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First adventure soon. Advice?

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Taking my first bike trip. A friend and I are going down to myrtle beach for a week or so. Total trip mileage should be 1700 miles or so, no freeways we will be on state highways mostly. He has a FZ6 sport bike and I'm on a DR250SE dual sport. We are tent camping each night.

Trying right now to figure out what clothes/tools I'll need. I'm only going to bring basic tools, ratchet and socket set, adjustable wrench, visegrips, flat and phillis screwdriver, zip ties duct tape and some tire irons. Clothes I plan on packing just 1 pair of jeans and 1 pair of shorts, and 3-4 sets of socks/tshirts/underwear, will do a load of laundry at some point in the trip.

Tent with sleeping bag and pillow will be my home, so what thing should I look out for or think about doing?

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Sounds like a great time. I would bring a small ratchet set, Some pliers, and an extra quart of oil just in case. I am big time jelous times of your trip.

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If you don't already have one, I highly recommend a good sleeping pad for under your sleeping bag. Big Agnes makes a nice insulated one that packs up really small and weighs about a pound. You have to inflate/deflate it yourself (as opposed to Thermarest's self-inflating one) but it's worth it...really comfortable and will keep you off the cold hard ground. Riding every day is miserable when you don't sleep well at night. Take earplugs if you're going to be camping in regular campgrounds.

It's always good to be prepared for cold/wet weather. I carry micro-fleece lined tights and an UnderArmour Cold Gear shirt with me at all times. They are lightweight, pack up really small, fit under gear or regular clothes and are great for sleeping in if it gets cold at night. I also carry a small fleece beanie.

Leave the cotton shorts/socks/t-shirts at home and take synthetic or silk stuff with you. It packs up smaller and dries much quicker. You can handwash it at night before hitting the sack (Camp-Suds or other biodegradeable soap rinses out really easily) and have it be dry in the morning.

I carry Teva sandals with me so I can get out of my boots at the end of the day. They're unattractive as sin but they can be worn with socks (thereby making them even uglier) and can double as hiking shoes, water shoes and "lounge around camp" shoes. They don't take up valuable space as I just run my Rokstraps through them on the outside of my drybag.

Speaking of drybags, if you're not using them you might want to take a couple of big heavy-duty garbage bags with you just in case. Nothing worse than bike camping in the rain and having all your stuff get wet.

Rokstraps are a bike campers best friend :smashpc:

Take notes or keep a short journal. It could be as simple as a few post-it notes in your wallet. I learn something new on every bike camping trip I take and I've been doing it for awhile. I have a "bike-camping" list and I keep most of my stuff together so I don't forget anything. I add/delete as I learn new stuff. It's a process, and it's a ton of fun!

Have a great time and take lots of photos!

WoodsChick

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Taking my first bike trip. A friend and I are going down to myrtle beach for a week or so. Total trip mileage should be 1700 miles or so, no freeways we will be on state highways mostly. He has a FZ6 sport bike and I'm on a DR250SE dual sport. We are tent camping each night.

Trying right now to figure out what clothes/tools I'll need. I'm only going to bring basic tools, ratchet and socket set, adjustable wrench, visegrips, flat and phillis screwdriver, zip ties duct tape and some tire irons. Clothes I plan on packing just 1 pair of jeans and 1 pair of shorts, and 3-4 sets of socks/tshirts/underwear, will do a load of laundry at some point in the trip.

Tent with sleeping bag and pillow will be my home, so what thing should I look out for or think about doing?

I live a little over an hour from Myrtle beach, and i'm from there. Shoot me a PM or something, and i'll shoot you some local area pointers. :smashpc:

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OK, PM sent. I tried to narrow it down to the best places to eat, drink, and catch up on some eye candy. I also provided you links to good local state park camp grounds that have outfitted camp sites (electrical and water), laundry, and all that jazz. I gave you a link to the closest OHV trails, which are close by, incase you get froggy and didn't get enough on the ride down.

To be honest, that's going to be a long ass way on a dual sport. That would be a long way in a luxury car. I hope you're ready for it, and set plenty of time asside. Your ass is going to be pretty numb after a few hundred miles. :smashpc:

You might want to change the oil and stuff in your bike before you leave, and i'd plan on getting it changed before I left to come back. Those will be some hard miles on the bikes. You better be ready for humid, cold weather too. You yanks have much colder weather temp wise, but there's nothing like that cold, humid breeze by the ocean. It's not cold right now, but I noticed a cold front coming in soon, and it might hit about the time you make your way down. Just make sure you have something that will keep the cold air out, or you'll regret it. Flip Flops are standard equipment at the beach, so make sure and bring a pair of those.

