I do use bleeders. But they aren't new, except the orings, and I've never had a problem with them before. And no signs of water mitigating from the top. Top half of oil in the fork was normal, milkiness got worse deeper you went. Base valve area the worse. I know water is heavier than oil but.....

Funny I was looking at my base valve threads and my jug of grease when I was regreasing my orings for the base. But the threads did not recieve grease.

New crush washer now, hopefully cures it. Will tear apart in a week or 2 and see how she looks.....

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Certain types of fork oils, usually the really good ones, have hydroscopic properties. they have components that absorb water. I assume your on the wet coast, you'll just have to change your oil more frequently.

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Ditch the bleeders. Use a screwdriver, unlaidened before your ride. Bleeders can cause problems. Think: You bleed the air out, ride, park your bike and the suspension is warm which has created a small amount of presure in the forks. Not thinking about this, you bleed the presured air out. Now as the forks cool, you create a negative presure, vacuum inside the forks. Fork seals seal presure side only(inside to out, not outside to in). With a vacuum you can pull in air and moisture(from washing or just the moisture in the air). I only use my bleed screws before the first ride of the day, that is it. Never bleed the air out when the forks are warm if your gonna park it. Not to mention I got nailed by a rock from roost which hit the bleeder(dont ask me how but it landed just right behind the number plate) and broke the top off. I got hosed with fork oil everytime the suspension collapsed. THAT SUCKED!LOL!

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Ditch the bleeders. Use a screwdriver, unlaidened before your ride. Bleeders can cause problems. Think: You bleed the air out, ride, park your bike and the suspension is warm which has created a small amount of presure in the forks. Not thinking about this, you bleed the presured air out. Now as the forks cool, you create a negative presure, vacuum inside the forks. Fork seals seal presure side only(inside to out, not outside to in). With a vacuum you can pull in air and moisture(from washing or just the moisture in the air). I only use my bleed screws before the first ride of the day, that is it. Never bleed the air out when the forks are warm if your gonna park it. Not to mention I got nailed by a rock from roost which hit the bleeder(dont ask me how but it landed just right behind the number plate) and broke the top off. I got hosed with fork oil everytime the suspension collapsed. THAT SUCKED!LOL!

I like bleeders. I only bleed before a ride but it's pretty crucial with the big elevation changes we have around here at different riding spots. Before bleeders I found I was going through alot of screws and orings. I ride 3-5 days a week...

I've been using bleeders for 3yrs with no issues in the past.

I hide my bleeders under my bars so they hopefully never break off.....

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Certain types of fork oils, usually the really good ones, have hydroscopic properties. they have components that absorb water. I assume your on the wet coast, you'll just have to change your oil more frequently.

Same fork oil I always use, Maxima racing...

Definately was the wet coast today, track was more fit for swamp buggies :ride:

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Mr BC boy, you did some riding over the winter didn't you... Met some snow and ice? Maybe some chilly, chilly days you broke though some ice into freezing water that instantly put a thin coat of ice on your bottom tubes, and then was forced into the oil when your suspension compressed.... Luck of the draw, riding in our fair land between Nov and may is tough on the bikes...

I'm making assumptions here but fork oil can get contaminated in a hurry when the temps are around 0C. No rhyme or reason, almost never damages seals but little pieces of ice get in there somehow.

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I was once an Alberta boy.....

Snow and ice, yes.

Below 0 temps, no. Bike was a project rebuild all winter, started riding it in late March/ early April.

I hope it was just the bad crush washers....

Just baffles me how no oil could get out, but moisture could get in.

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I was once an Alberta boy.....

Snow and ice, yes.

Below 0 temps, no. Bike was a project rebuild all winter, started riding it in late March/ early April.

I hope it was just the bad crush washers....

Just baffles me how no oil could get out, but moisture could get in.

Well, IMO , just think of it like this. Water/moisture is thinner then oil. So, what would travel through an orfice easier? Water or Oil? If you had bad crush washers and oring, you've just fixed it!:ride:

Next time, throw a little grease on the oring and washer, and a little on the threads.:lol:

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Well, IMO , just think of it like this. Water/moisture is thinner then oil. So, what would travel through an orfice easier? Water or Oil? If you had bad crush washers and oring, you've just fixed it!:ride:

Next time, throw a little grease on the oring and washer, and a little on the threads.:lol:

Makes sense.

Thanks for your help :lol:

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