torque wrench

just curious what other people are using for a torque wrench, or if anyone knows anything about my particular wrench. i bought a craftsman 3/8" digitorque wrench and used it yesterday for the first time and i definitely did not feel it break. i set it to 5ftlb when i was tightening my frame oil plug and stopped because it felt like way too much force for 5ftlb. tested it on some bolts on other stuff that didn't matter(not on my bike, everything matters on there) and it wouldn't break. maybe i'm missing it but i would think i would notice it when it torques out.

Take it to sears and have it tested/calibrated. They'll do it for free for the lifetime of the wrench. I have a craftsman as well, and have had no problems with it. Make sure that you set it back to zero after using it to release spring tension, or you will ruin the wrench over time. What are the minimum to maximum ft/lbs?

5ftlb is very low setting for a craftsmen tq wrench,,, no way would I trust that wrench at those settings..... 60inlb is something you need a quality 1/4 drive tq wrench for.

You did well to stop using that tq wrench for installing the drain plug,, good on ya.

Take it to sears and have it tested/calibrated. They'll do it for free for the lifetime of the wrench.

You sure about that??? Never seen a sears store have a calibration set up.. Never seen them offer the service for free, and the warranty clearly states calibration is not covered. What city and store did you luck out in?

i only had it set at 5 because i wanted to see it break before it got to its actual setting, and that was its lowest setting on the wrench.

Product Description

3/8 in. square drive Wrench with digital readout. Our easiest to set and most accurate. Measures 5 to 80 ft. lb. in 0.5 ft. lb. increments.

Superior internal mechanisms reduce friction and provide accurate and consistent measurements. Readout gives precise torque settings in both English and metric units. Accurate to ±3 percent on clockwise or right-handed reading greater than or equal to 20 percent of capacity.

Crappy specs on the 3/8 wrench, and notice... Even then the wench is not rated below 20% of the scale. With 5 ftlb being at the bottom of the scale.. The is no telling what the tq rating is, nor if that wrench is capable of repeating that number.

i only had it set at 5 because i wanted to see it break before it got to its actual setting, and that was its lowest setting on the wrench.

I don't know about Craftsman, but on my Snap-on clicker style torque wrenches, the lower the setting, the softer the "break" or click. Maybe at the 5 lbft setting the break you seek is too soft to be felt.

Try something less fragile at a higher setting. Torque your rear axle nut to spec. :ride:

You sure about that??? Never seen a sears store have a calibration set up.. Never seen them offer the service for free, and the warranty clearly states calibration is not covered. What city and store did you luck out in?

Maybe I should look over my warranty coverage again! :lol: It was a christmas gift from my father and that's what he told me. I haven't had it long enough to have it calibrated yet, so I'm not speaking from personal experience as far as that goes. I just know my dad's been using craftsman for years and I assumed he was correct. If my warranty says something different I'll post back, if not, I stand corrected. :ride:

mike, have you used it before and felt it break or click or whatever it does? i'm wondering if its so slight i wouldn't notice.

mike, have you used it before and felt it break or click or whatever it does? i'm wondering if its so slight i wouldn't notice.

If your talking about the 3/8" 5-xx ftlb craftsman tq wrench,,, yes at a setting of 5ftlb (bottom of the scale) it will either not click, or be so light you'll not feel it click,,,just kind of go soft and break over a few more deg.

Maybe I should look over my warranty coverage again! :lol: It was a christmas gift from my father and that's what he told me. I haven't had it long enough to have it calibrated yet, so I'm not speaking from personal experience as far as that goes. I just know my dad's been using craftsman for years and I assumed he was correct. If my warranty says something different I'll post back, if not, I stand corrected. :ride:

CRAFTSMAN mechanics tools & CRAFTSMAN hand tools include: Sockets, Wrenches, Wrench sets, Hex wrenches, Ratchet wrench handles, Micro adjustable torque wrenches ( not including calibration), Pipe wrenches, Hammers, Screwdrivers, Pliers, Cutters, Scroll and Metal saws (except saw blades), Hand drills, Hand saws, Squares, Levels, Drift punch and drive punch sets, Shears are covered by the Craftsman lifetime warranty.Craftsman Tools not covered by the lifetime warranty include: Micro-adjustable torque wrench calibration, Hand tools cutting edges, Portable electric tools, Bench and Stationary tools, Battery operated tools, Precision measuring tools.

I use a 1/4 inlb when torque wrench something that low. 5lb would be very hard to feel if you can fell it at all when it's at the lowest seating. Get yourself a good inlb torque wrench it will take away that scary feeling.

I buy nearly all my craftsman tools on black friday at 50 off. Picked up three different tourque wrenches this was for $39 ea

If I remember correctly, a torque wrench should be used in the middle third of it's range, that's where they are most accurate. Asking the wrench to measure 5 ft/lb is like asking a bathroom scale to be accurate in grams, not gonna happen. Get a 1/4 drive for the smaller bolts. Also, at 5 lbs, you may not feel the 'break'.

Lastly, never use a torque wrench to loosen bolts, tighten only

Keep in mind, all Crafstman tools of today are not of the same quality as the were in the past, say 20 years ago.

I don't like micro adjustable (clicker) torque wrenches of any brand. Closed beam dial torque wrenches are preferred.

Any torque wrench has to be of the correct scale for he torque intended. About 50% to 90% of the wrench scale. Torque wrenches are accurate to some percentage of the full scale reading. So a 100 ft lb wrench accurate to 5% is 5 ft lb at 100. And 5 ft lb at 50. See why it is not used below 1/2 scale.

I have not seen the scale given for the wrench in this post. I suppose a 3/8 drive wrench is at least 50 ft lb. No good at 5.

CRAFTSMAN mechanics tools & CRAFTSMAN hand tools include: Sockets, Wrenches, Wrench sets, Hex wrenches, Ratchet wrench handles, Micro adjustable torque wrenches ( not including calibration), Pipe wrenches, Hammers, Screwdrivers, Pliers, Cutters, Scroll and Metal saws (except saw blades), Hand drills, Hand saws, Squares, Levels, Drift punch and drive punch sets, Shears are covered by the Craftsman lifetime warranty.Craftsman Tools not covered by the lifetime warranty include: Micro-adjustable torque wrench calibration, Hand tools cutting edges, Portable electric tools, Bench and Stationary tools, Battery operated tools, Precision measuring tools.

I stand corrected, thanks.

I stand corrected, thanks.

Maybe not' it depends on which tq wrench you bought. The electronic model has a 90 calibration deal. All others not even that.

For me trying to torque stuff like that is an exercise in frustration. Calibrate your forearms and pay attention as you "snug"...you can really feel when the bolt is set. They do come in handy for the bigger values, but the smaller stuff I just do my hand. For real small stuff(firearms), I like my inch pound torque screwdriver for consistent repeatable accuracy.

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