Good luck man. As I said in the message, if i'm freed up around that time period, i'll slide down and drink a cold one with you.

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I've done two trips on my XR250L- 800 miles around Lake Erie and 1200 miles from Ohio to Iowa and back. A couple of suggestions:

Make a list of what you need to take, and check everything off as you pack it.

Padded bike shorts will literally save your ass. Well worth the investment. Put them on under your jeans, but don't wear underwear with them or you'll chafe horribly (don't ask how i know!)

Music helps alleviate boredom and keeps you focused. Take some headphones and an ipod.

I highly recommend a GPS in a magnetic tank bag. I just used my regular old garmin. Even if you know your route, it can be very helpful to find gas or a motel in a pinch, or if a road happens to be closed for some reason. Have a map as a backup in case your GPS or power port fails.

Wire in a 12v power port so you can charge your cell phone and ipod and run the GPS if you take one. If you're camping there will be nowhere to charge your stuff. I picked up a power port at Auto Zone for about $8 and tied it into my headlight power circuit. I mounted it to a small piece of flat metal and bolted that to one of the handlebar bolts. It worked great.

Absolutely get a rain suit, waterproof gloves, and waterproof boots. Nothing will make a road trip more miserable than being wet and cold. I did my 800 mile trip with an open face MX helmet, and the rain made it miserable. Get a closed faced helmet. don't forget to get waterproof covers for your bags or bring garbage bags to wrap your stuff in if it rains. Put the rain suit on and cover your stuff if it LOOKS like it's going to rain, don't wait until it starts.

More streetable tires are helpful. Knobbies whine loudly and it will get really annoying, not to mention they'll be shaky at 55-60 mph which is how fast you'll go on a lot of those back road state routes. I use Shinko 700s, a 50/50 tire. Still work great for gravel and dirt roads. I have over 2000 miles on them and they are barely worn; 1700 miles will almost wear out some more aggressive tires. I ran my tires at 22 psi.

Take spare tubes and tire irons. Never know if you'll get a flat. I run slime in mine just to minimize the risk.

Make sure you still do regularly scheduled maintenance- lube and adjust chain, change oil, etc. Change your oil and filter, clean your air filter, and lube/adjust chain right before you leave. Also make sure your bike is in tip top shape.

I chain my bike to a tree or picnic table when camping at night and put all my bags in the tent with me. When i motel it, I find a motel I can push my bike inside the room.

I took a 1 gal gas can on my bike because my range is only 85-100 miles before reserve. If you get caught without a gas station you'll at least have another gallon of gas to get you to one. You'd be surprised how many stretches of state routes can go 50-60 miles without a gas station.

Expect to ride about 200 miles/day using state routes. You'll make good time on open roads, but larger cities will slow your progress down a lot. You also have to factor in butt breaks and stops for gas and food. It took me about 3 days to go 800 miles, but I rode 3 10 hour days, which was really tiring. When I went to Iowa I did fewer miles/day and it was much more enjoyable. That trip took 6 days.

Give yourself an extra day or two travel time in case you have a break down or it pours rain one whole day and you can't ride.

A camelbak is great because you will get thirsty while riding. Some small sips to keep your mouth from getting dry is a lifesaver. You can get a cheap one at walmart for about $20.

Stop and smell the roses. Little breaks for local interest stuff really helps break up the monotony that can set in after a few days.

Carry cash but have backup in your account. Call your bank and let them know you'll be traveling so they don't put a hold on your card when they start seeing it used out of state. I stayed in cheap motels and between that, gas, and food I spent about $70/day. You will spend less if you're camping and splitting the cost with someone else.

Most of all, have fun! You'll get home and start thinking about your next trip, trust me! Both times I went I felt incredible- didn't think about work, girl problems, my divorce, anything. I just concentrated on riding and taking in the whole experience. It's very freeing.

If you want, I can PM you the list of things I took with me.

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FYI, it's harley week this week. Starts officially tomorrow night. If you're coming this week, you'll have a ball. You'll definately want to stay away from myrtle beach though, trust me. You'll have all you can handle in Murrells Inlet.

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I've done two trips on my XR250L- 800 miles around Lake Erie and 1200 miles from Ohio to Iowa and back. A couple of suggestions:

Make a list of what you need to take, and check everything off as you pack it.

Padded bike shorts will literally save your ass. Well worth the investment. Put them on under your jeans, but don't wear underwear with them or you'll chafe horribly (don't ask how i know!)

Music helps alleviate boredom and keeps you focused. Take some headphones and an ipod.

I highly recommend a GPS in a magnetic tank bag. I just used my regular old garmin. Even if you know your route, it can be very helpful to find gas or a motel in a pinch, or if a road happens to be closed for some reason. Have a map as a backup in case your GPS or power port fails.

Wire in a 12v power port so you can charge your cell phone and ipod and run the GPS if you take one. If you're camping there will be nowhere to charge your stuff. I picked up a power port at Auto Zone for about $8 and tied it into my headlight power circuit. I mounted it to a small piece of flat metal and bolted that to one of the handlebar bolts. It worked great.

Absolutely get a rain suit, waterproof gloves, and waterproof boots. Nothing will make a road trip more miserable than being wet and cold. I did my 800 mile trip with an open face MX helmet, and the rain made it miserable. Get a closed faced helmet. don't forget to get waterproof covers for your bags or bring garbage bags to wrap your stuff in if it rains. Put the rain suit on and cover your stuff if it LOOKS like it's going to rain, don't wait until it starts.

More streetable tires are helpful. Knobbies whine loudly and it will get really annoying, not to mention they'll be shaky at 55-60 mph which is how fast you'll go on a lot of those back road state routes. I use Shinko 700s, a 50/50 tire. Still work great for gravel and dirt roads. I have over 2000 miles on them and they are barely worn; 1700 miles will almost wear out some more aggressive tires. I ran my tires at 22 psi.

Take spare tubes and tire irons. Never know if you'll get a flat. I run slime in mine just to minimize the risk.

Make sure you still do regularly scheduled maintenance- lube and adjust chain, change oil, etc. Change your oil and filter, clean your air filter, and lube/adjust chain right before you leave. Also make sure your bike is in tip top shape.

I chain my bike to a tree or picnic table when camping at night and put all my bags in the tent with me. When i motel it, I find a motel I can push my bike inside the room.

I took a 1 gal gas can on my bike because my range is only 85-100 miles before reserve. If you get caught without a gas station you'll at least have another gallon of gas to get you to one. You'd be surprised how many stretches of state routes can go 50-60 miles without a gas station.

Expect to ride about 200 miles/day using state routes. You'll make good time on open roads, but larger cities will slow your progress down a lot. You also have to factor in butt breaks and stops for gas and food. It took me about 3 days to go 800 miles, but I rode 3 10 hour days, which was really tiring. When I went to Iowa I did fewer miles/day and it was much more enjoyable. That trip took 6 days.

Give yourself an extra day or two travel time in case you have a break down or it pours rain one whole day and you can't ride.

A camelbak is great because you will get thirsty while riding. Some small sips to keep your mouth from getting dry is a lifesaver. You can get a cheap one at walmart for about $20.

Stop and smell the roses. Little breaks for local interest stuff really helps break up the monotony that can set in after a few days.

Carry cash but have backup in your account. Call your bank and let them know you'll be traveling so they don't put a hold on your card when they start seeing it used out of state. I stayed in cheap motels and between that, gas, and food I spent about $70/day. You will spend less if you're camping and splitting the cost with someone else.

Most of all, have fun! You'll get home and start thinking about your next trip, trust me! Both times I went I felt incredible- didn't think about work, girl problems, my divorce, anything. I just concentrated on riding and taking in the whole experience. It's very freeing.

If you want, I can PM you the list of things I took with me.

You put Slime inside your tubes? Will that help if you get something thru the tire into the tube? Thanks for Advice, Steve

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Don't plan too much...go with flow & you'll have even more of an adventure.

Ride the wheels off your bike & have fun

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Hey Steve,

I don't use Slime, I use something else, I can't remember what it's called but it comes in a tall clear bottle and it's grey with little black flecks. Honestly IDK how well it works... it won't work for a cut (I pinched a tube and it leaked) but if you run over a thorn and it stays in the tube it should at least slow down the leak if not stop it. At $10 a bottle (which will do both tires with some left over) I figured it's cheap insurance, and will hopefully at least let me limp out of the woods.

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Only buy food each day, I packed too much food and had to carry it most of my last trip while I was thinking "this backpack would be alot lighter without canned food in it"!

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Only buy food each day, I packed too much food and had to carry it most of my last trip while I was thinking "this backpack would be alot lighter without canned food in it"!

👍 First of all, don't carry canned food in your backpack :smashpc:

If you must carry canned food (I carry a can of chili if I have room) put it in your saddle bags, GiantLoop, etc. I don't usually have the option of stopping for food every day since I'm usually where there's no food available so I carry dried backpacker food. Some of it is actually pretty good. It's nice and light, too, so if I need to I can carry it in my backpack without having to pay the weight penalty.

Those packets of tuna that don't need to be drained have been a godsend for me. Just grab a few mayo packets next time you're at a fast food joint and you're good to go. Corn tortillas travel well up against the back of my saddlebags (doggy backpack slung over the back of my seat) and make a great substitute for bread. If you must have bread, get a baguette, cut it in 3 sections and put it in a zip-loc. They travel well, last a long time and make great buns for sausage cooked over the fire. Oranges travel well and provide me with fresh juice in the morning that doesn't have to be refrigerated.

WoodsChick

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get a giant loop coyote.

cotton jeans are going to SUCK when they get wet. wear something beside cotton.

bring rain gear, boot gaiters (like CROCS), and WATERPROOF boots. I have never had a pair of waterproof MX boots... I use hiking boots on long trips

get a penny stove... google search it

get a cheap inflatable mattress. I got one at target for $10, twin size. use the exaust on your bike to inflate it.. run the bike at idle only, too hot if revved up.

get a cheap pup dome tent or something similar that will fit the mattress.

get some SEATTLESPORTS dry bags for your clothes and sleeping bag. dont buy that chineese crap for dry bags

good luck!

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An extra quart of your preferd oil, a mat to sleep on, it helps smooth out those tree roots and stones. I would bring some fleece clothin as it will keep you warm even if it gets wet. It saved my life a few years ago when I flipped a boat while duck hunting. It wicks water away and drains water in no time, and also dries out quickly. A zippo lighter would be good to have. A back pack is a good thing even if your bike has lots of racks and bags. Snacks like trail mix and crackers and stuff will keep costs down a bit cause you can buy a whole box for what a couple of packs will cost in a convenient store.

Go through your bike before you leave. Clean everything. Change oil, air filter, lub everything. And take a very comfratable seat cause after you ride a long ways on that bike your a$$ is gonna be killing you. I rode a little over 100 miles yesterday on my XR650R and my tail was in agony by the time I got back home. Your seat is proboby better than mine though cause it cant be any worse. Have a great time and be carfull!

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Good advice beaver... I dont bother with oil, but it wouldnt hurt

Why were you sitting the whole time? I ride standing a lot so I dont care if I have a crappy seat

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Got back at 2am last night. Just before I left, my DR250 wouldn't start. I wound up borrowing my dads harley and we rode down just as planned. Split the mileage up on the way down, 250 on day 1, 350 on day 2, 200 on day 3. We came home yesterday and did all 800 miles, left at 8am, got home at 2am. Had a great time at the beach, thanks alot for the advice, everything went pretty smooth. I have never been quite this tired or sore in my life.

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Got back at 2am last night. Just before I left, my DR250 wouldn't start. I wound up borrowing my dads harley and we rode down just as planned. Split the mileage up on the way down, 250 on day 1, 350 on day 2, 200 on day 3. We came home yesterday and did all 800 miles, left at 8am, got home at 2am. Had a great time at the beach, thanks alot for the advice, everything went pretty smooth. I have never been quite this tired or sore in my life.

did you do any of that stuff I told you about?

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ddsaloon.jpg

Yes we did. Thanks for your reccomendations. We made use of the lack of a helmet law, got great food at our favorite spot the dead dog saloon, met a couple older chicks and wished we were 21 and 20! Got to chill out at the beach, eat some good seafood and took a helicopter ride. It was a good time for sure, now its time to plan the next trip!

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